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dougfromindy 10-25-2011 09:03 PM

weight capacity
 
275 # weight limit on synapse, reading lots of reviews, phat people are happy with bike. Maybe need a tandem rear wheel?

Dranrab Luap 10-25-2011 11:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut (Post 17157301)
You're too heavy for either of those bikes. You need to be looking at a touring bike, as they have a heavier duty frame and wheels and can easily handle your weight. You can find them from $600 on up. bikesdirect.com has a couple at $500 and $600. Surly offers the Long Haul Trucker. Salsa has the Vaya and Fargo. Jamis offers the Aurora and Bosanove. Kona has the Sutra. There are more out there.


Nashbar has a steel tourer and a steel cross bike that are priced reasonably and speced out well. 105 level stuff and the bike is 15% off the $750 price tag with a break on shipping today. I think it's a very sharp looking bike.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_10000_202339

pierce 10-25-2011 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dougfromindy (Post 17157551)
275 # weight limit on synapse, reading lots of reviews, phat people are happy with bike. Maybe need a tandem rear wheel?

if you're 270, you really don't want to be on a bike with a 275 lb limit.

seriously, something like a Surly, sturdy frame, 36 spoke wheels, maybe even a 40 spoke rear (often called a tandem wheel). heavy duty touring rims that will mount like a 32x700c tire, or even a 38c. you'll get a more comfortable ride with your weight, the high spoke wheels have more natural 'suspension', and they'll still eat up the road just fine, albeit at somewhat less than racing speeds.

ducnut 10-26-2011 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dougfromindy (Post 17157551)
275 # weight limit on synapse, reading lots of reviews, phat people are happy with bike. Maybe need a tandem rear wheel?

A couple things:
Why are you so set on the Synapse?

If you were going to outfit the bike with a heavier rear wheel (BTW, tandems have wider hubs than either bike.), have you have priced one? You stated that you can get either bike online, which means you're shopping on price. You'll have way more money in this bike with a custom rear wheel, than if you just bought a more appropriate bike, to begin with.

Buying what has been suggested will last much longer, under your weight, than what you're looking at. People buy touring bikes and set off on round-the-world trips, with no component changes (other than maybe a saddle), carrying a 100lbs of kit. A jaunt across the US is ~3K miles. That's more miles than most anyone who buys the bikes you're looking at will ever ride.

There are inmates here with decades of riding experience, suggesting solid bikes, and you're not listening to them. The "phat people" you mentioned that are reviewing the Synapse, apparently, don't have that much riding experience on the bike and can't vouch for its longevity, under weight. Avid cyclists simply don't get big. Please don't take any of this the wrong way. The people in this thread truly do care about one's cycling experience. You're not the first, nor only big person here.

This is a great article. One really gets a sense of what this guy went through.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap (Post 17158275)
Nashbar has a steel tourer and a steel cross bike that are priced reasonably and speced out well. 105 level stuff and the bike is 15% off the $750 price tag with a break on shipping today. I think it's a very sharp looking bike.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_10000_202339

I've suggested that bike, and the bikesdirect.com touring bikes, to my MTB partner who's 6'4" and 255lbs. Trek just warrantied his Gary Fisher frame that broke at the seatstays. Unfortunately, he has a Scott rep (a fellow motorcycle industry rep) who's trying to get him onto one of their bikes, whether it's the right bike for my buddy, or not. The budget is sub-$800. There's nothing else, new, out there.

fullmonte 10-26-2011 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut (Post 17159939)
Avid cyclists simply don't get big. Please don't take any of this the wrong way. The people in this thread truly do care about one's cycling experience. You're not the first, nor only big person here.

Hey man, I resemble that remark.:lol3 Where does one draw the line at "big person"? Is my Specialized Roubaix gonna break under my 220lb frame? I hope not, because I'm really liking it after six months of ownership. Just turned 1000 miles on the odometer last night during a 35 mile ride.

Askel 10-26-2011 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dougfromindy (Post 17157551)
275 # weight limit on synapse, reading lots of reviews, phat people are happy with bike. Maybe need a tandem rear wheel?

Having ridden a 24 spoke rear wheel at 260, I can say it's doable if you're handy with a spoke wrench, but maybe a little frustrating.

Shouldn't have to go all the way to a tandem wheel. A well built 32 spoke wheel with a quality rim should suffice. Jamis has a tendency to build some sweet race bikes with 32 spoke wheels.

Just to play devil's advocate here, sure- a touring bike will give you lots of trouble free service. But if the frumpy practicality of it doesn't inspire you to get out and ride, it's not doing much good. Realize that it may cost you a lot more than just the initial purchase price, but if it's a race bike that gets you out riding, buy the race bike.

mud 10-26-2011 12:04 PM

I think I am coming down with a fatbike bug....:wink:

My wife would kill me.........

I watch this and I get kind of excited.

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/25396162?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/25396162">Lapland - snowbike expedition 2011</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/sportkamery">sportkamery.cz</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

I hate trying to embed Vimeo.

YakSpout 10-26-2011 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fullmonte (Post 17160021)
Hey man, I resemble that remark.:lol3 Where does one draw the line at "big person"? Is my Specialized Roubaix gonna break under my 220lb frame? I hope not, because I'm really liking it after six months of ownership. Just turned 1000 miles on the odometer last night during a 35 mile ride.

No doubt. I'm 240lb on my Roubaix. But I've been getting fluffy without as much pedal time. :lol3

Chisenhallw 10-26-2011 12:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut (Post 17156730)
No. I find that beads don't seat about the valve stem area.

Do you have the little nut on your stem? If so, pitch it. You don't want the tube pulled up into the rim. That'll cause bunching of the tube, right at that point, and won't allow the tire to seat.

If the rim was bent or out-of-round, you'd see that at the brake pads. And, you've already stated that's not an issue. So, that puts us back to the tire not being seated.


30 man-points to you, sir! The bike shop agreed with your assessment. Wheel mildly out-of-true, tire not seated properly.

In deference to your wisdom, I will now go & pitch my nuts. :huh:lol3

Gummee! 10-26-2011 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel (Post 17160097)
Having ridden a 24 spoke rear wheel at 260, I can say it's doable if you're handy with a spoke wrench, but maybe a little frustrating.

Shouldn't have to go all the way to a tandem wheel. A well built 36-40 spoke wheel with a quality rim should suffice. Jamis has a tendency to build some sweet race bikes with 32 spoke wheels.

Just to play devil's advocate here, sure- a touring bike will give you lots of trouble free service. But if the frumpy practicality of it doesn't inspire you to get out and ride, it's not doing much good. Realize that it may cost you a lot more than just the initial purchase price, but if it's a race bike that gets you out riding, buy the race bike.

fixt

Tandems went to mtn size wheels for their strength. You can do a 36h tandem rear wheel and it'll hold up fine.

AFA riding the Synapse: go for it. Just keep an eye out for cracks. You'll want to talk to your LBS about stronger wheels tho.

Link to pics of Sunday's race I'm in the green/yaller skinsuit on the Van Dessel

M

mud 10-26-2011 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 17163404)
fixt

Tandems went to mtn size wheels for their strength. You can do a 36h tandem rear wheel and it'll hold up fine.

M

Hmm, I think you have that backward.
Tandems have run wider hubs since before MTB's exsisted. And have been running 26" and 650B's well before MTB's were around..... MTB's took 135 spacing and 26" wheels from tandems would be my guess. Although, I can't remember when tandems ran as narrow as 135mm, 50's maybe.

pierce 10-26-2011 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mud (Post 17163971)
Hmm, I think you have that backward.
Tandems have run wider hubs since before MTB's exsisted. And have been running 26" and 650B's well before MTB's were around..... MTB's took 135 spacing and 26" wheels from tandems would be my guess. Although, I can't remember when tandems ran as narrow as 135mm, 50's maybe.

I dunno about the 135 spacing, but the pre- "mountain bikes" we were building on Mt Tam in the early 70s got their 26" rims from the cruisers of the 1940s/1950s. Tandems in the 70s/80s were pretty much all 27" or 700C, using heavy duty rims and 36 or 40 spokes, I don't think I saw a 26" tandem until 20 years later.

mud 10-26-2011 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce (Post 17164624)
I dunno about the 135 spacing, but the pre- "mountain bikes" we were building on Mt Tam in the early 70s got their 26" rims from the cruisers of the 1940s/1950s. Tandems in the 70s/80s were pretty much all 27" or 700C, using heavy duty rims and 36 or 40 spokes, I don't think I saw a 26" tandem until 20 years later.

You are right. The French tandems of the 30's through the 60's were running 650B's. I was mistaken about the 26". I can't figure out there the 135 spacing came from. Even back in the late 30's tandems were running 140....

TheYeti 10-26-2011 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel (Post 17160097)
Having ridden a 24 spoke rear wheel at 260, I can say it's doable if you're handy with a spoke wrench, but maybe a little frustrating.

Shouldn't have to go all the way to a tandem wheel. A well built 32 spoke wheel with a quality rim should suffice. Jamis has a tendency to build some sweet race bikes with 32 spoke wheels.

Just to play devil's advocate here, sure- a touring bike will give you lots of trouble free service. But if the frumpy practicality of it doesn't inspire you to get out and ride, it's not doing much good. Realize that it may cost you a lot more than just the initial purchase price, but if it's a race bike that gets you out riding, buy the race bike.


I rode a CAAD9 with ksysim elite wheels at 265-275.only broke one spoke in two and a half years on riding. I dropped some weight ,but was still in the 235-240 range never had a problem with the Bike.

I will agree a touring bike will be more comfortable and have less maintiance issuses, I happen to Love mine (Surly LHT) but that's me.

I kinda take exeption to avid riders are thin .I consider myself an avid rider at close to 4500miles so far this year. Even when I raced years ago I still weighed 210, I rode between 8 k-12k a year for about 9 years. I drink beer and I eat alot, A lot more than I should.I'm heathy and fit. and I have Fun on the bike.

My advice as always is find a bike you like and ride the wheels off it.

Gummee! 10-27-2011 06:28 AM

I'm trying to work up the motivation to go for a ride.

Its drizzly and 50-ish. The ride yesterday got cancelled, so its gotta happen today. 90min of riding with 4 x 90sec 'all out' intervals. Oh boy!

M


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