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Chisenhallw 05-28-2012 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brewer90 (Post 18784605)
Spend the extra $100 and get a 29er.

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._trail_xii.htm

Many wise people have said that it's important to learn to pick a line and negotiate obstacles with a 26er first. Then go to 29.

Aurelius 05-28-2012 07:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chisenhallw (Post 18786909)
Many wise people have said that it's important to learn to pick a line and negotiate obstacles with a 26er first. Then go to 29.

I've got one of each. I've read all the alleged advantages of the 29er's over 26er's, but I've been unable to prove any of them in practice. I've seen no noticeable advantage in climbing or stability or better traction over my 26er. My suspicion is that they're simply too small to be measured in anything but 'laboratory conditions'. What is instantly apparent however, is that my 26er is quicker through the turns, accelerates and stops faster than the 29er, and just feels a lot more lively and fun to ride aggressively. And the differences in these respects are by no means subtle.

k7 05-28-2012 09:33 PM

Riding with old guys. Old, fast guys.
 
Link

Did a nice 41 mile ride today. I leave the Garmin trip timer running all the time - look at the speeds after the rest stop...it's where the speed flat-lines for 15 minutes or so. From that point on, we were basically at 25 mph or faster. Everyone was dropped out of 15 or so in this group except for three diamond-frame riders, me and my buddy David, also on a recumbent. Well, David was dropped in the last mile.

Even more remarkable were the ages of the riders.... the other three were in their last 50's to mid-60's. David is a few years younger than me.

Our moving average was a bit under 20. Given that it was an urban ride with a ton of lights, we did pretty good!

Aurelius 05-29-2012 06:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k7 (Post 18787658)
Link

Did a nice 41 mile ride today. I leave the Garmin trip timer running all the time - look at the speeds after the rest stop...it's where the speed flat-lines for 15 minutes or so. From that point on, we were basically at 25 mph or faster. Everyone was dropped out of 15 or so in this group except for three diamond-frame riders, me and my buddy David, also on a recumbent. Well, David was dropped in the last mile.

Even more remarkable were the ages of the riders.... the other three were in their last 50's to mid-60's. David is a few years younger than me.

Our moving average was a bit under 20. Given that it was an urban ride with a ton of lights, we did pretty good!

That's another reason I'm giving up road riding. I don't think it's at all fair that riders much older than me are able to ride faster. At least on the mtb trails, I'm the oldest one out there, and in the rare instances where someone does pass me on the trail, I can always use the excuse that he's half my age. :thumb

ducnut 05-29-2012 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18787070)
I've got one of each. I've read all the alleged advantages of the 29er's over 26er's, but I've been unable to prove any of them in practice. I've seen no noticeable advantage in climbing or stability or better traction over my 26er. My suspicion is that they're simply too small to be measured in anything but 'laboratory conditions'.

I think a lot of that has to do with riding style, experience, and terrain. Up here, everyone sees a noticeable difference in what a 29er can do. The two regulars who ride with me, saw it on the very first time I went out on my 29er. As you may recall, I've ridden the trails you ride. There's a noticeable difference in the sugar sand and rooted areas.

Also, you're comparing a long-travel 26" (plush-absorbs it all and has a totally different suspension design from your 29er) to a XC 29er (tighter ride). I think if you compared like bikes, with the same suspension design and travel, rode at a faster pace, rode more challenging terrain (more mountainous area), you'd see the difference. I'm not putting down your capabilities, let me be clear about that.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18787070)
What is instantly apparent however, is that my 26er is quicker through the turns, accelerates and stops faster than the 29er, and just feels a lot more lively and fun to ride aggressively. And the differences in these respects are by no means subtle.

I'll agree with that. I kept my 26" for a while, before letting it go. But, everytime I grabbed a MTB, I took my 29er. I do miss the lively ride of my 26", though.

Aurelius 05-29-2012 08:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut (Post 18789542)
I think a lot of that has to do with riding style, experience, and terrain. Up here, everyone sees a noticeable difference in what a 29er can do. The two regulars who ride with me, saw it on the very first time I went out on my 29er. As you may recall, I've ridden the trails you ride. There's a noticeable difference in the sugar sand and rooted areas.

I think I can say pretty confidently that I've ridden these two bikes on every kind of terrain one can find in the area: little rocks, huge boulders, small and large roots, sugar sand, hard packed dirt, steep climbs and descents, and even through grassy fields. I've also had two very experienced riders (Ben Mays, who runs a mtb training school, and Dave, a former BMX racer) do back to back tests, and both came away with exactly the same impressions I have. Neither could say for sure whether the 29er was indeed faster over all, but both said without the slightest reservation that it felt slow and sluggish compared to the 26er.

Quote:

Also, you're comparing a long-travel 26" (plush-absorbs it all and has a totally different suspension design from your 29er) to a XC 29er (tighter ride). I think if you compared like bikes, with the same suspension design and travel, rode at a faster pace, rode more challenging terrain (more mountainous area), you'd see the difference.
I'm not aware of any 29ers with 6" of shock travel, so I don't know how such a comparison could be made. I'm told that 29ers typically have less shock travel because their larger wheels roll over objects more easily. That would still mean however, that a 29er with 4" of shock travel would be less effective at absorbing hits when going off drops than a 26er with a full 6" of shock travel.

Quote:

I'm not putting down your capabilities, let me be clear about that.
It would be a perfectly legitimate point if you did. Rider skill is obviously going to determine to some extent how the bike behaves. Long travel suspension may make up for imperfectly timed landings, for instance - something an expert rider may not experience at all. A 26er, which allows the rider to make more rapid adjustments in speed when entering corners or when climbing steep slopes, is going to be more forgiving in instances where I'm either carrying too much velocity or too little. I also find it much easier to make rapid course adjustments, which pays big dividends when racing up a slope and not knowing which way the trail will turn as I reach the top. A more experienced rider would be familiar with these trails and have chosen his entry perfectly to avoid any surprises. Yet the fact that a 26er enables me to make up for these kinds of mistakes is something I would say counts for it rather than against it. :dunno

Blur 05-29-2012 09:42 AM

Sad day in Charlotte today :cry

http://www.wcnc.com/news/local/Accid...155297615.html

enjine 05-29-2012 01:10 PM

Trek DS 8.3
 
Just picked this up today. I have been out of bike riding for years but the area where I live has lots of great roads and paths. This bike should be perfect for the kind of riding I do.

My R1100R and XR400 will handle everything else.

http://mechanical-bull.com/stuffs/ds_8-3.jpg

brewer90 05-29-2012 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 18787070)
I've got one of each. I've read all the alleged advantages of the 29er's over 26er's, but I've been unable to prove any of them in practice. I've seen no noticeable advantage in climbing or stability or better traction over my 26er. My suspicion is that they're simply too small to be measured in anything but 'laboratory conditions'. What is instantly apparent however, is that my 26er is quicker through the turns, accelerates and stops faster than the 29er, and just feels a lot more lively and fun to ride aggressively. And the differences in these respects are by no means subtle.

I'm faster on my 29er than on my 26er on my timed route that I've been riding for four years. I also climb better on it and clear a lot of rocky ledge climbs that I never could before it. I broke my rear derailleur on my Niner and went back to my Yeti 26er and didn't like it. I sold it once I got my Niner fixed. Different strokes I guess.

brewer90 05-29-2012 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chisenhallw (Post 18786909)
Many wise people have said that it's important to learn to pick a line and negotiate obstacles with a 26er first. Then go to 29.

And other wise people have said just the opposite. Both bikes have their pros/cons - just get the one you like and enjoy the sport:clap

Gummee! 05-29-2012 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brewer90 (Post 18792395)
And other wise people have said just the opposite. Both bikes have their pros/cons - just get the one you like and enjoy the sport:clap

its a lot easier on your bike and wallet to learn how to pick a line and ride smoothly.

M

Stinez 05-29-2012 02:29 PM

I'm faster and climb better on my 29er than my 26er. :nod

It may have something to do with the ~6lb weight difference. :evil

That said, riding the heavier bike for the last several years has conditioned me to the point of riding up with the fast kids now that I'm on a equally capable and lighter 29er.

Some of them used to try to drop me on climbs but they've learned that I'm there to stay.

OTOH -Having gone down kinda hard on a steepish section on the 29er I've been checking my speed on HD's until I regain my confidence. (It's a slow process because my aim is the long term.)

rbrsddn 05-29-2012 02:56 PM

OTOH -Having gone down kinda hard on a steepish section on the 29er I've been checking my speed on HD's until I regain my confidence. (It's a slow process because my aim is the long term.)[/QUOTE]


And broken collarbones and separated shoulders are no fun atall! Ask me how I know!

brewer90 05-29-2012 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 18792440)
its a lot easier on your bike and wallet to learn how to pick a line and ride smoothly.

M

And why is this not possible on a 29er?

Blur 05-29-2012 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rbrsddn (Post 18792819)
And broken collarbones and separated shoulders are no fun atall! Ask me how I know!

I cracked two ribs each of the first two years after getting back into mountain biking. I was afraid it was going to become a tradition :lol3
Thankfully, haven't cracked any ribs since 2008.


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