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Ridge 07-21-2011 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head (Post 16445204)

There is no shortcut.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 16448036)

Going fast isn't gonna come easy. :nono Yer gonna hafta work at it.

M

They speak the truth! :thumb

Gummee! 07-21-2011 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ridge (Post 16448051)
They speak the truth! :thumb

I'm still slow (comparatively!) I need to go ride with the fast guys more. I can barely hang on at 52kph (32mph) where I useta be able to move about the pack at 60-ish kph. :bluduh Not racing at the track sucks. :nod

M

jocflier 07-21-2011 02:22 PM

I learned something very important today. When adjusting the rear derailleur, do not use your finger to turn the crank. The end of my finger has finally stopped bleeding and now just throbs.:huh:cry:lol3

Man that hurt...

Joc:D

Gummee! 07-21-2011 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier (Post 16448416)
I learned something very important today. When adjusting the rear derailleur, do not use your finger to turn the crank. The end of my finger has finally stopped bleeding and now just throbs.:huh:cry:lol3

Man that hurt...

Joc:D

I have a nice scar on the index finger of my right hand from doing just that in the late 80s. Managed to get it halfway thru the front derailleur before the crank stopped. Couldn't pull it out so I hadta turn the cranks backwards to extricate my finger.

I watched in horror as my finger gets ground back thru the knifeblade that is the cage of my front derailleur. :eek1

To this day, if I'm building a bike or adjusting one that doesn't have pedals, I install one and use that. :nod Once bitten, twice shy y'know!

M

Zodiac 07-21-2011 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier (Post 16448416)
I learned something very important today. When adjusting the rear derailleur, do not use your finger to turn the crank. The end of my finger has finally stopped bleeding and now just throbs.:huh:cry:lol3

Man that hurt...

Joc:D

If it were a fixie you'd be missing a finger or 2....

peace to the digits....:D

jocflier 07-21-2011 05:48 PM

Thanks Z.. Glad to see you back in the saddle again.:clap




Quote:

Originally Posted by Zodiac (Post 16448970)
If it were a fixie you'd be missing a finger or 2....

peace to the digits....:D


Zodiac 07-21-2011 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jocflier (Post 16449816)
Thanks Z.. Glad to see you back in the saddle again.:clap

thanks, me too..:D

Gummee! 07-21-2011 07:57 PM

I went out this AM for a little over an hour. Came back completely soaked with sweat. ...and I wasn't riding hard!

Ugh

M

Mercury264 07-21-2011 08:09 PM

Some rides are about pushing hard and some are about just surviving. Thanks to this wonderful weather we are having, even a ride in the morning leads to a surviving ride. I sure was pleased to finish :lol3

Tomorrow I think I'll just use the trainer in the air-conditioned room....

Spicy McHaggis 07-21-2011 09:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head (Post 16445204)
Back in the day we started off with spinning a thousand miles.
Make sure the bike fits well. As your stress of training increases so do the chances for injury or damage from bad fit, or poor position. Get a little LBS fit/coaching. Riding with a smart, race-wise team, even better.
No big gears.
Spinning is how you go fast.
Stay out of the big chainring until you have your thousand miles.
90 to 120 rpm spin.
Then start hill training but, since you are in Florida, just do one day a week intervals is probably easier to find.
Ride for about 20 to 30 minutes at a good spin out to a flat mile stretch, a slight uphill is even better for this.
That is riding at your maximum for one mile. After the mile, spin so your heart rate drops back to a bit above normal but you are breathing semi easily and repeat. about 6 should put you in the bag. Light spinning the day after the intervals.

If possible train with a group, as a group you can ride faster, this will get your body ready. Legs used to the tempo. A group can motor along at 28 mph for hours at a time.

This also means road riding the bike path is a bad place to try for speed. It is OK playground for old has-been fat guys like me to pretend to be fit. :lol3

Kick the mileage to about 300 miles a week and you should hit the goal easily. I'm guessing inside of 4 months you'd be at 22 mph average over an hour or more. :clap

There is no shortcut.

Whaddya mean, back in the day? I've opened each riding season the same way since the mid '80s... spinning on a fixed gear for a minimum of 1,000 miles. Then I start my base miles on a regular roadie.

trailer Rails 07-22-2011 05:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 16448506)
I have a nice scar on the index finger of my right hand from doing just that in the late 80s. Managed to get it halfway thru the front derailleur before the crank stopped. Couldn't pull it out so I hadta turn the cranks backwards to extricate my finger.

I watched in horror as my finger gets ground back thru the knifeblade that is the cage of my front derailleur. :eek1

To this day, if I'm building a bike or adjusting one that doesn't have pedals, I install one and use that. :nod Once bitten, twice shy y'know!

M

I have one of these: Park dummy pedals

http://www.bikeman.com/TL8638.html
http://www.advrider.com/forums/data:...v760UUUB//2Q==

Ridge 07-22-2011 05:50 AM

Accelerade Lemonade = Two thumbs up! :clap

Get it on Bonktown if you see it come up again.

zippy 07-22-2011 07:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ridge (Post 16452699)
Accelerade Lemonade = Two thumbs up! :clap


local grocery used to carry to accelerade drinks already mixed and ready to drink like gatorade . I would feel stronger/faster if I drank one prior to a road ride. Of course the grocery store stopped carrying them. This is my excuse for being slow/weak now.:D

Mr Head 07-22-2011 08:48 AM

300 a week. Back in the day when I was smaller, faster and well, slimmer. It was 500 per week. Most of that alone. Only Saturday and Sundays were groups or racing. Once the season got underway, my mileage would drop because I was working as an official too much. But, I had this big base to work off, so I was fit enough to make three's and four's hurt in the hills. But, I was semi crazy. OK, maybe actually crazy but the riding kept me sane. Engineering school for me was a killer. I used riding as a relief valve. I required a good bit of relief.

Two years ago I was working about 10 miles from the house. I was up to 375 miles a week on the bike trails, both mountain bike and roadbike, (riding my old racer with a 52/42 and a 7-speed block).
Then I broke my ribs, then my job moved 30 miles away, then we started traveling 4 out of 5 weeks. I lost a lot of fitness.
2 hours a day during the week gives you 150 miles at 15 mph average. Add early morning rides on the weekends and you can get another 8 hours in. That's almost 300 per week. Step that average speed up and you're there.
Then more speed.

From the coaching I got in the past, from some pretty good folks, that first thousand on a fixed gear was key. Then the hill training and intervals. Riding with a group added the speed.

To this day I still chase anybody that passes me. just to gauge where I am. Back in the day, where I was riding, (Between Morrison and Boulder, Colorado) there were lots of I's and II's out there riding. I would end up riding for miles at a much higher pace than I had been used to. Then the next time I was out by myself my pace was increased because of getting used to that higher pace I had, had no idea I could do.

We also made it a point to get completely off the bike or anything bike-like at the end of October, and not touch a bike until New Years Day. During that time I would skate, lift, run, swim and pretty much anything other than ride. The 2 years I got it right I came to that first fixed gear ride on New Year's day lean and fit, and feeling really comfortable on the bike.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Moore (Post 16447845)
Thanks for the info. Man, you make it sound like work!

I usually spin between 85-100, so I think I'm OK there. I've been doing some 4 minute intervals. Maybe I'll try some miles and try to bump up the speed a little bit.

Did you mean 300 miles a month? Because that's what I'm shooting for. My old knees couldn't take 300 miles a week even if I wanted to.


Mr Head 07-22-2011 10:51 AM

BITD for me then.
My lifestyle no longer supports uber miles. That and the surgeon that re-modeled my knee told me about 20 years ago I was done racing.
Initially I didn't believe her. Over the course of re-hab, re-visiting her for more work, I came to the realization that she may have had a point.
I quit racing. work made riding all but impossible, and I gently relaxed into slowly filling up my cube.

My life has changed in the last few years such that I can again ride some. Not a lot, but some. The knee won't tolerate hard riding, but I can spin, and ride good mileage once I have my legs conditioned. 17% grades nullify riding the fixed gear with my aged knees. I view knee replacement as a last resort to mobility I do not agree that it fixes more than it breaks. I prefer to avoid that for as long as possible.
For me that means I can ride briskly for a few hours a day once I'm in condition. A process that takes about three months at this point. My goal for riding is back to 18 mph average on my own over varying terrain, (road riding), to the point where I can ride RAGBRAI pretty easily. To me that means I need to get to where back-to-back 100 mile days are painless.

To get to that point I have changed my diet back to closer to how I ate when I was racing, only not as many carbs and no where near as much food. I do still have a ten-plus hour day. I quit eating any meat at lunch and only eat fruit or veggies, or salad, and walk for 30 minutes to an hour at about 4.5 mph instead of sitting talking outside the cafeteria. I cut my portion size in half back when I was traveling but let that slide when buying meals. Now, I make my own and right-size them. I don't need a pound of salad, with meat at lunch. Oh, and I drink a lot of water. At first I felt hungry, but just drank water, and worked through it. After a while I got over it.
It is not an easy battle. Too many years of enjoying watching racing on TV, with a pile of chips and salsa, and a few beers is a habit that is hard to toss. But, I'm working on it.
Watching my riding buddy, Paul drop weight and seeing him ride away from me is a pretty damned good motivator.

While I was on vacation riding the motorcycle and eating good foods and drinking good beer, I still managed to lose 2 pounds. The discipline is there, I just need to keep it going and get the bike spun back up to quick and long.

Over the last month this has led to me dropping about 10 pounds, two belt notches and my heart rate.:clap
I'm 58. That ten more pounds will drop me into the middle of my BMI region. The waist will drop more as well, though I'll likely still need the same size pants due to riding, (froggy-legs):lol3

I figure that ten more pounds should be even better. And get me faster coupled with the riding. I really want to ride RAGBRAI next year.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Spicy McHaggis (Post 16451400)
Whaddya mean, back in the day? I've opened each riding season the same way since the mid '80s... spinning on a fixed gear for a minimum of 1,000 miles. Then I start my base miles on a regular roadie.



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