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trailer Rails 07-25-2010 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
Speaking of brakes; went on a shakedown trail run this morning. Laid over pretty hard while panicking (dem hydros work good!) on a loose, rutty downhill chute. Took a quick inventory and found the front brake lever pointing the wrong direction.:bluduh

http://i800.photobucket.com/albums/y...m/SSPX0127.jpg

The socket of the ball joint connecting the lever to the master cyl. piston is busted. I'm gonna try replacing the piston (they're still available). A free bike is like a free puppy; ain't no such thing.:becca

It is a pretty easy fix. first pull the grip and move the lever clamp to the end of the bar. Lay the bike down on the drivetrain side so that you can see down into the lever. Next unscrew the piston pushrod from the lever and unbolt the lever from the body. You will probaly need a piston pushrod rebuild kit (Less than $10). Now take the snap ring out very carefully. Use something to keep the piston from popping out. Now put everything back together starting with the new pushrod, then washer, then snap ring. All the while keeping the piston from popping out. Now screw the pushrod back into the lever and finally bolt the lever back to the body. It takes me about 10 min to do this and I don't have to rebleed the brakes when done.

trailer Rails 07-25-2010 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
You have a wealth of knowledge about bikes. Are you or have you been a mech, or just a junkie?

Mechanic for the last 19 years.

PaleRider 07-25-2010 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flaco
Merckx is the greatest. Hands down. He won all three Jersey's in (I think) '69.

... he does get my vote :nod
(In his best year, Merckx won almost every other race he rode. Merckx won the equivalent of a race a week for six years)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Flaco
Maybe Anquetil is second to Merckx (although perhaps first in panache)... Bicycle Jesus is somewhere after those two.

:lol3

Dranrab Luap 07-25-2010 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Mechanic for the last 19 years.

Well that kinda explains it.:lol3

You just unwittingly volunteerd to be my advisor if I go through with this build.

TheNedster 07-25-2010 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
It is a pretty easy fix. first pull the grip and move the lever clamp to the end of the bar. Lay the bike down on the drivetrain side so that you can see down into the lever. Next unscrew the piston pushrod from the lever and unbolt the lever from the body. You will probaly need a piston pushrod rebuild kit (Less than $10). Now take the snap ring out very carefully. Use something to keep the piston from popping out. Now put everything back together starting with the new pushrod, then washer, then snap ring. All the while keeping the piston from popping out. Now screw the pushrod back into the lever and finally bolt the lever back to the body. It takes me about 10 min to do this and I don't have to rebleed the brakes when done.

:bow trailer Rails. Upon further review....I did as you suggested. It looks like the only thing broken is the washer. When the lever hit and hyperextended, it yanked the pushrod out of the piston, fracturing the washer. I've got snap ring pliers @ work and will swing by the LBS tomorrow to see if they have the appropriate washer (gonna trade 'em for the front der shims they gave me that were too thick).

Re: the rear rack for seat stay mounted calipers. Topeak makes one and it looks the business. I've been running one of their regular racks on my cross bike to commute. I load up with a lot of stuff sometimes (lunch, change of clothes, raingear, laptop, etc) and have had zero problems. Plus, I like the way their bags latch to the rack.

NikonsAndVStroms 07-25-2010 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
There are some bargain suspension forks on the market today that will outperform the good stuff from 5 years back. You could probably shop around and find a closeout Rock Shox Dart series for $100 or less. That fork will do all you need it to do and they aren't too heavy.

Damn this will be a huge jump for me then, the RST fork is a cheaper one from about 12 years ago :lol3

TheNedster 07-25-2010 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NikonsAndVStroms
Damn this will be a huge jump for me then, the RST fork is a cheaper one from about 12 years ago :lol3

I've heard good things about the Dart 3. I think Askel has one on his Kona 29er.

ducnut 07-25-2010 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Yea, there are a few options out there but they are flimsy. Most will be fine if you are only going to use the rack for light loads every once and a while. Any time I have put one of those adapters on someones bike that actually uses their rack, the adapter has broken.

That's good to know!

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
Re: the rear rack for seat stay mounted calipers. Topeak makes one and it looks the business. I've been running one of their regular racks on my cross bike to commute. I load up with a lot of stuff sometimes (lunch, change of clothes, raingear, laptop, etc) and have had zero problems. Plus, I like the way their bags latch to the rack.

Yeah, their stuff looks really nice. My old Trek bag attaches to its rack the same way as Topeak. Too bad they don't interchange.

Gummee! 07-25-2010 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I can NEVER manage to bleed brakes properly, so from a mechanical standpoint I prefer the simplicity of cable actuated discs. I also prefer the feel of mechanical discs.

They don't feel the same, and the mech discs don't quite have the same modulation, but...

...you can get a brake cable anywhere 'just in case.'

Avid BB7s = :thumb

With mechanical discs you can eliminate the brake drag same as on a hydro system. May take a little fiddling, but I've set em up quiet and true lots of times.

Off-road, I want simple, easy to fix, easy to scavenge parts for. :nod S'why I'm riding thumb shifters. Something happens I still have friction. That's off-road. ON-ROAD's another story. :nod

M

Gummee! 07-25-2010 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NikonsAndVStroms
I'm hoping to get back into cycling whenever my body is up to it as a way to rebuild the muscle loss over the 2+ years but will need a few parts.

I have new in the box V-brakes so I might as well use them, so the big concern is the front fork. I have a RST from when front suspension was just getting into the sub 500 dollar bikes so it weighs a ton and has no travel. What would be a good lightweight (keeping overall weight down to a minimum will be key) fork that has decent travel, enough for dirt paths with the occasional root or 6-8 inch ditch.....I'm looking for something that is as cheap as can be while still offering a degree of quality.

There's a fork in the flea market that's better...

Problem yer gonna run into is suspension design's gone long travel over the years. You can still find 80mm forks, but they're getting to be few and far between.

HTH

M

Gummee! 07-25-2010 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
"Gummee!" and I can ride sweep for whatever breaks/falls off your bike.

Up to and including you!

Pierce has ridden on the back when his RS broke.

:thumb

M

MapMaster 07-25-2010 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Mechanic for the last 19 years.

Trailer Rails,
What shop do you work at in da 'Burg?

Askel 07-25-2010 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
I've heard good things about the Dart 3. I think Askel has one on his Kona 29er.


I have mixed feelings on the Dart 3. Smooth as fucking butter. Flimsy as all hell. For smooth single track, I love it. When the roots and rocks start getting more prevalent, it loses it's luster.

I have a Tora 318 U-turn on my 26" bike though that I just love. When I bought it a couple years ago they were right around $200.

Askel 07-25-2010 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
I have been running hydro discs since about 1997. I have only broken one line and that was when I broke my frame in half. I never had any problems on the trail. Bleeding is not that bad and rarely needs to be done. I am a fan of Avid hydros, with their bleed kit it is very easy to bleed the brakes. You can get a Juicy 3 hyrdo brake for a bout $70. Probably cheaper than a BB7 and brake levers. The new elixir brakes feel awesome.

Ah, see- you just outed yourself as a mechanic. I usually consider it a win if I don't hurt myself every time the tools come out. For the ham-fisted bush mechanic, mechanicals are the clear winner. :lol3

Gummee! 07-25-2010 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
Ah, see- you just outed yourself as a mechanic. I usually consider it a win if I don't hurt myself every time the tools come out. For the oxygen deprived, starving, tired, sore, wet, cold, 'I gotta fix it so I can ride out rider, mechanicals are the clear winner. :lol3

fixt

M


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