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zippy 08-06-2010 07:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SeaBass
I'm curious as to why you wouldn't just strap on a 100 oz Camelbak and be done with it instead of messing around with bottles and cages?


For me my back gets too hot.

Mercury264 08-06-2010 08:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zippy
For me my back gets too hot.

+1

I hate things on my back when I'm riding bikes.

Oznerol 08-06-2010 08:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SeaBass
I'm curious as to why you wouldn't just strap on a 100 oz Camelbak and be done with it instead of messing around with bottles and cages?

I use a hydration pack when on the trails because the mountain bikes I ride most often have at most 1 usable cage mount, and because futzing with a bottle on rough terrain is a PITA and a good way to wreck. (Also they tend to get knocked loose by the jarring.) And bike handling is a bigger deal for mountain biking so keeping the bike itself lighter is useful.

But on the road, where drinking from the bottle is workable, I'd rather use them so that I can keep weight off my back and maximize airflow/cooling. Also, I'm not sure why, but the hydration pack feels a lot less comfortable in a leaned-forward road riding posture than in a more upright mountain biking posture

Eyes Shut 08-06-2010 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PaleRider

I'm not sure I am comfortable leaving clothes at the client just yet (dop kit, yes), so I'll have to take stuff back and forth. That may change as I see how the operation looks. [I still need to confirm showers/change room, a deal killer if no :deal ]

Thanks for the tips - keep 'em coming :ricky

As a long time bike commuter, I'll chime in here as well. Though I'm female, so some things of concern will be different.

Yes, as everyone has already mentioned, get a rack and panniers. So much better than a backpack. Your back will thank you.

Also, if you will be riding in the evening or at night, don't forget a front light and rear lights or flashers.

The bulkiest items I carry are shoes -- but you can probably wear your bicycling shoes for work. Some guys keep their "work shoes" at work (although it sounds like that's not an option for you).

If you can't shower at work, have some baby wipes (or equivalent) and deodorant available. You can wipe down when you get to work, apply more deo, and you should be good to go.

On the bike, I wear shorts in the summer and tights in the winter. For work, I wear a lot of knits and various cotton-spandex blends that take to getting rolled up and packed in the panniers very nicely. I change clothing in a bathroom stall. You don't always have an office to change in.

Bimble 08-06-2010 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zippy
For me my back gets too hot.

werd

I can tolerate it because I go through so much water, but it gets damned warm. I can't imagine how hot it gets for you in FLA.

Mr Head 08-06-2010 09:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
Works too don't it?!

Too busy trying to survive to think about 'stuff.' :nod

:ricky

I actually rode the road bike tonite. After I got my ass kicked in Ala Mon, I'm jonesin for a 'rematch' and would like to actually be somewhat in shape to do it. :nod I gotta tell you that there's HILLS in NW Denver! This is the route I took (with a few minor errors)

A little suburban for my tastes. I'd much rather be out in outer BFE riding with the cows, but ya gotta do whatcha gotta do.

M

Nice, next time take 128 out to 93 north and down the hill turn on Marshall, 170 over to Superior and back up the hump, bump and wall. Big hills.

I used to ride out and do laps there from south of Morrison off 470 and Hampden.
Try Downtown Denver out to Golden and up the hill to Buffalo Bill's Grave, then to Bergen park and up to Mount Evans, and back. That is a good bit of climbing.

Oznerol 08-06-2010 09:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head
Nice, next time take 128 out to 93 north and down the hill turn on Marshall, 170 over to Superior and back up the hump, bump and wall. Big hills.

This sentence threw me for a big loop at first, as the Boston area has roads labeled '128' and '93'. But both are Interstates, and kinda lousy places to go cycling. :rofl

YakSpout 08-06-2010 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
+1

I hate things on my back when I'm riding bikes.

+100

My wife rides with a Camelback, but I can't stand it.

VelvtRide 08-06-2010 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YakSpout
+100

My wife rides with a Camelback, but I can't stand it.

+1000

Jack rides with a backpack/hydration pack all the time - I just can't do it. My back gets wet and sticks to my shirt. Blech!

pierce 08-06-2010 11:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
I use a hydration pack when on the trails because the mountain bikes I ride most often have at most 1 usable cage mount, and because futzing with a bottle on rough terrain is a PITA and a good way to wreck. (Also they tend to get knocked loose by the jarring.) And bike handling is a bigger deal for mountain biking so keeping the bike itself lighter is useful.

:thumb

Quote:

But on the road, where drinking from the bottle is workable, I'd rather use them so that I can keep weight off my back and maximize airflow/cooling. Also, I'm not sure why, but the hydration pack feels a lot less comfortable in a leaned-forward road riding posture than in a more upright mountain biking posture
:thumb :thumb

you nailed it both ways. the pack sucks on a roadie because your back is more level, so the weight is straight down. in the more upright mtn position, the weight is more on the straps, and the pack is loose against your back.

SeaBass 08-06-2010 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
the hydration pack feels a lot less comfortable in a leaned-forward road riding posture than in a more upright mountain biking posture

Yeah, that would make sense. I only ride MTB in upstate NY and haven't used bottles in like forever. I've used the Camelbak for so many years it feels odd to ride without it now!

Mercury264 08-06-2010 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
This sentence threw me for a big loop at first, as the Boston area has roads labeled '128' and '93'. But both are Interstates, and kinda lousy places to go cycling. :rofl

You and me both :lol3

Javarilla 08-06-2010 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PaleRider
:thumb thx: Dahveed, Ozneral, Gummee!, pierce & zippy


The confirmation of a touring bike (w/ fenders, rear rack) as a commuter helps. Thanks for the link to Jandd, pierce - great stuff! I also like the reco of a randonneur bike (but I'm not sure I would be able to spot one or know how they are different?) Thanks to all who mentioned a rack. I can see why you'd want to be free of a backpack for several reasons.

I'm not sure I am comfortable leaving clothes at the client just yet (dop kit, yes), so I'll have to take stuff back and forth. That may change as I see how the operation looks. [I still need to confirm showers/change room, a deal killer if no :deal ]

I'll have to test the commute with current stuff (i.e., current bikes and existing backpack) and see how dedicated I am to this. The route would be very traffic manageble. Meaning there are side streets and trails for a nice portion of the commute.

As well, the commute will be uphill, both ways :lol3

Thanks for the tips - keep 'em coming :ricky

I use my Fargo as my commuter and ultra long distance machine. And my offroad machine. And my cargo bike. And my... It packs dyno lights, racks, big fluffy tires, fenders etc.. It's perfect. Streets, sidewalks, curbs, sand, mud, whatever - it just doesn't fucking matter to a Fargo. It would suck, however, to carry it up a flight of stairs.

I have, or will have, two rando bikes. One is an IndyFab Club Racer. Very sporty, but packing fenders. The other is a custom by this guy.. http://boxerbicycles.com/

Rando get you sporty, but not racy handling. Sporty but comfy ergs. Fenders, racks and lights. Racks front (french) or back (english).

TheNedster 08-06-2010 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
:thumb



:thumb :thumb

you nailed it both ways. the pack sucks on a roadie because your back is more level, so the weight is straight down. in the more upright mtn position, the weight is more on the straps, and the pack is loose against your back.

Plus, the nozzle of the water bottle gets covered in dirt/mud. :puke1

ducnut 08-06-2010 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SeaBass
I'm curious as to why you wouldn't just strap on a 100 oz Camelbak and be done with it instead of messing around with bottles and cages?

Everybody else has mentioned the exact reasons I don't use a Camelbak. Maybe on a MTB, but, not a roadbike. I can't imagine having that thing on my back 8-10 hours at a time.


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