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-   -   Bicycle thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150964)

Bimble 07-16-2010 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
I don't think the fish are biting...

:nah

Needta try different bait.

:nod

M

even rajflyboy is more creative

Gummee! 07-16-2010 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bimble
even rajflyboy is more creative

Sad, huh?

:norton

M

Askel 07-16-2010 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bostonsr
bicycles are stupid.


Yeah, pretty much story of my life there. :lol3

Dahveed 07-16-2010 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bostonsr
god this thread sucks. I'm stupid. what a waste of bandwidth, Me. loser.

ass

fixt.

pierce 07-16-2010 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
I use a SRAM power link. Sometimes requires a pair of pliers to get it apart, but I'm only intentionally disassembling a chain at home where I've got all my tools, anyways. They work fine with Shimano chains, too.

I also carry a spare power link in my toolkit to repair a chain that breaks on the road.

but you'd need the chain punch to remove the bent/broken part of the chain cleanly before you could install a powerlink, no?

you also need the chain punch to cut a new chain to the proper length.

Gummee! 07-16-2010 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
but you'd need the chain punch to remove the bent/broken part of the chain cleanly before you could install a powerlink, no?

you also need the chain punch to cut a new chain to the proper length.

Pretty much, yeah.

I have an ancient Rivoli that works just fine on pretty much any chain I've ever had. :nod

I have newer ones with bigger handles that are easier to use, but they've dumbed em down so that you can only press out the pin X far. :norton

M

pierce 07-16-2010 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
Pretty much, yeah.

I have an ancient Rivoli that works just fine on pretty much any chain I've ever had. :nod

I have newer ones with bigger handles that are easier to use, but they've dumbed em down so that you can only press out the pin X far. :norton

M

I couldn't find my ancient rivoli, so i got a park which has bigger handles but is still pretty small. it works exactly like the rivoli, if you punch too far, oops, you blew it :D and has the 2nd ridge thing to push from the other side and re-space the plates. Its worked great on a couple SRam chains and on a couple KMC Z cheap chains. I do believe I'll be sticking with the SRam in the future, they shift nicer, and handle more extreme chainline offsets better.

now, note, NONE of my junk is 9-10 speed, its all 5-6-7-8.

Oznerol 07-16-2010 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
but you'd need the chain punch to remove the bent/broken part of the chain cleanly before you could install a powerlink, no?

you also need the chain punch to cut a new chain to the proper length.

Sure:

I'm not saying that I don't use a chain punch; Like I mentioned a couple of posts back, I carry a compact one in my toolkit, so that I can remove bent links and install a powerlink to fix a chain break on the road or trail, and I use a full-size punch at home if I need to cut a chain to the proper length.

But I won't break a chain with a punch and then try to reassemble it by pushing a pin back in after having pushed it almost all the way out. I was taught to do things that way when I took a maintenance course, and maybe it works fine on older, wider, more durable chains. But I've found that when I do this on 9-speed chains, I end up leaving them compromised so that they break again later, usually at the worst possible time (i.e. when I'm straining hard on the pedals to get up a hill in a too-tall gear).

pierce 07-16-2010 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
But I won't break a chain with a punch and then try to reassemble it by pushing a pin back in after having pushed it almost all the way out. I was taught to do things that way when I took a maintenance course, and maybe it works fine on older, wider, more durable chains. But I've found that when I do this on 9-speed chains, I end up leaving them compromised so that they break again later, usually at the worst possible time (i.e. when I'm straining hard on the pedals to get up a hill in a too-tall gear).

huh. I can't remember when I've ever broken a chain, but then I did most of my riding back when Sedis Oro were the chains to have, and everything was 1/8th... campy NR friction shifters on the downtube with 2x5 gears, regina freewheels and campy NR cranks... what more do ya need? heh. I did bust 2 early phil wood BBs, snapped the axle right off on the non-chain side powering up a hill in too tall of a gear (42:19 was the lowest gear I had on that setup). first one, they gave me a replacement. 2nd one, I took a refund and went back to campy BBs, and never looked back.

I've almost always assembled my chains via the push a pin out just enough that you can seperate the chain (you want about 1/64th sticking out the inside of the outer plate so its easier to reassemble), then pushing it back in, flipping the punch around the other side and using the middle notch on the punch to recenter the pin so both sides stick out equally to all the other pins you didn't mess with, make sure the chain flexes just fine at the pin you did, and fergit about it til next time.

jocflier 07-16-2010 10:15 AM

To those who commute every day, or bicycle messengers in San Francisco, You are Gods.:bow

Having a furlough day today, I went out and put in 30 in this morning. I am one of those 5:30 6:00 am start time kind of guys. So by the time I head back to the barn, it right during morning commute.

Two words...Fuck that:eek1 Big ass trucks, people trying to beat the light, cell phone caller. I was never more happy to be home safe and sound in my life.:lol3

Joc.:D

bostonsr 07-16-2010 10:46 AM

hahahahaha...you guys are too much.:lol3

joke's on you.

abe

Zodiac 07-16-2010 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bostonsr
hahahahaha...you guys are too much.:lol3

joke's on you.

abe



you throw a baseball like Joan Rivers.

jocflier 07-16-2010 05:05 PM

hubs
 
Will a good set of hubs make a middle of the road set of wheels better?Will they roll better? Or is it a combination of both a better hub and better wheels.

I am still learning and just wanted to know. Also, I assume that if you are going to buy new hubs you need to factor in the cost of having the wheels trued.

Thanks

Joc:D

Zodiac 07-16-2010 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier
Will a good set of hubs make a middle of the road set of wheels better?Will they roll better? Or is it a combination of both a better hub and better wheels.

I am still learning and just wanted to know. Also, I assume that if you are going to buy new hubs you need to factor in the cost of having the wheels trued.

Thanks

Joc:D


Good hubs are more important than the rims, it's the heart of the wheel, and will roll better and last longer (sealed bearings, etc).

If you're going with good hubs, might as well not skimp on spokes either, (use double butted stainless, quality). A decent Mavic rim by itself will serve fine, and if you have a good wheelbuilder do the set up truing will be a rare requirement.

jocflier 07-16-2010 05:35 PM

Thank you sir. Right now I have Fulcrum Racing 7 wheels, which are pretty much middle of road wheels, I think they could roll better. Any suggestion on a good hub?




Quote:

Originally Posted by Zodiac
Good hubs are more important than the rims, it's the heart of the wheel, and will roll better and last longer (sealed bearings, etc).

If you're going with good hubs, might as well not skimp on spokes either, (use double butted stainless, quality). A decent Mavic rim by itself will serve fine, and if you have a good wheelbuilder do the set up truing will be a rare requirement.



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