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EvilGenius 08-20-2010 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by artisbasic
my family owned a bike shop here in western colorado, w/some of the best riding in the country, both dirt/road.
one of the best bikes, the most bang for the buck too is the specialized roubaix. it's stiff enough for getting the power to the pedals and yet compliant enough to absorb road shock. look on craigslist for listings.

vital to get right fit, even 1 centimeter here and there can make or break feeling like you are 'within the bike.'

also, many riders are going to a compact crankset which is a double crank up front w/ 50/34 tooth cranks. rear cassette config is dependent on where you are riding. here in colo calls for an 11-27 cassette for 20 mile+ climbs over mt passes.

above all else, give yourself several months to be reeeaaaally easy on the knees with a cadence of 90-110 rpms. knee problems show up a couple months after damage is done-so patience!! get a 1000 miles on the legs before hammering on climbs etc.

i teach fitness, spin, nutrition etc as a lic therapist/life coach-past racing career etc and of the opinion that cycling can be a fitness activity that one can do until the day you die.

mt biking is similar-small, med, large frame sizes, and best kept to the dirt. cross-bikes suck at both dirt and road-best to have 2 bikes if you can afford it. enjoy!!

Thanks!

We were in Lake City a few weeks back and I saw some folks riding on the pass roads through and around the 11-12k foot mark.

Ya'll are nutjobs. :lol3


We don't have any real hills around here. The only ones I encounter on my usual path are somewhat steep, but less than 100' long.

I enjoy riding my cheap hybrid around, but some days I want something a little longer, more stretched out, faster, etc.

pierce 08-20-2010 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
It's hard to find a road bike around here.

At least at a reasonable price.

About 90% of what's on craigslist are mountain bikes.

Though I did find this.

But it's a wee bit pricey for me.

Shimano 600 is the predecessor of the Ultegra line of components. for a while in the middle, it was 600 Ultegra, then Ultegra 600, then they dropped the 600 entirely (except in the part numbers which were likely xx-6y00)

but that frame design looks far too new to be 600, unless thats a bitsa-bike. (bitsa this, bitsa that). there's some sketchy stuff in the pictures, looks like the back wheel is bolted on!?!?! and, those lotsa-spoke wheels don't exactly come on a newer 'compact' frame road bike.

pierce 08-20-2010 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head
Look at the components.
Shimano 600 or 105 are likely to be the norm in the price range you're looking at.
I'd look for a threadless stem since that doesn't date the bike back to the stoneage and high-buck vintage junk, I mean priceless art...:lol3

there are quality affordable steel bikes out there with threaded headsets... the 77 Trek I just got my kid is a really nice riding frame, was $220 on craigslist. of course, its a mashup of different parts, with a few minor issues, like a 135mm mountain bike rear hub jammed into a 120mm frame :-O

Miyata, Fuji, Panasonic all made really nice double butted cro-mo steel frames in the late 70s, early 80s that were very much under-appreciated, if you can find the right model of one of those in the right size, its well worth fixing up. catch-22, they all made lotsa junk frames too.

all that aside...

personally, I think EvilGuy really should be looking for a nicer hybrid, maybe an aluminum framed Specialized Crossroads or Cirrus (*), or a Trek 7.x, or whatever, from the last 10 years, something that will let him step up his pace, but not put him full on into a drop bar road bike.


(*) note, different years these model names were all over the place. I'm thinking of something with narrower 700c rims than he currently has, with better gearing, like Deore (hybrid's usually have mountain bike components rather than road stuff like Tiagra, 105).

Gummee! 08-20-2010 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius

You don't want that one no how. 27" rims

:nah

M

TheNedster 08-20-2010 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Thanks!

We were in Lake City a few weeks back and I saw some folks riding on the pass roads through and around the 11-12k foot mark.

Ya'll are nutjobs. :lol3


We don't have any real hills around here. The only ones I encounter on my usual path are somewhat steep, but less than 100' long.

I enjoy riding my cheap hybrid around, but some days I want something a little longer, more stretched out, faster, etc.

A cyclocross bike, perhaps? Most lower and mid-range versions have provision for racks and fenders. Geometery is less "commited" than a full on roadie. Tons of multi-purpose potential and way faster than a hybrid. I love mine. See also ducnut's posts re: Specialized Tricross.

pierce 08-20-2010 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
You don't want that one no how. 27" rims

:nah

M

true, thats an issue on the trek I got my kid too. a front 105 dualpivot reaches the rim fine. someone must have drilled the fork crown for the modern recessed bolt :-/ the back has a sidepull that -just- reaches the rim if I use modern shimano 105 pads. with the square pads it had, no-go. I should really take a small rat-tail file and elongate the slot in the rear brakes to give them another mm and it would be much happier. But the bike migrated with my son to Arcata yesterday, so I likely won't see it before Thanksgiving.

in the 70s, bikes that came with tubular aka sew-up tires will accept 700c rims quite nicely, but bikes that came with clinchers are almost certainly 27". The difference in radius is only 4mm (622 vs 630mm diameter at the beads) but that can be just enough to be annoying.

ducnut 08-20-2010 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Though I did find this.

But it's a wee bit pricey for me.

That is 1999 Once team colors. So, it's got some age on it for $350.

Also, that is not a medium. That's at least a small or XS. For reference, my GF's tri bike is an XS. You can see how short the headtube is and how angled down the toptube is and where it intersects the seattube (below the top of the wheel), just like the bike in the CL ad. Whoever owns the CL bike must be really short, as the seat is well below the stem and bars.

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...s/IMG_1137.jpg


Quote:

Originally Posted by The Nedster
A cyclocross bike, perhaps? Most lower and mid-range versions have provision for racks and fenders. Geometery is less "commited" than a full on roadie. Tons of multi-purpose potential and way faster than a hybrid. I love mine. See also ducnut's posts re: Specialized Tricross.

I agree. I always tell people interested in road bikes to consider a 'cross bike. They're perfect all-arounders.

Here's mine.

EvilGenius 08-20-2010 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
A cyclocross bike, perhaps? Most lower and mid-range versions have provision for racks and fenders. Geometery is less "commited" than a full on roadie. Tons of multi-purpose potential and way faster than a hybrid. I love mine. See also ducnut's posts re: Specialized Tricross.

Cool, that just makes it a little easier as far as knowing what to look for.

How far back does the 'Cross style bike go?

Will I be able to find cross bikes more than 10 years old, or is it a pretty new thing?

pierce 08-20-2010 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
That is 1999 Once team colors. So, it's got some age on it for $350.

Bikepedia shows this as the closest thing, a 1999 Giant TCR 2R, but there's a lot of differences.

http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...R+2R&Type=bike

http://www.bikepedia.com/Images/imag...R.JPG&f=Photos

http://images.craigslist.org/3n23kd3...9a77871c33.jpg

the paint is subtly different, the stem, the seatpost are very different. The 99 bike is 105, not 600 (which is a much older group, from the 80s).

so, I dunno.

EvilGenius 08-20-2010 01:37 PM

There's a bikepedia!?

pierce 08-20-2010 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Cool, that just makes it a little easier as far as knowing what to look for.

How far back does the 'Cross style bike go?

Will I be able to find cross bikes more than 10 years old, or is it a pretty new thing?

Cyclecross goes back at least to the mid 1970s, but in those days, it was done on a conventional steel race bike, with some modifications (5 speed gearing, knobby tubulars). It was almost exclusively a european thing, with only a few pockets of crossers on the left and east coast. First cross bike I saw was in the late 70s, it was a Bianchi Team frame (beautiful piece of Columbus SL/SP tubing with criterium geometry), with campy parts, and said single chainwheel with guard rings.

Per bikepedia.com, Specialized didn't start selling their Tricross until 2006. Kona's Jake the Snake debuted in 1998

dedicated cross bikes sold off the shelf are a fairly recent phenomena.

Gummee! 08-20-2010 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
Cyclecross goes back at least to the mid *1920s*, but in those days, it was done on a conventional steel race bike, with some modifications (5 speed gearing, knobby tubulars). It was almost exclusively a european thing, with only a few pockets of crossers on the left and east coast. First cross bike I saw was in the late 70s, it was a Bianchi Team frame (beautiful piece of Columbus SL/SP tubing with criterium geometry), with campy parts, and said single chainwheel with guard rings.

Per bikepedia.com, Specialized didn't start selling their Tricross until 2006. Kona's Jake the Snake debuted in 1998

dedicated cross bikes sold off the shelf are a fairly recent phenomena.

Fixt to possibly reflect reality. It may have been even earlier than the 20s that cross was introduced. I don't feel like looking it up right now, so there.

AFA cross bikes goes: yeah, they're a recent development in 'mainstream' cycling brands. There's been cross around lots longer than its been 'popular.' :nod Me? I'm glad its popular. :nod More people out riding = mo bettah.

That Giant aero bike is way new. That style aero post didn't come about till the last few years. Till 2007- or so, all bikes pretty much had round seatposts with maybe an aero section: see Giant's original offerings.

M

EvilGenius 08-20-2010 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
Cyclecross goes back at least to the mid 1970s, but in those days, it was done on a conventional steel race bike, with some modifications (5 speed gearing, knobby tubulars). It was almost exclusively a european thing, with only a few pockets of crossers on the left and east coast. First cross bike I saw was in the late 70s, it was a Bianchi Team frame (beautiful piece of Columbus SL/SP tubing with criterium geometry), with campy parts, and said single chainwheel with guard rings.

Per bikepedia.com, Specialized didn't start selling their Tricross until 2006. Kona's Jake the Snake debuted in 1998

dedicated cross bikes sold off the shelf are a fairly recent phenomena.

What should I be looking for to ID one?

pierce 08-20-2010 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
There's a bikepedia!?

www.bikepedia.com

it doesn't farther back than mid 90s.

scorpion 08-20-2010 02:18 PM

My good friend and bicycle riding partner was involved in a serious accident last night on the road. Over the bars at a high rate of speed NO HELMET
He's in ICU all f*ked up with head trama awaiting brain surgery. His wife is 8 mos pregnant.

WEAR YOU HELMET!


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