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Iced Tea 07-22-2010 06:37 PM

broke the frame on my bike yesterday:cry It's an Iron Horse Hollowpoint, Iron Horse which went belly up recently makes it difficult to find a new front triangle, got the frame stripped down going to try and get it welded up tomorrow, it's aluminum. riding my old cannondale for now.

pierce 07-22-2010 06:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
No. You don't.

I dunno. wearing them old black itralyan shoes with the metal cleats, and the cristophe straps cinched down, our feet were one with the pedal, and you powered the full stroke. I remember my stroke raised my heel on the up and lowered it on the down, and yes, scraped sh!+ off my shoes at the bottom.

Quote:

In the case of your cruiser bike, clipless still makes sense as long as they're mtn clipless. BUT that means ya gotta go buy some Keen bicycling sandals to go with em.
if you got Shimano SPD things on those sandals (and, yes, I saw the Shimano sandals on Sheldon's site, too), can you walk without going click-clack ? My cheaper Specialized Mtn shoes clack a fair amount on pavement, rocks, etc, to the point where I wouldn't want to go walking any distance in them. Yah, dey be shonuff better than them old black itralyan things, ewe-betcha.

TheNedster 07-22-2010 07:54 PM

Casting my ballot now to have Javarilla installed as king of the clydes.

Purchased everything I need to build up the frame I inherited from my brother last week. Jamis Durango 3.0 from 2006 or so. Mid-level, but way more MTB than I've ever had. It already has a fork, headset and stem and brakes. The wheelset shows up tomorrow and I picked up a chain, cables and tools today. Everything else will come from the my old ride. I've never tried to do anything like this before, the idea of rigging the ders, shifters and cables is kinda skeery:eek1 . But I figure that I'll learn best by doing. Or rather doing, dicking it up, and doing it over again. Repeatedly.

ducnut 07-22-2010 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
I've never tried to do anything like this before, the idea of rigging the ders, shifters and cables is kinda skeery:eek1

Re-cabling is easy. If you think you'll need to change out the stem or bars, you may want to leave a bit of slack. Otherwise, I turn the bars full lock, when determining housing length. I keep the cabling as short as possible, for a cleaner look. If you have cable stops that are in the same location on each side of the frame, cut both housings to identical length. This will give the cables a symmetrical look. If you know how to adjust the derailleur cable tension for proper shifting, you have the worst part licked. If not, post up.

Dahveed 07-22-2010 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
Casting my ballot now to have Javarilla installed as king of the clydes.

+1
He has a way with words... :thumb

pierce 07-22-2010 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
Re-cabling is easy. If you think you'll need to change out the stem or bars, you may want to leave a bit of slack. Otherwise, I turn the bars full lock, when determining housing length. I keep the cabling as short as possible, for a cleaner look. If you have cable stops that are in the same location on each side of the frame, cut both housings to identical length. This will give the cables a symmetrical look. If you know how to adjust the derailleur cable tension for proper shifting, you have the worst part licked. If not, post up.

and... ALWAYS put a cap on any sheath end where the cap will fit into whatever that end fits into. you don't need a cap on the brake end of a v-brake, because the noodle acts as one. and be sure to have sufficient cable tip caps too. I dunno what the correct crimping tool for these is, but I use a pair of wire cutters and just nick them til the tips are held on.

indexed shifting works better if you use this god awful parallel sheath that you can't cut with regular wire cutters.... me, I like friction shifting, and use brake sheathing for both brakes and shifters. and spiral wrap brake sheath can be cut by a good heavy duty sharp pair of diagonals, and either grinder/file the end, or what I usually do, is use some needlenose to be sure the cut spiral end isn't blocking the tube, then stick a awl into the plastic liner to open it up.

pierce 07-22-2010 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iced Tea
broke the frame on my bike yesterday:cry It's an Iron Horse Hollowpoint, Iron Horse which went belly up recently makes it difficult to find a new front triangle, got the frame stripped down going to try and get it welded up tomorrow, it's aluminum. riding my old cannondale for now.

ouch good luck. i had my old steel cruiser frame TIG'd by my neighbor-the-master-boilermaker last month when the seat tube cracked, but I'll never trust it again, no matter what kinda 2% chrome wire he used

Gummee! 07-22-2010 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I dunno. wearing them old black itralyan shoes with the metal cleats, and the cristophe straps cinched down, our feet were one with the pedal, and you powered the full stroke. I remember my stroke raised my heel on the up and lowered it on the down, and yes, scraped sh!+ off my shoes at the bottom.

Still no comparison. Remember, I've done both too. No comparison. At. All. Clipless = mo bettah. :nod Raced track in double straps for a bit and still went back to clipless.

Quote:

if you got Shimano SPD things on those sandals (and, yes, I saw the Shimano sandals on Sheldon's site, too), can you walk without going click-clack ? My cheaper Specialized Mtn shoes clack a fair amount on pavement, rocks, etc, to the point where I wouldn't want to go walking any distance in them. Yah, dey be shonuff better than them old black itralyan things, ewe-betcha.
Dunno. Never worn em. Give em a try and let us know. I DO know a hasher that wears em. Never heard him walking around tho. :dunno

M

Gummee! 07-22-2010 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
Casting my ballot now to have Javarilla installed as king of the clydes.

Purchased everything I need to build up the frame I inherited from my brother last week. Jamis Durango 3.0 from 2006 or so. Mid-level, but way more MTB than I've ever had. It already has a fork, headset and stem and brakes. The wheelset shows up tomorrow and I picked up a chain, cables and tools today. Everything else will come from the my old ride. I've never tried to do anything like this before, the idea of rigging the ders, shifters and cables is kinda skeery:eek1 . But I figure that I'll learn best by doing. Or rather doing, dicking it up, and doing it over again. Repeatedly.

Go read Park Tools' site.

Lots and lots of great info.

Always set high/low set screws without chain/cable on the rear derailleur. Less chances of 'oopses.' :nod

Worst case take it to a shop. Mebbe they'll teach you what you screwed up like the one I took my oopses to in college when I was learnin to work on stuff. Be ready for a ribbing tho. :nod

M

slackmeyer 07-22-2010 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iced Tea
broke the frame on my bike yesterday:cry It's an Iron Horse Hollowpoint, Iron Horse which went belly up recently makes it difficult to find a new front triangle, got the frame stripped down going to try and get it welded up tomorrow, it's aluminum. riding my old cannondale for now.

That's always a dicey proposition (aluminum frame repair), but if it's your only choice, at least do something to strengthen up the frame, like a gusset in the cracked area. Hope you can get someone who knows what they're doing for this.

TheNedster 07-22-2010 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
indexed shifting works better if you use this god awful parallel sheath that you can't cut with regular wire cutters.... me, I like friction shifting, and use brake sheathing for both brakes and shifters. and spiral wrap brake sheath can be cut by a good heavy duty sharp pair of diagonals, and either grinder/file the end, or what I usually do, is use some needlenose to be sure the cut spiral end isn't blocking the tube, then stick a awl into the plastic liner to open it up.

Yeah, I bit the bullet and got the purpose made cable/sheath cutters. Dood @ the LBS said I might be able to get away with dikes, so long as they're extra-sharp. All of mine are pretty much toast after years of chewing through aircraft safety wire. Luckily, I just have to worry about the shifter cables, the brakes are hydro.

Gummee! 07-22-2010 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
Yeah, I bit the bullet and got the purpose made cable/sheath cutters. Dood @ the LBS said I might be able to get away with dikes, so long as they're extra-sharp. All of mine are pretty much toast after years of chewing through aircraft safety wire. Luckily, I just have to worry about the shifter cables, the brakes are hydro.

You CAN use a cut-off wheel on a Dremel tool too. I've not done it on shifter housing, but I have used it to flatten brake housing. That spiral is hell on cable/housing cutters.

Just a note: if you get a GOOD cable/housing cutter it'll last damn near forever. My first Shimano tool is going on 20 years old. I bought another one a few years back, but it just sits in the toolbox!

If yer gonna use a cut-off wheel, keep a length of inner cable inside the housing. Helps. Or so I've read.

M

Dahveed 07-22-2010 11:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
Still no comparison. Remember, I've done both too. No comparison. At. All. Clipless = mo bettah. :nod Raced track in double straps for a bit and still went back to clipless.

Dunno. Never worn em. Give em a try and let us know. I DO know a hasher that wears em. Never heard him walking around tho. :dunno

M

Yeah, clipless was a huge improvement. I've never raced, but I used both and clipless rulez!

I've seen people wearing the shimano sandals. You're still gonna have the SPD cleat on the bottom of the sandal, but the rest of the sole is soft. I know some women recreational cyclists like to wear the sandals during the summer to avoid the cyclist tan (brown leg, white foot) which apparently is an issue with some women's footwear styles.

PaleRider 07-22-2010 11:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Javarilla
... on bikes heavier than yours. They ask "Is that man ok, mommy?" ... And so it goes :lol3

... they should, at the very least, comment on your nice steed :lol3

PaleRider 07-22-2010 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head
... on light days with only one or two classes, then ride up Lookout up to Evergreen then down Bear Creek Canyon and over to home. It was almost exactly 100 miles from my house up Bear Creek to Mount Evans and back ... Fun times.

... that's some serious 100 miles :nod :thumb


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