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trailer Rails 07-26-2010 05:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
:bow trailer Rails. Upon further review....I did as you suggested. It looks like the only thing broken is the washer. When the lever hit and hyperextended, it yanked the pushrod out of the piston, fracturing the washer. I've got snap ring pliers @ work and will swing by the LBS tomorrow to see if they have the appropriate washer (gonna trade 'em for the front der shims they gave me that were too thick).

Re: the rear rack for seat stay mounted calipers. Topeak makes one and it looks the business. I've been running one of their regular racks on my cross bike to commute. I load up with a lot of stuff sometimes (lunch, change of clothes, raingear, laptop, etc) and have had zero problems. Plus, I like the way their bags latch to the rack.

Yea, I think the washer is designed to break first. I always replace the pushrod, just in case it lost some material, plus it comes in the kit.

I have seen those topeak racks and they look pretty tough, probaly the best solution for that.

trailer Rails 07-26-2010 05:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
Well that kinda explains it.:lol3

You just unwittingly volunteerd to be my advisor if I go through with this build.

:lol3

trailer Rails 07-26-2010 05:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MapMaster
Trailer Rails,
What shop do you work at in da 'Burg?

Dirty Harrys :clap

ducnut 07-26-2010 05:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
I actually put twist shifters on one of my mountain bikes a couple of months back. I like them enough that I'll probably eventually convert all my mountain bikes over. I find them as precise as triggers, slightly slower for changing a single cog, but faster when dumping 3-5 at a time. And I like them much better for front shifting, since they let me trim the derailleur.

You have some valid points.

My Giant Anthem, XT equipped with a double chainring, can downshift a couple gears at a time, but, not 3-5. I've never had to trim the FD. No matter, as I can't imagine having to release bar grip to change a gear. Where I ride doesn't allow one to relax any aspect of their riding, as it's very tight and technical. We don't have wide-open singletrack like a lot of areas of the country. I guess it comes down to a matter of setup and type of terrain.

Quote:

Originally Posted by slackmeyer
Interesting you should say that- we were talking about the importance of aerodynamics today. I was riding with my wife and a couple of here friends, they all train for their double centuries together. I was surprised at how un-aero they were. Comfort is king on long rides, I know, but presenting less surface area seems like it makes a dramatic difference. I may try the aero bars.

As mentioned above, I use Profile's T1+ aerobars because of stack height and adjustability.

When mounted, they have about the highest stack height available. This doesn't help aerodynamics, but, does allow the armrest pads to sit much higher than most other offerings, which aids comfort. The T1+'s clamp on above the basebar, with the extensions above the clamps, and the armrest pads above that. Like I said, not the most aero, but, I'm chasing comfort. Many people automatically assume aerobars are only for time trials and that they're uncomfortable. Afterall, that's what they see when they encounter them. They don't realize that there are different ways to set them up. Your chin doesn't have to be rubbing the front tire. Many LD riders, such as the RAAM and Great Divide competitors, run them.

Now, onto adjustability. The T1+'s allow adjustment in the clamps, side-to-side and rotationally, fore/aft. The extensions can be adjusted fore/aft and rotationally, to perfectly set the hand grip distance and angle. The armrest pads slide fore/aft and rotate on the extensions, independently. The armrest pads, themselves, can be moved fore/aft and angled on their clamps. Lastly, the bars are separate. This allows them to mount to a wider variety of bars. Most basebars are tapered, from the clamp area to the grip area. Aerobars, like the Century and Airstryke, have a one-piece extension. These don't mount to most modern bars, as the clamp spacing puts them right on the taper.

You can see that my armrest pads are above my saddle height. The higher, the more comfort.
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...s/IMG_1064.jpg

You can get a better idea of the adjustments, from here. That's an Aerodrink bottle mount, in the middle, if you're wondering.
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...s/IMG_1073.jpg

Same model of aerobar on my TT bike. It's just setup with a lower stack height, due to stem angle and headtube length. Still, I can ride this bike 60+ miles without problem.
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...s/IMG_1127.jpg

For those interested, SRAM's new Apex drivetrain.
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...s/IMG_1129.jpg

trailer Rails 07-26-2010 05:58 AM

Apex on a tt bike? :huh At least you are running a road cassette.

I like the Apex stuff but it was designed to allow people who need 3 chainring road bike to ride 2 chainring road bikes.

Oznerol 07-26-2010 06:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
No matter, as I can't imagine having to release bar grip to change a gear. Where I ride doesn't allow one to relax any aspect of their riding, as it's very tight and technical. We don't have wide-open singletrack like a lot of areas of the country. I guess it comes down to a matter of setup and type of terrain.

Not sure I buy the argument that twisters are worse when it's tight and technical. New England (where I ride) is hardly known for open terrain, and I'd wager I spend most of my mountain biking time on trails every bit as tight and technical as yours.

Despite that, I don't find the twist shifters any less usable than triggers. If anything, the rapid variation in terrain here means that I'm often hammering through many cogs at once, not just one or two in order to fine-tune my cadence. And if I'm in the midst of the sort of technical move where I need to really clamp down on the bars, I'm not shifting anyways -- I can't afford the interruption in my ability to put down power.

Oznerol 07-26-2010 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I still like thumb friction shifters, especially the old suntour ones. you can go up or down as many gears as you want, and front trim? trivial. a couple of days riding with them and you'll be nailing your shifts just about as quick as a trigger shift. more than 7 in the back might get a little tricky, I guess. but geez, I rode centuries and centuries with 2x5 speeds, 2x7 or 3x7 is way plenty enough gearing.

I've tried Paul's Thumbies with Shimano barends to make thumb shifters a few times. For the rear I thought they were decent -- I still use the thumbie setup on my 1x6 bike. I love the mechanical simplicity/durability and the light weight.

For the front I never really learned to like them, even on a two-ring setup where I could basically use the limit screws to achieve 'indexed' shifting. I always found them to have a lot of stiction that made it hard to trim them properly: The effort needed to break the stiction meant that I often ended up moving the cage further than intended.

I suspect that may have a lot to do with the fussy front shifting on the bikes in question. The rear suspension design results in really ugly cable routing to the front derailleur. Setting it up nice and smooth on the workstand doesn't necessarily mean it'll work well on the ride. Being able to trim the front means that perfect setup isn't nearly as critical.

Dahveed 07-26-2010 06:54 AM

Well, first ride in 6 - 9 months and about 30 lbs. It was short, very short. Took me longer to muster up the courage and get ready than it did to actually ride it. I'm trying to ride from the house because I think it will be easier than loading up the car and heading to the flat spot to ride.

I live on a hill (maybe two mount Everests to you micro humans) and it kicked my fat ass. Today I'm looking for a new house at the bottom...

fifthcircle 07-26-2010 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
Well, first ride in 6 - 9 months and about 30 lbs. It was short, very short. Took me longer to muster up the courage and get ready than it did to actually ride it. I'm trying to ride from the house because I think it will be easier than loading up the car and heading to the flat spot to ride.

I live on a hill (maybe two mount Everests to you micro humans) and it kicked my fat ass. Today I'm looking for a new house at the bottom...

:clap
"looking for a new house at the bottom" :rofl Cracks me up dude!!!

You'll be rocking that hill in a few months, just keep at it :deal

fifthcircle 07-26-2010 07:36 AM

Flint Hills Death Ride
 
I made it!!!!!!! That was the hardest thing I have ever done in my life! From what I hear, the roads in that previous years were more gravel. This year, it was mostly larger rock two track roads. Three of us rode together, and we had a total of 4 flats on the road, and one after the finish. Took us over 9hrs to finish the 80mi course. Slow, yes. Epic, yes. Sore, yes. Getting the jersey to go along with my finishers medal, YES!!!

Dahveed 07-26-2010 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fifthcircle
I made it!!!!!!! That was the hardest thing I have ever done in my life! From what I hear, the roads in that previous years were more gravel. This year, it was mostly larger rock two track roads. Three of us rode together, and we had a total of 4 flats on the road, and one after the finish. Took us over 9hrs to finish the 80mi course. Slow, yes. Epic, yes. Sore, yes. Getting the jersey to go along with my finishers medal, YES!!!

Congrats! You earned that jersey so get it! Maybe next year you can work on shaving some time off the 9 hours.

ducnut 07-26-2010 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
Not sure I buy the argument that twisters are worse when it's tight and technical. New England (where I ride) is hardly known for open terrain, and I'd wager I spend most of my mountain biking time on trails every bit as tight and technical as yours.

Sorry. I didn't mean to imply that our stuff is more tight and technical.

Where I live, the closest area is in the river bottoms of a public park. The locals have developed trails down there and everything is up and down the ravines. They built planked bridges on fallen trees, to create bridges across the river. It's really cool, for us. I know there's way better stuff in the more mountainous regions. But, we have what we have. Anyway, it's constant up and down shifting. My GF's MTB has twistgrip shifters and it just doesn't seem as seamless to use. Probably takes some time to get used to it.


Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Apex on a tt bike? :huh At least you are running a road cassette.

I like the Apex stuff but it was designed to allow people who need 3 chainring road bike to ride 2 chainring road bikes.

I needed something for the 3 State 3 Mountain Challenge, next year. The Trinity is the lightest, most efficient thing I have. I climbed Smuggler's Notch, VT, and rode the loop, with it running 53/39 and 12-27. It wasn't too bad, but, I'm betting I'll need the lower gearing to climb 3 mountains over the course of 100mi. I have the 11-32 cassette for that. I don't limit components to their intended market. If they work for what you want, then, they work. And, I didn't feel the need to spend big money on fancier stuff, at my level.

What we're about to climb, Mt Mansfield.
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...p/IMG_0486.jpg

Headed up.
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...p/IMG_0492.jpg

On the other side. Yep, I ride my Zipps everywhere........
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...p/IMG_0503.jpg

......dirt and rock roads, too. Might as well use them!
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...p/IMG_0621.jpg

trailer Rails 07-26-2010 09:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut

I needed something for the 3 State 3 Mountain Challenge, next year. The Trinity is the lightest, most efficient thing I have. I climbed Smuggler's Notch, VT, and rode the loop, with it running 53/39 and 12-27. It wasn't too bad, but, I'm betting I'll need the lower gearing to climb 3 mountains over the course of 100mi. I have the 11-32 cassette for that. I don't limit components to their intended market. If they work for what you want, then, they work. And, I didn't feel the need to spend big money on fancier stuff, at my level.

What we're about to climb, Mt Mansfield.

On the other side. Yep, I ride my Zipps everywhere........

......dirt and rock roads, too. Might as well use them!

I did not mean to imply that Apex was a cheap group. It is just intended to people who do a lot of hills. Usually TT bikes are ridden on flat, straight race courses. You are using the bike for more of a cyclocross, climbing bike and the Apex parts suit that propose well. Those Zipps are very heavy wheels to be lugging up hills, you should run a more traditional wheel for the hilly days (unless that is your only set of wheels).

Mr Head 07-26-2010 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
There's a few ways to skin this cat.

#1 keep it original and go with a Cinelli stem and your old bars
#2 is go with a different bar/stem of 'modern' size still quill
#3 is get an adaptor and put a threadless stem on with a new bar

I have a few quill stems running around. I also have a Salsa 1" threadless stem that's 135mm long if you needta be stretched out. :augie

Of the 3, I'd go with the new quill stem and 'modern' dia bars. Makes it easier to go to any shop and get stuff.

Cinelli = 26.4mm
modern bars = 26.0mm (25.8 = same same basically)
oversized bars = 31.8mm

You CAN make a modern stem work on Cinelli bars, but it requires a chamfer on the edges of the plates that hold the stem on. :nod Did that on a few track bikes: ran Cinelli crit bars with Ritchey Pro stems

I know its more'n you wanted to know.

Lemme know whatcha wanna do

M

Finally got back to this. I'm headed to a tool store tonight to pick up a measuring stick. I have no idea what size my stem is.

The threadless thing looks like a winner. :clap

Cool. I'll keep the old junk I have for when I hang this thing up for good. (bottom bracket threads were cross threaded once by a ham-fisted kid in a bike hop that used to sponsor our team. I'd ordered my C Record BB and crank and they installed it without my asking during a meeting when I rode over one night. Of course I didn't find the cross thread until I pulled it apart about three weeks later to re-grease after a lot of rain and underwater work, (riding along Cherry Creek in a storm leads to much water riding .))...

So, I'm thinking eventually this bike will become wall-art.
Looks like I could get away with just the adapter, and stem, and a shim-thingy and keep the old bars, but I suspect the old bars have a dent in them from the wedge in the Cinelli stem clamping mechanism. Though I haven't seen what is going on in there yet.

The really sad thing is I once had several sets of bars and stems. The only stem I have at home now, I think is French and short, since the French bike was too big.

The other annoying thing is my Campy Super Record seat post is old enough that the friction surfaces on the wedges are smooth and allow the seat to slowly rotate backwards over the course of about 100 miles. And we know what that leads to...:huh

Anyway, Thanks Gummee! for the great information. I have not kept up with the tech at all.

Gummee! 07-26-2010 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
Not sure I buy the argument that twisters are worse when it's tight and technical. New England (where I ride) is hardly known for open terrain, and I'd wager I spend most of my mountain biking time on trails every bit as tight and technical as yours.

Despite that, I don't find the twist shifters any less usable than triggers. If anything, the rapid variation in terrain here means that I'm often hammering through many cogs at once, not just one or two in order to fine-tune my cadence. And if I'm in the midst of the sort of technical move where I need to really clamp down on the bars, I'm not shifting anyways -- I can't afford the interruption in my ability to put down power.

I'm with you. I've run twist shifters before too. Never found em to be hard to use. Only complaint I've ever had is they're backwards from MC throttles.

'Course, like I said above: I'm staying with thumb shifters. I've had tree branches damage derailleurs and the ability to still sorta shift is nice. Beats SS-ing it out. :nod

This is like an oil thread tho... No one's right and everyone's right.

M


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