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-   -   Bicycle thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150964)

Mercury264 09-27-2010 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I've had good luck with the KAlloy $20 aluminum posts. geez, chrome posts only come on low end cruisers and BMX bikes.

This bike is 15 years old and in very good condition since....well it's probably done less than 50 miles it's entire life and 20 of them were yesterday :lol3

I'll try the beer can shim and maybe even a bigger bolt but if not I may try another post.

pierce 09-27-2010 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercury264
This bike is 15 years old and in very good condition since....well it's probably done less than 50 miles it's entire life and 20 of them were yesterday :lol3

I'll try the beer can shim and maybe even a bigger bolt but if not I may try another post.

grease the bolt threads and such so it turns easier. normally you grease the post too.

i had one bike where you couldn't get a good clamp with the bolt as it came, on this bike it was because the notch cut in the seat tube that the clamp went around wasn't wide enough... I got in there with a dremel cutoff disc and widened it, and didn't have that problem any more. when you tighten down on your bolt, inspect the clamp and see if anything is touching... if so, open it up.

MikJogg 09-27-2010 01:51 PM

my Quantec,a german brand,Cyclocross
http://i933.photobucket.com/albums/a...tdorf09010.jpg

Mercury264 09-27-2010 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
grease the bolt threads and such so it turns easier. normally you grease the post too.

i had one bike where you couldn't get a good clamp with the bolt as it came, on this bike it was because the notch cut in the seat tube that the clamp went around wasn't wide enough... I got in there with a dremel cutoff disc and widened it, and didn't have that problem any more. when you tighten down on your bolt, inspect the clamp and see if anything is touching... if so, open it up.

Got it :thumb

ducnut 09-27-2010 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MikJogg
my Quantec,a german brand,Cyclocross

Sweet ride! I like orange bikes. Just something about 'em.

Gummee! 09-27-2010 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Thanks for the lesson. :deal Maybe you should read the rest of the discussion that was taking place. He is replacing his shifter/brake levers setup and has the opportunity to buy v-brake compatible levers.

Last I heard, he was keeping em.

I miss something? :confused

M

pierce 09-27-2010 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Don't forget to mention that leaky rear shock. :lol3

it was rebuilt by a fox dealer, and it hasn't been used hardly since. :deal

if you pumped it up to 220 (within its rated specs, and the suggested value for my weight), it would leak like 10%/week when it was new, and 10%/day after a few years. I was told they should be rebuilt annually.

pierce 09-27-2010 05:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
Last I heard, he was keeping em.

I miss something? :confused

M

last I saw, jeffy was saying he'd change the brakes later. :loco I wouldn't, as he'd new brake levers too. me, I'd just do new cables (including the crossover cable if its even a little funky) and good fresh brake pads, lube the shafts, and ride it. :dunno

jocflier 09-27-2010 09:13 PM

Had no ideal someone made a shaft drive bike..Things you find on CL.

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/bik/1976686387.html

Jeffy 09-27-2010 09:46 PM

Got another question. I'm finding most tubes to be 1.95-2.2 or 2.5-2.7. If I get a 2.3 (although some say they're more like 2.1's), can I run 1.95-2.2's? I'm looking to get thick tubes. Maybe Slime (Thorn resistant) which a friend recommended.

And, yes, I'm keeping the stock brakes and brifters and freshening them up with new pads.

pierce 09-27-2010 10:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier
Had no ideal someone made a shaft drive bike..Things you find on CL.

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/bik/1976686387.html

there have been attempts since the first bicycles in the 19th century to do a shaft drive bike with bevel gears. I remember seeing pre-war fat tire cruisers with this wretched stamped bevel gear crank and a rusty drive shaft that was threaded through the tanker soft steel chain stay.

jocflier 09-28-2010 05:18 AM

wow, your are old.:lol3

Thanks for the information. Didn't know.

Joc:D


Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
there have been attempts since the first bicycles in the 19th century to do a shaft drive bike with bevel gears. I remember seeing pre-war fat tire cruisers with this wretched stamped bevel gear crank and a rusty drive shaft that was threaded through the tanker soft steel chain stay.


ladygodiva 09-28-2010 05:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bimble
Guilty.

:D

I don't have time to write much as I'm wrapping up installing a new garage door opener, but I'll leave it at

one starts to form some opinions about what is what somewhere in the midst of a gravel century.

Great riding with you again, Askel. I can't quite think coherently about Almanzo 2011, but the idea is wafting about in my attic.

:freaky



You guys are insane, but you rock! It was a blast waiting for you with cowbells at the finish. :D

I haven't had a chance to get the few pics I took off the camera but will try tonight.

Cheers you crazies!

Ps @ Askel: don't tell him I told you but ... Bimble is hooked :augie

ducnut 09-28-2010 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier
Had no ideal someone made a shaft drive bike..Things you find on CL.

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/bik/1976686387.html

I've seen an 1890's-1900's shaftdrive bicycle at The Old Spokes home in Burlington, VT. I didn't know anybody was doing a modern version. That looks like a really nice bike, for the money.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeffy
Got another question. I'm finding most tubes to be 1.95-2.2 or 2.5-2.7. If I get a 2.3 (although some say they're more like 2.1's), can I run 1.95-2.2's? I'm looking to get thick tubes. Maybe Slime (Thorn resistant) which a friend recommended.

Run the 1.95-2.2 size in a 2.3. More than likely, the tire casing isn't an actual 2.3", but, the tread hangs over. When you run a grossly undersized tube, the tube's rubber gets thinner as it expands to the tire's size. Grossly oversized tubes in tires cause bunching and wrinkle the tube. So long as you're close on sizing, you'll be good.

Don't run Slime in your tubes. When you do get a flat, you'll have the crap all over the place when you go to change the tube, on the roadside. Also, if you try to repair that tube, it's likely that stuff will keep oozing out of the tube as you're trying to patch it. Keep it simple with a basic tube.

Wadester 09-28-2010 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
Don't run Slime in your tubes. When you do get a flat, you'll have the crap all over the place when you go to change the tube, on the roadside. Also, if you try to repair that tube, it's likely that stuff will keep oozing out of the tube as you're trying to patch it. Keep it simple with a basic tube.

Living in the land of thorns (southwestern desert) I can talk to this one. If you have thorns, you will need slime or some other sealant. HOWEVER! If you run slime in a standard weight tube, you will indeed have the mess described. The sealant does not plug holes in a normal thickness bicycle tube, it just keeps oozing and collecting in the tire. You will have to run a THORNPROOF tube WITH sealant to actually get the tire to survive w/o lots of flats and fixing of them.

I know that this approach freaks out the weight weenies, but it does work. I would typically go a full year riding 2-3 times a week - but when it finally did die, I would have to spend a 1/2 hour pulling thorns out of the tire so I could put in my spare (lightweight) tube and get home.

If you want to go lightweight, and yet still survive in thorn country - you'll have to go tubeless. This is basically replacing the tube with a rim strip and a latex based sealant - but it is an "enthusiast" kinda thing. It takes patience to learn how to set it up, and you need to be riding your bike regularly so the sealant doesn't set up in the tire.


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