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Askel 09-17-2010 07:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
That DT hub is an investment. It will last a lifetime and you will always be able to get parts for it. Cheep rear hubs have cheep freehub bodies on them. They blow out and replacements are not available.


Maybe for *you*, but it's a rip off in my book. :D

I can buy how many Deore hubs at that price?

A lot.

And how many of those have ever failed me in any way?

None.

And even if it did, how many piles and piles of deore parts are there in the world right now?

Eighty kajillion.

Shimano needs to quit making such high quality cheap stuff. I can't even justify XT when Deore seems to be such a rock solid standard of quality. :dunno

ducnut 09-17-2010 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I was talking with a friend who owns a specialized shop... he was saying 29ers were like the hot new thing this year, and everyone wanted one, even though for the riding in the steep forest terrain around here, a 26" is a much better choice, even if you're a big dude.. those are some big wheels.

I've had some naysayers, from the area. But, those who have them and ride the same trails I do swear by the 29er. We have some really tight stuff, but, the stairstep roots and ruts far outweigh the tighter sections. Most trails I ride are very improvised and not well maintained.

I've had two shops tell me a 4" travel 29er is like a 5" travel 26". I pointed out that they are confusing travel with the wheel diameter's effects. It doesn't matter how large the wheel is, you've still got the same dropoffs that compress the suspension and blow through a shorter travel bike.

This bike has an adjustable-level "platform" front and rear, whereby the suspension can be setup really tight and has a blowoff for the big hits. On the Specialized, it's automatic. I really like this concept and from those who have it, it works really well. So, it's not like it has to be ran mushy like older, long-travel bikes.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
that 10-speed stuff on a mtn bike, huh, the specs don't say what the chainrings are. its got an 11-36 10-sp rear, which is WTF huge low already, and the big ring looks -smaller- than the 36 rear. and the small ring is tiny.

It's listed with the crankset specs, 22T/33T.

There's no gear overlap with this setup, like there is with a triple. It's a simple matter of, if you're in a climbing area, you need to be in the small ring and in the big ring, on flat sections. There's really no need for the big ring of triple crank, as it's way too tall for trails. Even on the road the middle ring of a triple is adequate.

In gear inches this setup gives about 17" in low and 83" in high with 29" wheels. A triple typically has a 22T low 'ring with a 11-34T, which gives about 16.8" on 26" wheels. So, the double on a 29er isn't much different in terms of low range gearing. As "trailer Rails" mentioned, low really is too low. You're not going up anything that's rutted or rooted in low gear. You'll have no momentum.

The other advantage to no big ring of a triple is ground clearance. As I mentioned, our trails aren't maintained. This means trees lie where they fell.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I'm sure its an amazingly trick ride. nearly 6" of suspension, and a 3-position seatpost with 5" of travel, heh.

It's actually 5" suspension travel.

The seatpost has no suspension. It has a bar-mounted lever that allows the seat to automatically raise and lower with a flick of the lever. This allows one to run it at full-height for cruising on groomed trails, mid-height for going off drops where you'd be positioned rearward on the bike, and low-height for railing off jumps in a freeride setting. I don't know how handy that'll be, but, this concept is getting rave reviews in many magazines. Apparently, a variety of manufacturers have had these on the market for over year. I didn't know about them, until I started researching back issues of MTB magazines.

Askel 09-17-2010 08:18 AM

Apparently, the 29er "trend" is now over.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Thruster-2...-Bike/12961432


How much more mainstream can you possibly get now?

:lol3

Askel 09-17-2010 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel

How much more mainstream can you possibly get now?

:lol3


A little more, apparently. :lol3

http://mountain.bike198.com/wp-conte...esidential.jpg

ducnut 09-17-2010 08:39 AM

^^^ Ahhhhh quit! You're raining on my 29er parade. :rofl


Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
What is the purpose of the protein within an hour of finishing ?

Muscle rebuilding.

ducnut 09-17-2010 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
Apparently, the 29er "trend" is now over.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Thruster-2...-Bike/12961432


How much more mainstream can you possibly get now?

:lol3

Did you read the reviews on that beast? :eek1 That must be one hell of a bike. I'm headed to Wal-Mart, now. See ya! :lol3

Bimble 09-17-2010 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
Is a 'decent breakfast' protein (eggs perhaps ?) or carbs (cereal perhaps ?)....?

Yes. Seriously. Your body needs both as a matter of course.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
I can't ride on any type of full stomach. I force a banana down and I do drink during the ride and maybe force a goo gel down but that's about all I can stand.

Me either. I try to have my stomach settled by at least an hour before riding. Orange juice and granola works well for me. Before a race, it is low-bulk carbs. Smoothies work well for that.

Bananas. Ya know, those things have been sitting on my stomach a little weird lately. :cry

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
What is the purpose of the protein within an hour of finishing ?

TIA.

Actually, it is carbs and protein again. Your body is able to replenish muscle glycogen (a specialized form of carbohydrate) at a much much greater rate in the first half hour to hour after a workout. The greatest replenishment rate seems to happen when carbohydrate is consumed with protein in a 4:1 ratio.

After that period, eat normally and make sure you get enough protein (which depends on how hard your work out, body weight, and such) to rebuild the muscle you tore down during a workout.

For peak, optimum, super fanstasic results, there are tons of methods to achieve all that you are capabable of achieving. For most of us, close is fine and don't over think it. I usually have a bottle of Accelerade after a short workout (hour to an hour and a half) and Endurox R4 for longer workouts. I let myself settle down, then eat normally about an hour later.

A good, easy, home-made post workout drink is a yogurt-fruit smoothy or similar such thing.

But really, if you are riding recreationally, your appetite, assuming you eat well to begin with, is a pretty good guide to what you need.

Askel 09-17-2010 08:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
Did you read the reviews on that beast? :eek1 That must be one hell of a bike. I'm headed to Wal-Mart, now. See ya! :lol3


I keep trying to get a "claimer" racing class going with no luck. The idea is that we set a price- say $200 and you can spend whatever you want on the bike- but anybody can buy it off you for that price. Then do an assortment of different races and watch hilarity ensue.

I wanted to set the price so that a new Walmart bike was a viable option. Bicycle dorks rail against them all the time, but I know of not a single bicycle dork who has ever ridden one in the last 10 years.

I want to see just how awful they really are. :evil

Oznerol 09-17-2010 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
LOL, for once a trend is moving east to west. We have been riding 29ers since they came out. Go to any starting line at a local mountain bike race and everyone will be on a 29er. Go to any local group ride and everyone will be on a 29er. The only 26ers that are left are Free ride bikes and kids toys.

I can't say things are nearly that sharply defined, in my part of the east. I still prefer a 26er for riding in the woods, and they still seem to be in the majority when I show up to group rides.

I'd say that 29ers will soon predominate among hardtail and rigid riders (if they don't already), but full suspension bikes are still overwhelmingly 26ers.

Rad 09-17-2010 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
Is a 'decent breakfast' protein (eggs perhaps ?) or carbs (cereal perhaps ?)....?

I can't ride on any type of full stomach. I force a banana down and I do drink during the ride and maybe force a goo gel down but that's about all I can stand.

What is the purpose of the protein within an hour of finishing ?

TIA.

The trend currently is better nutrition early starting with a good breakfast, including protein, a couple hours prior to a long ride. 50 miles would not really be what would be considered a long ride.

The last few years there has been a change in nutrition from the total focus on the all important carbs to better protein intake.

The post workout protein trend has to do with replenishing what the body lost and it can be best utilized by the body in that first hour or so after the workout. You see this now to the point that there are even specific post workout nutrition products.

Stinez 09-17-2010 10:43 AM

Fwiw
 
I’m going to the first race in this SF Bay Area Cyclocross series, as a spectator, to see what it’s all about.

I’m not planning to ride it but it does look interesting and with the second race being free with a DD214 I may just jump in and give it a go. :dunno


PS IF I join in I’d put knobbies back on my older Cannondale for the race because I don’t really want to beat up my commuter bike.

Signal 09-17-2010 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stinez
Iím going to the first race in this SF Bay Area Cyclocross series, as a spectator, to see what itís all about.

Iím not planning to ride it but it does look interesting and with the second race being free with a DD214 I may just jump in and give it a go. :dunno


TAKE A COWBELL :nod

Stinez 09-17-2010 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Signal
TAKE A COWBELL :nod

:lol3
We have a few ranchers where I live so I'll ask around. :evil

pierce 09-17-2010 11:15 AM

my comment about the gearing was that it seems to be missing any HIGH gears, like for getting to the forest trails via bike paths, etc, as well as having what looked like a ridiculously uber-low. 33:11 isn't a very tall high, 700x56c -err- 29x2.2" wheel or not. my bike path special (a 700x38 tired hybrid) runs a 50:13 high, and I regularly spin the next gear, 50:15 when flatlanding, saving the 50:13 for tailwinds and mild downgrades.

Gummee! 09-17-2010 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
I can't say things are nearly that sharply defined, in my part of the east. I still prefer a 26er for riding in the woods, and they still seem to be in the majority when I show up to group rides.

I'd say that 29ers will soon predominate among hardtail and rigid riders (if they don't already), but full suspension bikes are still overwhelmingly 26ers.

It seems that it depends on whatcher riding... Out here in wide open country, 29ers make a lot of sense. They're not a majority yet 'cause there's a BUNCH of mtn bikers that've been riding for a while that either A. don't want new bikes, or 2.can't afford new bikes. :dunno

I'm at the 'break even' point for 29ers. I ride about a 17" bike... Size-wise I'd prolly be better off on one of the 650b bikes, but there's not a whole lot of tires for em. :nah

I can see liking a 29er if I rode one for a little longer'n I have. :nod I like the way my 'cross tires roll off-road. :ricky Wish I had more volume than 28c for the baby-head rocks that the closest riding area has. :tiptoethrutherocks

M


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