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pierce 07-25-2010 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I am especially sensitive in the sit bone area. By far the best saddles I have used are the Specialized Body Geometry Sonoma saddles. I have actually bruised my ass from overly firm saddles. Most bike tourers prefer Brooks solid leather saddles...after they are broken in.

+1 on the cheaper Specialized BG seats. I like the low end Milano model too, $35 MSRP (for the non-gel version). if its too hard, then go for the 'gel' version.

Askel 07-25-2010 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I have an urban bike now. It has 700CC wheels and 32MM tires on it. I took them off and put them on my MTB. They fit perfectly and look good as they nearly fill up the "wheel well" area. 700 and 29er tires fit the same rim size.

I guess that begs the question of why I don't just use 700cc wheel to begin with. Most built 700cc rims don't have discs and have narrower road bike hub spacing, which is also one of the reasons I'm going with an MTB frame.

Another part of it is that I just want to have something unique.


OK, I understand now....

Still, all my biking tends to straddle the paved/dirt/trail divides on a regular basis. I tend to find that the geometry of most mountain bikes just doesn't favor the benefits of narrow tires. It's a personal preference thing. Worst case scenario, I guess- you have to replace the $199 frame. Not a huge loss, and probably worth the gamble if it works out for you.

Off the grid 07-25-2010 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
+1 on the cheaper Specialized BG seats. I like the low end Milano model too, $35 MSRP (for the non-gel version). if its too hard, then go for the 'gel' version.

Both my bikes had a Specialized BG Comp/pro seats. Best ones I have found by far, and hold up well, even after 10+ years. Of course I always get the "how do you sit on that tiny seat" thing.

/facepalm

Askel 07-25-2010 10:31 AM

Hey Tour Divide fans....


Cannonshot just rode most of the route on a KLR. Ride report in progress: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=603076

And this guy sets the gold standard for ride reports...

trailer Rails 07-25-2010 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
I've seen way too many people futzing with hydro brakes just before a race... all kinds of drama.

As a cheap bastard, I saw it as a good reason to stick with mechanicals. However, I did buy a new bike with hydros this year and I am loving them as far as power and modulation goes. Still, when it comes to adventure touring, you'll pry my mechanical BB7s out of my cold, dead hands. Dependable, durable, easily adjustable, and only a moderate loss in stopping power compared to my hydraulic brakes.

I have been running hydro discs since about 1997. I have only broken one line and that was when I broke my frame in half. I never had any problems on the trail. Bleeding is not that bad and rarely needs to be done. I am a fan of Avid hydros, with their bleed kit it is very easy to bleed the brakes. You can get a Juicy 3 hyrdo brake for a bout $70. Probably cheaper than a BB7 and brake levers. The new elixir brakes feel awesome.

trailer Rails 07-25-2010 10:46 AM

Magura brakes have to be the hardest to bleed.
Shimano is pretty easy to bleed. Just gravity bleed them, Fill the MC up and let the fluid drain out of the caliper, it is a slow process but works well and a lot less expensive than buying the shimano bleeding tool.
Hayes are pretty simple but I am not a fan of how the syringe hooks up to the caliper. I have had that pop off a few times and make a mess.
Avid, like I said above, are my favorite. Their bleed kit is inexpensive and easy to use.

Bimble 07-25-2010 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
Hey Tour Divide fans....


Cannonshot just rode most of the route on a KLR. Ride report in progress: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=603076

And this guy sets the gold standard for ride reports...

Subscribed. :D

I saw that and was getting ready to shoot you a pm with the link. :lol3

Askel 07-25-2010 10:50 AM

Cannonshot sent me an email with the link. :lol3

It's like the universe is conspiring to get me to enter the Tour Divide. :bluduh

Dranrab Luap 07-25-2010 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
Hey Tour Divide fans....


Cannonshot just rode most of the route on a KLR. Ride report in progress: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=603076

And this guy sets the gold standard for ride reports...

Nice!

NikonsAndVStroms 07-25-2010 11:51 AM

I'm hoping to get back into cycling whenever my body is up to it as a way to rebuild the muscle loss over the 2+ years but will need a few parts.

I have new in the box V-brakes so I might as well use them, so the big concern is the front fork. I have a RST from when front suspension was just getting into the sub 500 dollar bikes so it weighs a ton and has no travel. What would be a good lightweight (keeping overall weight down to a minimum will be key) fork that has decent travel, enough for dirt paths with the occasional root or 6-8 inch ditch.....I'm looking for something that is as cheap as can be while still offering a degree of quality.

Dranrab Luap 07-25-2010 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NikonsAndVStroms
I'm hoping to get back into cycling whenever my body is up to it as a way to rebuild the muscle loss over the 2+ years but will need a few parts.

I have new in the box V-brakes so I might as well use them, so the big concern is the front fork. I have a RST from when front suspension was just getting into the sub 500 dollar bikes so it weighs a ton and has no travel. What would be a good lightweight (keeping overall weight down to a minimum will be key) fork that has decent travel, enough for dirt paths with the occasional root or 6-8 inch ditch.....I'm looking for something that is as cheap as can be while still offering a degree of quality.

There are some bargain suspension forks on the market today that will outperform the good stuff from 5 years back. You could probably shop around and find a closeout Rock Shox Dart series for $100 or less. That fork will do all you need it to do and they aren't too heavy.

TheNedster 07-25-2010 12:06 PM

Speaking of brakes; went on a shakedown trail run this morning. Laid over pretty hard while panicking (dem hydros work good!) on a loose, rutty downhill chute. Took a quick inventory and found the front brake lever pointing the wrong direction.:bluduh

http://i800.photobucket.com/albums/y...m/SSPX0127.jpg

The socket of the ball joint connecting the lever to the master cyl. piston is busted. I'm gonna try replacing the piston (they're still available). A free bike is like a free puppy; ain't no such thing.:becca

ducnut 07-25-2010 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
By far the best saddles I have used are the Specialized Body Geometry Sonoma saddles. Most bike tourers prefer Brooks solid leather saddles...after they are broken in.

I second the BG saddles. I've had good luck with the Avatar and women's Jett (I prefer the Jett). The raised sit pads work well for people who can't handle any pressure on the perineal area. I use a BG on my tri bike, because the forward lean causes too much taint pressure, without sit pads. However, for my Tricross, I run a B17 Imperial (has the cutout). With long saddle time, the BG foam compresses to the point of sitting on the plastic seatpan. The plastic does not give to your body's pressure. That's what makes a Brooks so comfortable; it conforms to your pressure points. Soaking it in neatsfoot oil, before use, is the best way to make it supple.

Quote:

Originally Posted by kobudo28
I'm not diggin this aging thing at all though! :ddog

You're not alone! :lol3

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I want twist shifters and mechanical disc brakes with trekking type handlebars.

I can't even imagine wanting twist shifters. Trigger shifters work so much nicer, more precise, and faster. But, I'm not sure if triggers will ergonomically work with a trekker bar.

As for handlebars, Harris Cyclery offers trekkers in black for $25.

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
You might have a hard time fitting fenders and a rack with a frame that has the disc mount on the seatstays.

Something like this should work.

http://www.thetouringstore.com/TUBUS...t%20No%207.jpg
http://www.thetouringstore.com/TUBUS...t%20No%205.jpg

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
Cannonshot sent me an email with the link. :lol3

It's like the universe is conspiring to get me to enter the Tour Divide. :bluduh

"Gummee!" and I can ride sweep for whatever breaks/falls off your bike.

trailer Rails 07-25-2010 01:47 PM

Yea, there are a few options out there but they are flimsy. Most will be fine if you are only going to use the rack for light loads every once and a while. Any time I have put one of those adapters on someones bike that actually uses their rack, the adapter has broken.

Dranrab Luap 07-25-2010 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Yea, there are a few options out there but they are flimsy. Most will be fine if you are only going to use the rack for light loads every once and a while. Any time I have put one of those adapters on someones bike that actually uses their rack, the adapter has broken.

You have a wealth of knowledge about bikes. Are you or have you been a mech, or just a junkie?


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