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pilot 08-30-2010 04:40 PM

Quote:

shift through all the gears, front and rear, making sure it shifts smoothly (don't cross over the two largest or two smallest sprockets).
Can you explain this crossing over thing, please?

Steverino 08-30-2010 04:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pilot
Can you explain this crossing over thing, please?

Never be on the smallest cog in the back and the smallest chain ring on the front and vice versa with the largest. Why? Excessive strain on the chain and sprockets. Plus that same ratio is duplicated with another gear combination.

pilot 08-30-2010 04:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steverino
Never be on the smallest cog in the back and the smallest chain ring on the front and vice versa with the largest. Why? Excessive strain on the chain and sprockets. Plus that same ratio is duplicated with another gear combination.

Gotcha, thanks. :D

How are the Motobecane bikes?

ducnut 08-30-2010 04:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
If don't really want to spend any more money and I don't plan on entering any contests or whatever.

Why would this bike be a horrible bike to buy?

It's better than what you have for what you're trying to achieve. However, the components are low-grade (7-speed is a giveaway). It'd be a throwaway bike if you got to the point of needing to replace major components. Probably, no worse than buying something off CL, for the same money, that's already worn out.

Quote:

Originally Posted by VelvtRide
Someone tell me about this bike, please?

Excellent condtion this 57/58 cm Road bike
Shimano Equipped, Dia-compe brakes
Weinman Double wall, sealed bearings wheelset
CST Comp high pressure Tires, (brand new)
New presta tubes, just tuned and cleaned
Ready to ride
asking 225 or best offer

As mentioned, and it could just be the picture, the forks look suspect.

At 5'6", you need something in the 52cm-54cm range. What you're looking at is going to be too long in the toptube. I'm 5"10" and that bike is on the large side for me. I had a 58cm and sold it because I couldn't get the fit dialed in; too stretched out.

pilot 08-30-2010 04:49 PM

I'm 5'9" with a 30" inseam. The 17 inch Specialized Hardrock fits me very nicely.

pierce 08-30-2010 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pilot
I'm 5'9" with a 30" inseam. The 17 inch Specialized Hardrock fits me very nicely.

mountain bike sizes are totally different than road bike sizes.

Steverino 08-30-2010 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pilot
I'm 5'9" with a 30" inseam. The 17 inch Specialized Hardrock fits me very nicely.

I always fit well on the 17" Specialized bikes. I am also around 5'9" with a 30" inseam.

ducnut 08-30-2010 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pilot
How are the Motobecane bikes?

I'd ride one.

Nearly all the premium bikes are made by two companies; Giant or Pacific Bicycle. They're going to be made in Taiwan or China, depending on pricepoint. I'm sure Motebecane is made in China, right alongside the lower-end Treks, Canondales, Jamis, and others. Other than exclusive, handmade stuff, Giant is the only brand to make all their own bikes in their own plants.

EvilGenius 08-30-2010 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
It's better than what you have for what you're trying to achieve. However, the components are low-grade (7-speed is a giveaway). It'd be a throwaway bike if you got to the point of needing to replace major components. Probably, no worse than buying something off CL, for the same money, that's already worn out.

Gotcha.

pierce 08-30-2010 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pilot
Gotcha, thanks. :D

How are the Motobecane bikes?

the real Motobecane ceased to exist some time ago.

My 1975 Motobecane Grand Record was a great bike back in its day... The race snobs looked down on it, as it was a long wheelbase touring geometry bike, but I loved it for exactly that. had all the right stuff, fully double butted Reynolds 531 (including stays and forks), classic french lugwork. originally, it only had some campy parts on it (derailleurs, shifters, crank, headset), but I ended up upgrading nearly everything on it over the years.

Nowdays, Motobecane, along with a bunch of other classic names like Dawes, Windsor, etc, are being slapped on generic frames from China being sold by the likes of bikesdirect.com

on these generic bikes, the brand is of zero significance, more important is the frame build, geometry, and components, and these have to be judged on a case by case basis. Yes, the factories making these bikes are the same factories that make many Specialized, Trek, Giant, etc etc etc bikes, but no, that doesn't mean they are the same thing.

Mr Head 08-30-2010 05:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VelvtRide
Not tall - 5'6", but the Le Monde I'll be riding tonight of my dad's is a 55cm so I thought a 57cm wasn't that big of a difference.

Thanks for the link and all the advice! :thumb

I'm 5'9" and ride a 54cm in the Roubaix. The Pinarello is a 56cm. The Italian is a racing geometry and the top tube is shorte, so it works, though I only run a 100mm stem.

Women have shorter torsos compared to men. Men's bikes therefore would require to be even shorter and run longer seat post extension but a nominal stem, to maybe shorter stem.

Upper-middle of the category bikes will be either men's geometry or women's.

5'6" I'd guess a 50 to 52cm frame which means sloping top tube.

These types of frames exist in alloy, and steel. Saw an old Epic the other day that reminded me of the women's team that used them back when they first came out, because the top tubes were shorter.

My personal aversion to French frames grew out of sourcing parts. French stems and seat posts were different sizes to Italian or English. Made it harder to find parts, not impossible but usually involved special ordering.
My Motobecane was a 22" and much larger than the Pinarello quite a bit longer in the top tube. Longer chain stays so softer and more relaxed head angle. More touring but not quite long enough to comfortably fit a baby seat back
there, but I managed. The Pinarello that did not work, but I could pull a Burley with two helmeted kids strapped inside pretty well.

http://cgi.ebay.com/VTG-Bianchi-Spor...item53e326f1fc
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4...deo27045-1.jpg

http://cgi.ebay.com/Trek-1000-Road-B...item53e3361b8f

http://cgi.ebay.com/Specialized-Alle...item2309a22e9c

This last one looks pretty darned good.

VelvtRide 08-30-2010 05:49 PM

Lots to read, lots to look at! Thanks to all that have posted.

Leaving in about an hour test the ride on the road bike. I'm kinda excited. :D

pierce 08-30-2010 06:04 PM

I second the emotion on that Allez on fleabay, looks good. 105 is a very decent component set. a new Allez w/ 105 would be well north of $1000 even if you got a steal of a deal on a 2010 clearance.

k7 08-30-2010 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
Jannd bags seem very nicely made and well thought out.

Thanks - will check them out also.

Gummee! 08-30-2010 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VelvtRide
Not tall - 5'6", but the Le Monde I'll be riding tonight of my dad's is a 55cm so I thought a 57cm wasn't that big of a difference.

Thanks for the link and all the advice! :thumb

I've been outta town (Portland-Tillamook ish) riding MCs all week, but AFA ''wasn't *that* big a difference' a few mm can indeed make that much difference. At 5'8" I'm riding a 54cm Top Tube (TT) frame. At 5'6" the BIGGEST thing you should be looking at is a 52cm TT frame. Anything bigger'n that you should just keep looking.

LeMonds are all wrong for wimmens' physiologies. :nod Look for Italian bikes. They tend to have either square or slightly shorter TTs vs Seat Tubes (ST)

HTH

M


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