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Askel 03-11-2012 02:35 PM

15mph average over 20 hours is haulin'.

I only made it 25k today.

But I went faster than some other people so they gave me a medal anyway.

http://adamjoon.smugmug.com/Events/1...1DSC5621-M.jpg

It was an emotional moment on the podium.
http://adamjoon.smugmug.com/Events/1...1DSC5624-M.jpg

Or maybe there was some alcohol consumption involved. I forget. :freaky

If more people don't start snowbike racing, I'm going to need a trophy case.

ducnut 03-11-2012 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k7 (Post 18190481)
Yesterday, I did my longest distance at 400-km or 248.6 miles.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel (Post 18191692)
But I went faster than some other people so they gave me a medal anyway.

Good job, to both of you. :clap

I only did 39, yesterday. No medal.

However, in my 9mph-limiting headwind on the way out, I catch this dude at mile 17. He's rockin' a clapped, $128 (he told me) Wal-Mart MTB. Turns out he was riding to the next major town to have lunch at McD's and was going to head back. Said he'd lost his license and was out doing some thinking, as he tries to get his life straightened out. He was in sweatpants and hoodie and was frozen. I gave him props and rode with him, a couple miles, until I turned off for the gravel and dirt roads.

Aurelius 03-11-2012 05:39 PM

Santos trails
 
I've just come back from my first visit to the Santos trails. :clap

My first observation five minutes into the ride was that I totally suck at dirt riding. My second observation after a hour of riding was that maybe I wasn't all that bad after all. :evil

The timing actually couldn't have been worse, as there was a huge demo ride taking place with vendors tents everywhere, and it seemed as if everyone who owned or could borrow a bike was out there on the trails. Riders going in opposite directions, and of vastly different skill levels, had to fight for possession of trails no wider than two feet. Lots of unintended dismounts resulted, but by some stroke of luck, I managed to steer clear of the carnage. Fortunately that all came to an abrupt end when it began to rain, leaving only a few diehards like myself on the trial. I tried to stay on the yellow 'easy' trails, but at some point would up on a blue trail, which proved to be somewhat more 'challenging'. :eek1 Aside from the fact that I didn't fall once, my other surprise is that my bike managed to remain in one piece, despite the battering it took going over large rocks and exposed roots. I fully expected that my rims would at least be bent, but they came through unscathed. No cuts in my tires either - another happy surprise!

I'd hoped to pick up a few pointers by watching experienced riders, but while I had no trouble staying with them in the relatively straight sections, they disappeared as soon as we hit tight turns. Only once on my return ride did I manage to see something interesting. By then I had almost doubled both my speed and confidence, when suddenly a female rider blew past me. I could only watch in amazement as she seemed to leap from one banked turn to the next. I was as impressed by her skill as I was with her tire's ability to keep the bike from skidding right off the trail. Alas, a few turns later I completely lost sight of her. After a while another couple passed me, but at a speed that I thought I could match, so I stayed with them until one of them crashed in a turn. Luckily it was a nice soft landing and neither man nor machine was hurt. Unfortunately I discovered later that none of this was captured by my new Go Pro Hero 2 camera, as the plastic case it sits in had completely fogged up after only 15 minutes of filming. I don't know whether this was due to the cool temperatures and the amount of moisture in the air, but it's definitely something I need to keep an eye on in future. On the final leg of my return ride, I was pedaling hard enough to be out of breath at times, and by then I'd gained enough confidence to run right over the rocks and roots at a fairly high speed, rather than tip-toeing through them as I had been earlier. I even managed to get both wheels off the ground when cresting a small hill. :D I was soaking wet from the rain by the time I made it to the end of the trail, but considered doing another run nonetheless. Regrettably that wouldn't leave enough time for the two hour drive home before nightfall, so I reluctantly headed back to the car. Maybe next week I'll try the blue trails. :evil

Bimble 03-11-2012 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k7 (Post 18190481)
Yesterday, I did my longest distance at 400-km or 248.6 miles....

I was thinking about you and 'bents today while out tootling around. Congratulations. That is awesome!

... the watch changing time like that would have tossed me over the deep end.

Hey, what are you using for distance and cadence? I've got a Garmin unit that with my wife's 'bent trike I have to choose one or the other; the cadence/odometer sensor is one unit about the size of a thumb. The arrangement works fine outside, but is not helpful indoors on a trainer.

I put a VDO bike computer on my mountain bike that has an optional cadence sensor that must used a separate pick-up as the odometer pick-up is on the forks. I think that is the route I will go with her trike.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel (Post 18191692)
...

I only made it 25k today.

But I went faster than some other people so they gave me a medal anyway.

...
If more people don't start snowbike racing, I'm going to need a trophy case.

:lol3 Great job!

Rag is not too far away, eh?

I got in 43 miles today. It is good that I am just glad to be out, cos I is slooooow. Average speed was 11.2mph over 3 hours, 52 minutes. :lol3

ducnut 03-11-2012 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18193029)
I'd gained enough confidence to run right over the rocks and roots at a fairly high speed, rather than tip-toeing through them as I had been earlier.

As you get more confident, it'll get easier. You'll find with more speed, you'll "float" over stuff that a slower speed rider will get mired down in. Trying to "pick through" seems to be the biggest hang up with less experienced riders I've ridden with. Hang in there.

k7 03-11-2012 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bimble (Post 18193087)
I was thinking about you and 'bents today while out tootling around. Congratulations. That is awesome!

... the watch changing time like that would have tossed me over the deep end.

Hey, what are you using for distance and cadence? I've got a Garmin unit that with my wife's 'bent trike I have to choose one or the other; the cadence/odometer sensor is one unit about the size of a thumb. The arrangement works fine outside, but is not helpful indoors on a trainer.

I put a VDO bike computer on my mountain bike that has an optional cadence sensor that must used a separate pick-up as the odometer pick-up is on the forks. I think that is the route I will go with her trike.

I use a garmin edge 500. Nice unit but it dumps data after 10 hours or so. If anyone has a suggestion to offload the data without dragging a computer around, I'd love to hear it.

Aurelius 03-11-2012 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut (Post 18193674)
As you get more confident, it'll get easier. You'll find with more speed, you'll "float" over stuff that a slower speed rider will get mired down in. Trying to "pick through" seems to be the biggest hang up with less experienced riders I've ridden with. Hang in there.

I need to find some trails to practice on where I can explore my bike's potential without slamming into a tree if I push too hard. :lol3

Bimble 03-11-2012 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k7 (Post 18193886)
I use a garmin edge 500. Nice unit but it dumps data after 10 hours or so. If anyone has a suggestion to offload the data without dragging a computer around, I'd love to hear it.

I have an Edge and a Forerunner 305. By ten hours I've usually started another lap so haven't had an issue with data getting dumped. Batteries going flat, yes, but otherwise everything was there at the end.

Is that a solid ten hours on just one lap, or multiple laps?

Oznerol 03-11-2012 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18193898)
I need to find some trails to practice on where I can explore my bike's potential without slamming into a tree if I push too hard. :lol3

I grew up in north Florida, and a few years ago I rode Santos while down there visiting family. This was the result:

http://ericlorenzo.smugmug.com/photo...85_dV768-L.jpg


I didn't hit a tree -- flubbed the landing on a 2-foot drop that I didn't see coming. Honestly, trees have never been a problem. But I've shredded my forearms, knees and shins on the ground (mostly via low sides) many times.

neanderthal 03-12-2012 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k7 (Post 18190481)
Yesterday, I did my longest distance at 400-km or 248.6 miles. We started at 6 am and our goal was simple: finish in 20 hours in an event where you'll allowed 27. The temps were cool - around 50F. We traveled from Casa Grande to Gila Bend, north to Phoenix (Buckeye) and then traversed the valley to Queen Creek before heading back to Casa Grande.

Winds were reasonably light for the day. The worst winds occurred as we went from Maricopa to Gila Bend but luckily, they were from behind us. Towards the last 10-15 miles, we were pushing 25-30 mph. That was fun but my fear it was too much too early.

Gila Bend presented an opportunity for a quick bite to eat and then we traveled a barely used highway north to PHX. Spectacular highway that crossed an old iron bridge. We passed by Phoenix International Raceway and then headed into Buckeye... or was it the other way around? I forget. Buckeye is a beautiful little city - the drivers there were extremely accommodating on their 4 lane highway. The worst drivers were around 51 Ave in Phoenix and then those in the Chandler area. Lots o' red necks in pick-up trucks who can't be bothered to wait 5 seconds to make a safe pass.

Best part of the ride was the last control where a volunteer served hot soup - worst part was facing that last 44 miles after the control. The soup helped tremendously. We split it into two portions with a Circle K stop for a quick warm-up with coffee.

It's funny how the mind starts to play tricks on you. My riding buddy ask me for the time... it was a hour later than we expected. My watch switched to daylight savings which we don't do in AZ and I couldn't figure out why that occurred until this morning. Our motto was "Through by two" and we rolled into the final at 0150 despite my watch reading 0250. Average moving speed was just a shade under 15 mph. Highest speed was 38, average heart rate was 137. Max was 168 bpm. Average cadence was just under 80.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chisenhallw (Post 18190879)
Dude.

Duuuuuuuude.

Aurelius 03-12-2012 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol (Post 18194755)
I grew up in north Florida, and a few years ago I rode Santos while down there visiting family. This was the result:

http://ericlorenzo.smugmug.com/photo...85_dV768-L.jpg


I didn't hit a tree -- flubbed the landing on a 2-foot drop that I didn't see coming. Honestly, trees have never been a problem. But I've shredded my forearms, knees and shins on the ground (mostly via low sides) many times.

Some of those trees on the Omba trail are so close together that my handlebars almost come in contact with them. In one case, I had to go through at an angle. I think you either have to have very quick reactions to go fast on those narrow trails, or have completely memorized them. There's just no room for error if you blow a turn. At some point I got lost and wound up on the dreaded John Brown trail, which I'll make sure to avoid at all costs in the future. :eek1

<object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Om9FS3NJKeA?version=3&feature=player_detailpage">< param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Om9FS3NJKeA?version=3&feature=player_detailpage" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>

Gummee! 03-12-2012 06:58 AM

?Cut your bars down?

Picking lines and being able to float over stuff are going to help you go faster farther with less effort. :nod Especially the picking lines part.

[Retro Grouch]All these fancy FS bikes out there these days means that picking a line is becoming a lost art. After all, why bother if you just bounce over it letting 2.5" tires and 4" or suspension do the work for you! If I were given the power, EVERYbody would learn on a rigid bike. Learn to ride the trails first, THEN move up to FS.

Maybe that's why I like riding my cyclocross bike in the woods. :dunno See mofos! you CAN ride around here without FS![/RG]

Ah well. Different strokes and all.

I'm going out for an easy hour today. Get recharged for my last week of training before a week 'off.'

M

Aurelius 03-12-2012 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 18196541)
?Cut your bars down?

Sacrilege!

Quote:

Picking lines and being able to float over stuff are going to help you go faster farther with less effort. :nod Especially the picking lines part.

[Retro Grouch]All these fancy FS bikes out there these days means that picking a line is becoming a lost art. After all, why bother if you just bounce over it letting 2.5" tires and 4" or suspension do the work for you! If I were given the power, EVERYbody would learn on a rigid bike. Learn to ride the trails first, THEN move up to FS.

Maybe that's why I like riding my cyclocross bike in the woods. :dunno See mofos! you CAN ride around here without FS![/RG]

Ah well. Different strokes and all.
My Trek X-Caliber is a Hard Tail. :deal I'd hoped to be able to test ride a FS to see what the difference might be, but once the rain started they stopped giving test rides and packed everything up. :dunno

ducnut 03-12-2012 09:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18196112)
Some of those trees on the Omba trail are so close together that my handlebars almost come in contact with them. In one case, I had to go through at an angle. I think you either have to have very quick reactions to go fast on those narrow trails, or have completely memorized them. There's just no room for error if you blow a turn. At some point I got lost and wound up on the dreaded John Brown trail, which I'll make sure to avoid at all costs in the future. :eek1

Bars can be cut.

And, that video is the perfect reason to not participate in a group ride. That trail is not difficult, but, when you put a wide variety of skill levels together, you're going to have problems. Go with a couple buddies that don't leave anyone behind and learn off them. Take time to discuss how to conquer obstacles. Speed is your friend, as it'll help you get over stuff and really smooths your momentum.

Gummee! 03-12-2012 09:38 AM

Easy hour on the Full Tilt Boogie with road wheels on.

:ricky

Tomorrow: 3hrs with 2x20min cruise intervals
Wed: 4hrs easy to moderate

Thurs is gonna suck at UW Hockey! :nod

M


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