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-   -   Bicycle thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150964)

EvilGenius 08-08-2010 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by neanderthal
I'm definitely down for pedalling, I just want to pedal there and back. With a lil assistance. Going back is uphill the whole way, and i'm dead tired from the ride to work in the morning, and work, the sun is in my eyes, its hot, etc etc etc

Sounds like a good reason to me.

Dranrab Luap 08-08-2010 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by neanderthal
Saw the most beautiful bike in a bike shop the other day and I went in to take a look at it. Of course it was Italian.

Of course it was a fixie.:2cry


http://www.torelli.com/images/torell...e/TipoUno1.jpg

I love the clean uncluttered lines of fixies and SS's. It's too damn bad they are hard to pedal up hills.

ducnut 08-08-2010 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier
Yes, Sorry. Running a compact up front. Hell, didn't think about changing out the front. Will have to look into it.

^^^ Sorry, I missed this post.

A 34T small ring is the lowest you can go on a compact crank. They have a 110mm bolt circle and a 34 is the smallest ring that'll mount to it.

You may consider swapping the rear derailleur to a MTB long-cage. That'll allow you to run the bigger cassettes like a 34T low gear.

Gummee! 08-08-2010 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier
Gearing question for the hills. Currently I am running a Shimano Ultegra CS6600 cassette 12-25 on my road bike.

If I go to a 11-28 or 11-27, will this help with the hills? Once I lose some more weight, and get better legs under me, I could always go back.


Thanks

Joc:D

What chainrings are ya running? :ear

That helps with the equation...

AFA gears, spinning is your friend. :nod Whatever gets you to the point where you can spin (vs mash) is whatcha need to do. Remember: over time hills don't get any easier, just faster.

I have a 12-25 on one wheelset and a 12-25 on another. The racing wheels still have the 12-23 on em, and don't figger on needing them any time soon around here!

If yer runnin 9sp PM me I may have a deal for ya. (I may not. I don't remember what my extra 9sp cassettes are! :norton)

M

edited to add: never mind. I guess that's whatcha get on an 8hr tour of the backside of CO on the MC!

Dahveed 08-08-2010 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
^^^ +1

Not only that, but, rear LED lights have no surface/reflector area. I don't care how bright an LED is, it'll still just be a bright dot in the distance. If one holds a laser pointer in the middle of nowhere, there's no indication as to what it is, even if someone can pick out the red dot in the darkness. There's just no surface area to the brightness, which is why there are regulations as to how large a taillight must be on vehicles.

I once came upon a bicycle traveler at about 2AM. He had 3 rear LED lights going. When I saw the blinking dots, I figured it was a bicycle, but, questioned myself because of the time of night. The average person wouldn't have a clue what the flashing dots were and could potentially hit a cyclist out of shear ignorance. 60mph versus 15mph is a pretty fast closing rate to figure out what the hell those blinking dots are.

Yeah, I've had a few of those closing fast and what's that on the side of the road only to realize it was a cyclist.

On my motorcycle, I personally strive for something that people might mistake as a UFO. I try have enough lights on so that people take notice. If I see people slowing down to try to take a photo, well at least they saw me. :lol3

Gummee! 08-08-2010 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I love the clean uncluttered lines of fixies and SS's. It's too damn bad they are hard to pedal up hills.

You'd be surprised whatcha can get up on one. My commute from Alexandria to Fairfax took me over some serious hills every day. I didn't have any problems getting up and over em in my 42x17 combo.

Yeah, I did that small a gear on purpose. Commuting fixie was a fall/winter/early spring thing and I didn't wanna mash big gears.

M

Dahveed 08-08-2010 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
^^^ Sorry, I missed this post.

A 34T small ring is the lowest you can go on a compact crank. They have a 110mm bolt circle and a 34 is the smallest ring that'll mount to it.

You may consider swapping the rear derailleur to a MTB long-cage. That'll allow you to run the bigger cassettes like a 34T low gear.

This is certainly an option. Your compact cranked bike will likely have a med cage rear derailleur.

Try the 11-27 rear first. It will help some while at the same time you'll be improving even if your weight loss is minor, you'll gain fitness and the hills will become easier.

Also, make sure your chain's in good shape and your brakes aren't rubbing. There's no sense in dropping some cash on gearing if you're wasting effort in other areas.

NMDesertRider 08-08-2010 07:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zodiac
So I haven't exercised in well over 2 yrs, seriously.

And I eat like a 16 yr old suburban kid, sleep like an air traffic controller, and drink like a sailor.

When I was a kid I was somewhat serious about bicycling, at least from around 13 to 18 yrs. I did club rides for my age group, did a few centuries, and long freestyle tours solo, and with groups. I even rode a Mtn bike when no one knew what they were. Then (as I got more into motorcycling) I went to running for a good 5 yrs. but that faded out as my lower back became worse (from two accidents, one car, one motorcycle),

So I'm thinking of getting back into cycling. I have a very good Klein mountain bike but I find it's not geared for city use (geared too low), and even with the thinnest hybrid tires, it still whirs as I'm moving along.

I'm thinking of getting a decent road bike, but not sure what "type".

I seem to be drawn to the time trial style bike, because of the handlebars/shifter/elbow pads. They seem great for cranking hard, cardio, etc, but they also seem too "trick" with the small wheelbase.

I'd like all you cycle nerds to help me out with advice on bike style, and brand. I hear they're all made in China now anyway, even Cannondale....

Thanks.

i have an orbea, made in spain, not taiwan.

ImaPoser 08-08-2010 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NMDesertRider
i have an orbea, made in spain, not taiwan.


You posted a reply to the first post, from over four years ago, just to tell us that? :doh

rajflyboy 08-08-2010 07:28 PM

Whats the best way to build a single speed bicycle. What kind of frame should I start with? Where do I find a freewheel single speed rear hub?

Any info would be greatly appreciated

pierce 08-08-2010 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rajflyboy
Whats the best way to build a single speed bicycle. What kind of frame should I start with? Where do I find a freewheel single speed rear hub?

There's three kinds of rear wheel 'dropouts' on bike frames. horizontal, vertical, and track. you can't use vertical at all for a fixed gear bike, it has to have a derailleur to take up the chain tension. or a lame single speed tensioner, but don't go there.

Take a look at this page for pictures of the 3 dropout types.

http://www.machinehead-software.co.u..._dropouts.html

now, find a road bike frame you like. I suggest good quality double butted lugged or tig steel 'club' bike from the better japanese builders of the 80s. I think its criminal to butcher a classic european club or racing bike. It has to have horizontal dropouts.

you lace up (or buy) a rear wheel with a flipflop hub. you can use any road front wheel, or lace/buy a matching front.

take the frame with the horizontal or track dropouts, and remove everything. many people grind off any brazeons for the shift cables, as well as the hanger if there is one. paint as desired (flat black is popular).

install whatever style of handlebars suits your fancy. urban cafe bikes generally have very short straight bars, sometimes other sorts. install one brake lever, and a dual-pivot front brake (unless you plan to ONLY ride this on a velodrome).

you can use a road crank, and mount just a medium sized ring, maybe 46T, in the outer position. be sure you know the pitch of the chainring bolts before you get a sprocket. you may need chainring shorter bolts, depending on your crank. You also can buy purpose built single speed cranksets too, of course.

sixer 08-08-2010 08:51 PM

Since moving back to CA, I haven't ridden my Redline Monocog 29er enough to keep my legs in shape. So I brought home my old GT Saddleback this weekend. Having gears is going to feel like cheating. It needs new grips and I either need to rebuild the Suntour M8020 fork or find a new fork. I'll post some pictures tomorrow.

pierce 08-08-2010 09:00 PM

little red pseudocruiser goes on sale... :spam
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/scz/bik/1888313659.html









:augie

TheNedster 08-08-2010 09:17 PM

That's a better ad than 99% of the $1500+ bikes I see on CL. Would it kill someone to at least list the damn frame size?

Gummee! 08-08-2010 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
That's a better ad than 99% of the $1500+ bikes I see on CL. Would it kill someone to at least list the damn frame size?

Personally, the TT is MUCH more important for fit than 'size.' That and ST angle, but WhoTF knows that unless ya have the original specs?

M


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