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Zodiac 06-24-2010 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kbasa
:clap

Page 1000!



Woot!

Dahveed 06-24-2010 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
700c (622mm diameter) to 26" (559mm diameter) is... ummm, oh yeah. lots 31.5mm radius, blah.. ok, never mind. I was thinking it was (630-622)/2 == 4mm, but thats 27" to 700c, whoops..


well, for sure, I'll put the seat post at the lower more relaxed position even if it does mean giving up 3" of leg extension.

I'm thinking of scoring that Jamis anyways, and building it up with some 700c rims and x32 or x38 tires. one thing I'm not sure of is how large a frame it is. finding 700c 36 spoke wheels isn't easy :-/

I thought 700c referred to the diameter being 700cm. I never thought to actually measure it. :eek1

pierce 06-24-2010 06:01 PM

and 11, err, 10 more posts to break #15000

eeek.

pierce 06-24-2010 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
I thought 700c referred to the diameter being 700cm. I never thought to actually measure it. :eek1

yeah, heh. wheel sizes are all whacko.

so-called 29er are actually just wide 700c. note the ISO size numbers (622 for 700c, and 559 for 26") is actually the bead seat diameter, so the rims are a little bigger on the outside.

see http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rim-sizing.html for the full scoop.

if you look at most any modern tire, you'll see another size, like 21-622 for a 700c x 21 tire. or, 47-559 for a 26x1.9. This is the ISO aka ETRTO size.

pilot 06-24-2010 06:27 PM

I took the boy to a bike shop this afternoon that handles Specialized bikes. We got some help on sizing and stuff. We bought a couple helmets while we were there. Now we're ready to try that single track at the lake. :D

ducnut 06-24-2010 08:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce

hey, anyone know anything about Jamis bikes?

Their road stuff is really nice; in fact, award winning.

pierce 06-24-2010 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
Their road stuff is really nice; in fact, award winning.

ah, cool. well, I just bought the frame and forks for a 'Commuter' which was a 7-speed hybrid, originally with 700c x 38 wheels. oops, wife is home, ah well, this is gonna be along term project, i'll take pictures this weekend.

edit: found the geometry... inches/mm
Frame Size: 20.5
Center of BB to top of TT: 19.21/488
Effective TT Length: 23.07/586
Head Tube Angle: 72˚
Seat Tube Angle: 73.5˚
Chainstay: 17.52/445
Wheelbase: 42.01/1067
Fork Rake: 1.77/45
BB Height: 11.22/285
Headtube: 4.33/110
Standover: 30.91/785
so... its a pretty tall frame. I stuck a spare pair of 700c wheels under it and pretended to sit on it, and it seemed kinda short front-to-rear, but without handlebars, who knows? I'm thinking T-bars instead of cruiser bars on this one.

Someone jammed a 1-1/8th" seatpost into it thats seriously wedged and gonna require some serious hackery to remove... The stock post is 27.2 per the specsheet. I believe 1-1/8th is about 28.5mm :(

about given up on 36 spoke wheels, looks like 32 spoke is about as good as it gets anymore

hey, this thing originally had 700x38 tires. thats pretty much the same as a 29er, right? I stuck a 26x1.9 knobby mtn wheel in the forks and it fit just fine, except for the brakes... so I -probably- can put 29er wheels on this thing? As I understand it, 29er are just wider 700c rims?

trailer Rails 06-25-2010 05:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
As I understand it, 29er are just wider 700c rims?

Most of the time they are not any wider than a hybrid rim. There are lots of smaller 29er tires you could run. Panaracer makes some 700x37's that fit in most cyclocross bikes and are really knobby.

ducnut 06-25-2010 06:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
Someone jammed a 1-1/8th" seatpost into it thats seriously wedged and gonna require some serious hackery to remove... The stock post is 27.2 per the specsheet. I believe 1-1/8th is about 28.5mm :(

I don't understand the mentality of doing that. If it doesn't fit, it doesn't fit.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
about given up on 36 spoke wheels, looks like 32 spoke is about as good as it gets anymore

This guy can make anything. Very well known in touring circles. He's not going to be cheap.

Zodiac 06-25-2010 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
ah, cool. well, I just bought the frame and forks for a 'Commuter' which was a 7-speed hybrid, originally with 700c x 38 wheels. oops, wife is home, ah well, this is gonna be along term project, i'll take pictures this weekend.

edit: found the geometry... inches/mm
Frame Size: 20.5”
Center of BB to top of TT: 19.21/488
Effective TT Length: 23.07/586
Head Tube Angle: 72˚
Seat Tube Angle: 73.5˚
Chainstay: 17.52/445
Wheelbase: 42.01/1067
Fork Rake: 1.77/45
BB Height: 11.22/285
Headtube: 4.33/110
Standover: 30.91/785
so... its a pretty tall frame. I stuck a spare pair of 700c wheels under it and pretended to sit on it, and it seemed kinda short front-to-rear, but without handlebars, who knows? I'm thinking T-bars instead of cruiser bars on this one.

Someone jammed a 1-1/8th" seatpost into it thats seriously wedged and gonna require some serious hackery to remove... The stock post is 27.2 per the specsheet. I believe 1-1/8th is about 28.5mm :(

about given up on 36 spoke wheels, looks like 32 spoke is about as good as it gets anymore

hey, this thing originally had 700x38 tires. thats pretty much the same as a 29er, right? I stuck a 26x1.9 knobby mtn wheel in the forks and it fit just fine, except for the brakes... so I -probably- can put 29er wheels on this thing? As I understand it, 29er are just wider 700c rims?


You can easily get 36 spoke wheels, just have them hand built (which is much better than factory any day of the week) - and not all that much more expensive.

I believe Harris Cyclery in MA will build em, and I know a great place called Bikeworks in NYC (they have a website) which built my 36 spoke Mavic Open sports with Phil Wood hubs and double butted ss spokes pretty cheaply. They've never had to be trued, ever.


The seatpost= might want to turn the bike upside down, after dousing it in WD40 for a couple hours, then take a hairdryer and heat the seatube. When it's nice and warm rubber mallet the old seat and post down out of the frame. Gravity seems to work wonders for this, don't know why.

Zodiac 06-25-2010 06:48 AM

http://www.bikecult.com/works/parts.html

Blur 06-25-2010 06:59 AM

Mike Curiak seems to be at the hub of many wheelbuilding discussions on MTBR (pun intended):

http://www.lacemine29.com/

He laces wheels for a living. He doesn't own a bike store, offer bike tuning, building, accessory sales, etc. He only laces wheels. That's it. I've never owned a pair of his wheels but lotsa people I know have dealt with him. He's really well known in wheelbuilding circles (god, I crack myself up).

Askel 06-25-2010 07:00 AM

Well that sucks.

http://tourdivide.org/blog2010/memory_dave_blumenthal

Mr Head 06-25-2010 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
Hmmm. those campy hubs are probably thread on freewheel, right? I was hoping for cassette.

the problem with my current frame is, its a ridiculous size, like 1/32nd under 7/8" or something. My current seat post is actually a 7/8 that I turned down on a lathe to fit. :-/

Yeah the hubs are antiques, like me in that way, thought they are lighter.:rofl

When I had my Motobecane fixed, the builder milled out the old French-sized tube and replaced it with a nice Italian sized Columbus tube. I'm guessing your frame is French-built? If I remember correctly they were smaller diameter tubes.

pierce 06-25-2010 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head
Yeah the hubs are antiques, like me in that way, thought they are lighter.:rofl

When I had my Motobecane fixed, the builder milled out the old French-sized tube and replaced it with a nice Italian sized Columbus tube. I'm guessing your frame is French-built? If I remember correctly they were smaller diameter tubes.

whoa, we're mixing up bikes here. I do have a motley assortment around here.
bike #1) my red noname cruiser, is likely a early 1970s department store 1 speed steel cruiser frame, that was built up to a 5 speed cruiser in the late 70s using old school BMX parts, like fluted alloy bars, redline forks, etc. This is the one with the 13/16" seat post that has the cracked seat tube my neighbor is going to weld. I seriously doubt this welded steel beast was french. more likely early taiwan.

bike #2) the frame off a 2006 Jamis "Commuter" hybrid I got yesterday for $30, with a stuck 1-1/8" seat post in a 27.2mm aluminum seat tube and am planning to build up into some kinda hybrid city-bike, perhaps to take over bike #1's 'round town' duties if I'm forced to retire that frame :cry
and the rest of the list, just for amusement...
bike #3) my beloved (but beat to sh**) old 1975 Motobecane Grand Record, upgraded circa 1980 to all campi (mix of nuovo and super record), with 700c SuperChampion "Gentleman" rims on campi small flange hubs. a classic piece of reynolds 531 double butted hand lugged french art. the GR is a medium-long touring geometry frame, rather than the race geometry of the Team which was the model above it. only contribution to this story is borrowing its wheels last night to use to size #2 before coughing up the $30. BTW, this one has a 26.4mm campi seatpost, and a 22mm Phillips quill holding 1" (at the mount) bars. I have no intention of hackery on this bike, although I'm sure this frame would make a lovely fixie with its 41" wheelbase and plush 531 ride

bike #4) a 2001 Stumpjumper FSR Disc, happily sitting in my bike barn, waiting for me to get back into good enough shape to tackle Wilder Ranch again (7000+ acre state park with 35 miles of bike-friendly single-track and fire roads with 0-1000' elevation)

bike #5) a 1983 Stumpjumper Sport medium tall, currently parked here, most recently used as my boy's college campus bike, its a total tank.

bike #6) a 1984 Stumpjumper Sport in extra-small, my wife's old bike

bike #7) a 2007 Specialized Expedition Woman's Sport comfort bike recently bought for my wife.

bike #8) a mid 90s GT Rebound, my boy's old bike, small frame, mushy RockShox fork.

bike #9) a recently acquired 1998 Trek 420 in very-small, converted to a hybrid for my daughter.
geez, we do have too many bikes. hah. and I just donated some old kid bikes to the local Bike Church.

anyways. Back to the Hybrid #2frame... someone said hammer seat tube downwards, and I'm having a serious problem picturing this. where do you hammer?

I squirted a bunch of liquid wrench on it last night, and will do so again. then tackle with A) bigass pipewrench, B) large channel locks, and C) vice grips, because those are my best instruments of destruction. I'm guessing C will win. luckily, there's like 8" of this post sticking out, and using a coat hanger to find the bottom (its a hollow tube), its only 2" into the seat tube, so the bottom is right about where the top tube and the seat stays join the seat tube and only about 1/2" past the bottom of the 'split' where the (missing) seat tube clamp goes....

I just took my cheap dial caliber out there. luckily, the seat tube isn't 'stretched', it measures about 31.8mm both down in the middle and near the top where the 1-1/8 'mongoose' steel piece-of-crap was hammered in.

hmmm. frame spacing at rear axle is 133mm, thats odd. Sheldon lists 130mm (8-9-10 speed road, or 7 speed mtn) and 135mm (7-8-9 mountain). I guess I go 130mm and assume the quick releases can squeeze the triangle that 3mm difference. or do I go 135mm and stretch it a hair?


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