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rob feature 04-05-2012 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18385338)
Temps have already hit the high 80's here. I've got a feeling that bicycling in the Summer is really gonna suck. :bluduh


Yeah, that's when I'd be thinking road bike if anything at all. Mountain biking in the South in the summer is teh suck. Actually I found mountain biking in the South the suck anyway...trails are always wet (if you can find one open). And if they're not wet, it's too hot.

I'm pretty sure if I lived in Florida for very long, I'd sell my motorcycles and probably my bicycles and get another sea kayak. And maybe a motor boat. Bicycles? nuh-uh. Maybe in the Winter, but Flurduh ain't got no hills mang!

Chisenhallw 04-05-2012 07:56 PM

Bring me the heat. I was raised in the land of plastic seat sweat, baby!

Aurelius 04-06-2012 04:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rob feature (Post 18389120)
Yeah, that's when I'd be thinking road bike if anything at all. Mountain biking in the South in the summer is teh suck. Actually I found mountain biking in the South the suck anyway...trails are always wet (if you can find one open). And if they're not wet, it's too hot.

I've been riding on cool, dry trails for months. You must have been in the wrong part of the South. :lol3

Quote:

I'm pretty sure if I lived in Florida for very long, I'd sell my motorcycles and probably my bicycles and get another sea kayak. And maybe a motor boat. Bicycles? nuh-uh. Maybe in the Winter, but Flurduh ain't got no hills mang!
Having lived in hilly territory (NY & RI) for decades, I'll take relatively flat roads any day. All I ever got from riding those steep hills was constant oxygen debt and lactic acid burn, turning what would have been a pleasurable activity into an ordeal. And you can keep your hellish Winters, too. :fitz

rob feature 04-06-2012 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18391658)
And you can keep your hellish Winters, too. :fitz


You forgot the wind...gusting to about 50 today. It was gusting close to 90 not so long ago :eek1

And here we go with another wildfire :puke1

Summer makes it all worth it though.

Yer new ride show up yet?

Aurelius 04-06-2012 04:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rob feature (Post 18395785)
You forgot the wind...gusting to about 50 today. It was gusting close to 90 not so long ago :eek1

And here we go with another wildfire :puke1

Summer makes it all worth it though.

Yer new ride show up yet?

Yep. Just in from test riding it around in the back yard. :bow:bow:bow:wings

Donkey Hotey 04-08-2012 01:31 PM

Help a bicycle idiot out
 
I bought another Amp Research bicycle yesterday (pics later). It needs all new cables.

  • Don't mind buying a proper cable sheath cutter.
  • Don't mind buying a crimping tool if necessary.
  • Don't care if I spend $100 on cables.

What is the ticket for really premium cables? An Ebay search netted Jagwire brand kits. They seem to look OK but don't talk about much other than colors. Not sure if there are some better lined cables (lower friction) or something that uses prestretched center wire. Maybe better ferrules--cast or machined instead of sheet metal? Stainless wire? I've noticed that shifters and brakes now use different sheaths (compressionless for the shifters). I can't imagine that guys are running $10 cable sets on $5K bicycles.

The boots and most of the miscellaneous hardware is reusable but, the rear brake cable is so frayed, it's almost broken . The bike has Shimano XT shifters (if that makes any difference) and cable operated disk brakes that terminate like this (cable actuated, hydraulic caliper):
http://www.cifumotorsports.com/ak/mercedesamp/04.jpg

Wadester 04-08-2012 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donkey Hotey (Post 18408594)
I bought another Amp Research bicycle yesterday (pics later). It needs all new cables.

  • Don't mind buying a proper cable sheath cutter.
  • Don't mind buying a crimping tool if necessary.
  • Don't care if I spend $100 on cables.

What is the ticket for really premium cables? An Ebay search netted Jagwire brand kits. They seem to look OK but don't talk about much other than colors. Not sure if there are some better lined cables (lower friction) or something that uses prestretched center wire. Maybe better ferrules--cast or machined instead of sheet metal? Stainless wire? I've noticed that shifters and brakes now use different sheaths (compressionless for the shifters). I can't imagine that guys are running $10 cable sets on $5K bicycles.

The boots and most of the miscellaneous hardware is reusable but, the rear brake cable is so frayed, it's almost broken . The bike has Shimano XT shifters (if that makes any difference) and cable operated disk brakes that terminate like this (cable actuated, hydraulic caliper):

Go to the best source: http://sheldonbrown.com/cables.html
Also, most decent cable housings are polyethylene lined and very slick - so much that I find it better to not lube them and avoid dirt contamination. Jagwire has the cool appearance thing covered.

You want more bling? Nokon (in article) is that. For a sealed system, go to Gore Ride-On cable kits. They're just basic black, but they will keep out wet crud well.

Fancy ferrules for the ends? How 'bout ano aluminum? http://www.purelycustom.com/c-84-cab...-ferrules.aspx I don't know of any other fancy ones, but they're probably out there.

Chisenhallw 04-08-2012 03:38 PM

I put jagwire on my new racing bike. I like jagwire.

Oznerol 04-08-2012 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18391658)
Having lived in hilly territory (NY & RI) for decades, I'll take relatively flat roads any day. All I ever got from riding those steep hills was constant oxygen debt and lactic acid burn, turning what would have been a pleasurable activity into an ordeal.

Man, hills are most of why I ride. I don't always love the climbs, but often I do, and I'm always willing to pay the price for the sense of accomplishment (and hopefully a good view) at the top, and a fun rollercoaster descent (paved or dirt).

I just did 37 miles through the Santa Cruz mountains. About 4500 feet of climbing. I hit my highest point of elevation at mile 17. Most of the remaining 20 miles was spent carving my way down these beautifully engineered twisties at moto speeds, grinning and giggling like an idiot. This place is going to turn me into a roadie.

Gummee! 04-08-2012 07:15 PM

For braking, not much is better than Yokozuna Reaction cables. Basically they're spiral wound like shifter cables so they don't compress.

AFA slick, Gore cables.

AFA fancy ferrules, the Gore stuff comes with AL ferrules. That's about as fancy as it gets.

Me? I was running sag all weekend for a training camp. Not much riding went on. :cry ...BUT I did find a few more roads that are good riding roads. IDK if there's a Skymass loop in mapmyride.com but the only day I wasn't jealous was that ride. I'll probably still end up doing it just to say I've done it. In short: up Skyline Dr. down 211 up and over ?Masanutten mtn? and back down, rolly back to Front Royal. 82mi on the day. Ugh. Masanutten Mtn reminded me of the hills around Blacksburg. Steep AND long.

M

Donkey Hotey 04-08-2012 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wadester (Post 18408854)
Go to the best source: http://sheldonbrown.com/cables.html
Also, most decent cable housings are polyethylene lined and very slick - so much that I find it better to not lube them and avoid dirt contamination. Jagwire has the cool appearance thing covered.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chisenhallw (Post 18409127)
I put jagwire on my new racing bike. I like jagwire.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 18410742)
For braking, not much is better than Yokozuna Reaction cables. Basically they're spiral wound like shifter cables so they don't compress.

Good tips, guys. :thumb That gives me some places to read-up and learn. I'm going to tear the bike down the frame, inspect, lube and polish everything and build it back up right.

yater 04-08-2012 11:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wadester (Post 18408854)
Go to the best source: http://sheldonbrown.com/cables.html
Also, most decent cable housings are polyethylene lined and very slick - so much that I find it better to not lube them and avoid dirt contamination. Jagwire has the cool appearance thing covered.

You want more bling? Nokon (in article) is that. For a sealed system, go to Gore Ride-On cable kits. They're just basic black, but they will keep out wet crud well.

Fancy ferrules for the ends? How 'bout ano aluminum? http://www.purelycustom.com/c-84-cab...-ferrules.aspx I don't know of any other fancy ones, but they're probably out there.

Is this "Wadesta" who races in Tx sometimes?

Askel 04-09-2012 03:43 AM

Got the Fargo done this weekend.

Fresh and unmolested, ready to head out yesterday morning:

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5454/6...2bf5e273_z.jpg

Stopping for glamor shots:

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5271/7...58e7cdcb_z.jpg

First impressions, this thing does not ride at all like I expected. I guess I was sort of expecting it to be a lightweight, flexy frame. This thing is a motherfucking tank. It's meant to be loaded up for touring.

Also, trekking chainrings and a MTB cassette are *not* gravel road racing appropriate. The jumps between gears are just way too big. Really need a road casette. Going with 8 speed just exacerbates the problem. Plus those bar cons way out there on the ends of those woodchippers are a bit of a reach.

What this bike loves though is playing "Where Does That Go?"
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5321/6...3b17e656_z.jpg

Yes, there's a trail there. And I rode down it. Couldn't quite make it back up though. :D

It's also the best two tracking bike I've ridden yet. I could ride this stuff all day.
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5327/6...8fc538c0_z.jpg

Riding some Ottawa Slickrock on Silver Mountain.
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5315/7...f3e48634_z.jpg

The summit:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7075/6...82286a15_z.jpg

The silver mine for which the mountain is named:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5235/6...5731a838_z.jpg

Took a turn onto the north country trail. Which is technically not allowed. But in all the years I've hiked it, I've never seen anybody on it. And many portions are overgrown to the point of being near impossible to follow. And I've got a whole list of rationalizations for biking where I'm not supposed to if you want to hear them.... :lol3

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5238/7...201f24b6_z.jpg

But brushfires had recently scorched the Baraga Plains. So it wasn't long before I was humping the bike over all kinds of deadfall leaving me covered in small cuts and ash. Karma's a bitch. :lol3

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5156/7...a5d6d4b3_z.jpg

And then I discovered my barcons had come loose.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7080/6...78538469_z.jpg

Did I mention this was going to be an easy ~75 mile gravel loop just to shake down the bike? Damn Fargo wanting to go down every little two track...

At this point I was out of food and water and had to high tail it to the nearest town to restock.

8 hours in and I still had a solid 20 miles left to get home. But I still couldn't stop checking out new trails. Found this old railroad grade that spans many miles.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5076/6...b0f2aa11_z.jpg

Stuff like this keeps the ATVs off it, so I had the trail to myself.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7099/7...1815b1aa_z.jpg

Finally back home. Other than the loose shifters, no issues after some serious abuse.
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5114/7...def33bc1_z.jpg

No idea how many miles I did, but after 10 hours- I hurt far more this morning than I did after a paved 150 miler I did a few weeks ago.

Gonna have fun with that bike this summer. Thanks Oznerol!

Chisenhallw 04-09-2012 05:17 AM

The wheels on your Fargo are bigger than the wheels of your car. :lol3

Aurelius 04-09-2012 05:49 AM

First outing on my new Trek Superlfy 100
 
So after having gotten acquainted with the bike on a local trail, I decided to drive up to Ocala to ride the trails at Santos. The first time I was up there a few weeks ago, I stayed on the easy yellow trails, parts of which I thought were a bit challenging. This time around, they were ridiculously easy. But at some point during the ride I became aware of a creaking sound coming from my bike that got progressively louder as I made my way back to the entrance. Fearing the worst (a cracked frame), I headed back to the parking lot. Unfortunately the bike shop right across the street was closed for Easter Sunday, but there were few riders loading up their bikes outside, so I asked one of them if he could determine where the noise was coming from while I compressed the suspension. There was nothing plainly visible on the left side, but when he moved around to the right, he noticed that one of the bolts that hold the rear shock in place had backed out half way. :eek1 Had I kept riding the bike, it likely would have popped out completely. It was my good fortune that this fellow happened to be Ben Mays, a mountain bike instructor. He not only managed to do the repairs (I had no tools with me), but made a number of adjustments to the suspension, which he said were out of whack for someone of my weight. Not sure what he did, but the bike felt MUCH more compliant after that. I mentioned being somewhat of a n00b to off road riding, so he showed me some basic skills, after which I followed him to the blue trails. These weren't all that difficult for me except in a couple of sections, so on we went to the Vortex red trails. I had no idea what I was in for. There are parts of this trail which looked completely impassible to me. If I hadn't seen Ben do it, it never would have occurred to me to try to scale those steep rocky hills, or go down the other side, which was even scarier. I've regained a lot of my former leg strength by pumping iron at the gym, but quickly discovered that brute strength is no substitute for skill when it comes to hill climbing, as I nearly wheelied over backward while powering up a steep slope, and then almost went over the handlebars on the decent. I was never so glad to get out of there. :knary

Here's a video I found showing what the Vortex trail looks like, though it's difficult to appreciate just how steep those hills are unless you're standing there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=zN94j-AuJPk


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