ADVrider

ADVrider (http://www.advrider.com/forums/index.php)
-   Sports (http://www.advrider.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=72)
-   -   Bicycle thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150964)

kannonbal 07-19-2012 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Head (Post 19165055)
I began riding with a team back in the 80's after working the Coors Classic stage race in Colorado. The group wuld begin form the shop in lower downtown and head either north up Riverdale road or east past the airport, (the old one the new one was still wheat). About the time we made the overpass out by the north end of Stapleton, the group would be gone. They would just go.
It took a friend and I a good three or four months of riding with them and on our own learning to ride better, harder, spinning and climbing to be able to hang with them after that gun went off.
After a year we could take our turn in the pace line and not puke. Eventually we got to where we could even chase and catch the juniors. :clap
Then after a lot of mountain miles I was able to drop the group on the feed hill at the Morgul-Bismark course and never saw them for three laps or so, when I finally got bored and sat on the rail at the top of the Wall and waited for them. That was my reward for those first few months of the group dissappearing off into the distance.

Riding with a good team can be great. You can learn a ton that just can't be learned off the bike. And there is nothing, nothing like spinning along nearly effortlessly at 28 to 30 mph in a big group talking and letting the juniors tow you all up the road. The sound all those sew-ups and high pressure tires make at that speed is one of the coolest things I've ever experienced. Smack talking around the big lunch table at the sponsoring feed bag was cool too.
If the group you rode with doesn't turn out to click with you, there are lots more. Check the local shops for teams and training rides.

That is exactly what my sponsor (?) said. Basically he reminded me that these boys have been practicing for years, are all accomplished cat 1 riders, and are looking to hurt each other on this ride each week and that I need to be realistic with my expectations and to not get discouraged. Just because I can hold a good pace while riding by myself, it is a entirely different game rolling with the big boys. I guess I should just be flattered they even invited me to try riding with them.

Thanks, guys, for all the insights!

Chisenhallw 07-19-2012 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kannonbal (Post 19164772)
.
As an aside, why are so many road bikes such snotty pricks. Maybe 3 guys out of 15 even bothered to introduce themselves to me. So, on the bright side, it's not like I missed out on a chance to hang out with some cool new people.
.

This is kind of why I hang out with tri folks. Maybe it's the complete lack of dignity, but they're a lot more welcoming than most of the hardcore cyclists I've encountered. The crit nerds were the *worst*.

frazman 07-19-2012 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19104869)
I noticed last week that my 26er's front wheel comes up too easily on hill climbs, no matter how I positioned myself. On very steep hills, it proved to be impossible to keep the front end down, even with my chest as far over the handlebars as possible. A more experienced riders tells me that instead of using the large gear in front and the largest gear in back, I should have used the small gear in front and the third or even fourth largest gear in back. He claimed this would even out the torque spikes going to the back wheel and prevent the front end from coming up with every pedal stroke. I haven't had the chance to try his advice due to rain, but I can't see why this would make a difference. Won't the amount of torque be approximately the same in both cases?

:scratch

You've got to move your CoG forward and down. You've got your chest to the bars, but move your ass towards the front of the saddle, to the point that the nose of the saddle is almost in your, well you get the idea. Also, keep your elbows tucked in towards your hips - basically parallel to your body as opposed to the "bat wing" style. At the same time twist your grips downwards (like twisting a throttle for more gas) as you take a pedal stroke. All these things combined will make climbing more ergonomically efficient. Practice this technique on small hills and work up to steeper climbs.

Regarding gearing, depends on the grade of the hill, the traction of the surface and your pedalling force.

Joe 07-19-2012 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut (Post 19164896)



I have a ton of elbow and wrist issues. I've had each operated on once and have been told I'm going to need another round of surgeries on each (8 in total, twice per wrist and twice per elbow). I started using an aerobar, to get the weight off my wrists and elbows. Using them allows your skeleton to support your weight and not subject your joints to the task. Your bike is on the smaller size, for your height, so you shouldn't have any problem with the front-to-rear dimension. However, you'll probably have to go to a 125 degree stem, to get your bars up high enough to be comfortable. My road ride is here. Since the pic, I've added a 125 degree stem and changed the drivetrain to SRAM. This is the aerobar I use. It has the most adjustability and stack height that I've found.

Thanks for the advice I truly appreciate it. I looked at the aero bars but wasn't sure if it would work, it makes sense and worth a try.

Thanks again :thumb

TheYeti 07-19-2012 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kannonbal (Post 19164772)
went out with some of the fast boys of the local club yesterday. Fucking humbling. Made it over the first few undulations with them, hit the flats and 6" turned into 5' turned into broken elastic all in about 30 seconds. Spun like hell to try to close, failed, and that was all she wrote.

Disappointing because I really expected more from myself.

Have a whole slew of excuses but, at the end of the day, it was just that I am not anywhere near their level of fitness even though my fitness is worlds above where it used to be.

As an aside, why are so many road bikes such snotty pricks. Maybe 3 guys out of 15 even bothered to introduce themselves to me. So, on the bright side, it's not like I missed out on a chance to hang out with some cool new people.

I sure like the charity rides (with spandexed women) a whole lot more.

I know riding with this group will make me stronger but really not sure if I even want to go next week

sigh....

Ridge hits the nail on the head,Cyclists are a close knit group. Riding and Training is what will make you stronger,if you are getting dropped from a group fairly quickly you need a slower group. One that will make you work hard to stay with,not one that'll blow you off the back. Group ride is just that (riding with other people) if you're gonna be riding by your self why go on a group ride.That being said ,If you Use these "fast guys" to gauge your fitness don't be too hard on your self, Now you know what to expect. Each time you ride with them, ask your self what were my weakness on the ride ,More hill work, speed work, strengh work, endurance training. or all the above. A good training program will give your training structure. Good luck stay in touch.

k7 07-19-2012 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ridge (Post 19164940)
Sometimes you just need a rabbit to chase. This can give a good picture of speed fitness if that's what you're shooting for. I train solo 99% of the time, but occasionally join a group ride. Some are crazy fast and very close to race simulation whereas most others are usually somewhere in-between. It really boils down to what you want to get out of the ride.

As for the snotty pricks part... roadies are just a tight clique of riders. We all usually ride within the same group due to safety in numbers and the confidence of repeatedly riding at speed among the same group. Any time a new rider wishes to join a fast group, it's met with cautious apprehension. This is only because a lot can go wrong in a very short period of time if that new rider is unfamiliar with group riding dynamics at speed. Single-line pacelining, rotating double pacelines, sprint drills and other activities during the ride are best left to those that do it regularly and aren't redlining their fitness level in the middle of a ride. Cycling at speed for long periods is all about efficiency of power conservation. If the group can rotate a pace line efficiently at speed, they will be within inches of each others tires without worrying about mishandling, wobbling or sketchiness from someone trying to stay in but is hitting their limit. Any time you add loose handling to speed, it creates a dangerous situation for everyone.

All that said... patience, dedication to your goal(s) and humility are the best tools in your arsenal. There's always someone faster out there and one day it will be you.

Good post. I don't do fast group rides any more but if it were me, I'd keep trying to hang with them but hang off the back and work your way into the group slowly over the course of several weeks as your fitness increases.

Once they see that you have good skills, can maintain discipline with your speeds and aren't a nervous rider, you won't have any issues.

Just remember though, the average IQ of any group of riders, bicycle or motorcycle, goes down as the number of riders increase. :deal They just don't want anyone to push them too far to the left of the bell curve.

Brek81 07-19-2012 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ridge (Post 19139510)
Riding with my local club/team. We're going as team trunk monkey this year. :lol3 We'll be in a white 15 passenger van towing a red trailer with Cycles de Oro plastered all over it. We should be arriving early Saturday morning. Will try and ping you then. Mine is 919.328.0265 James


Team White Bus here we had 'liscence plates' last year, not sure about this year

Probbably wont be there till saturday around dinner

Brian: 515.707.7462

ducnut 07-19-2012 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kannonbal (Post 19165221)
Thanks for taking the time to compile all this info. Though, after the ass kicking I received yesterday, maybe just some clamp on aero bars, a helmet, and a skin suit may be the smartest route for me right now.

Ass-kickings happen, no matter what equipment you have. :lol3

RxZ 07-19-2012 06:14 PM

Did my first full loop of the local trail this afternoon :clap

After two rides, and one crash (not including a massive crash in Angle Fire a few weeks ago on a rental bike)... I can tell this may turn into a pricey hobby :deal

I'm running low on hobbies though, so I can handle it :evil

Brek81 07-19-2012 07:51 PM

Just put mini-v's on the cross bike..... So that's what stopping feels like......this may take all the fun out of riding with groups :P

Ridge 07-19-2012 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brek81 (Post 19168241)
Team White Bus here we had 'liscence plates' last year, not sure about this year

Probbably wont be there till saturday around dinner

Brian: 515.707.7462

cool, we loaded the trailer tonight and pick up the van in the morning. hope I get to catch you guys.

sent from my intergalactic space modulator

Aurelius 07-20-2012 04:15 AM

Old school
 
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto...32688413_n.jpg

Gummee! 07-20-2012 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19165016)
How do you communicate to other riders on a narrow trail that you want to pass them? I always pull off to the side when I see another rider crowding my rear wheel, but many people don't. In several instances, I've actually observed another rider deliberately speed up to prevent me from getting by him. When I asked this question of the Fast Boyz who ride my favorite local trail, the advice I got was to stick out my elbow and knock the other guy off his bike. :huh They weren't kidding, either. Surely there must be a better way. :ear

Best piece of advice: If they're not gonna move over nicely wait till a wide section of trail and just go round.

I'm not the fastest thing off-road, so I don't have a problem getting out of the way of those who are *but that's just me.*

AFA roadies are pricks: yeah, until yer one of the 'in group' then while we're still pricks, it won't be aimed at you. :D The way to get into the 'in group' is to prove you're strong enough and skilled enough to be there. :nod In the group I'm riding in, I'm just starting to get there. It helps that I'm acquaintances with some of the truly fast guys, and have proven that despite being the weakest guy there, I know what I'm doing. To get some real respect, you have to be able to actually beat the guys yer riding with.

I get real nervous when someone shows up for the fast ride and isn't obviously fit. I get really really nervous when a triathlete or mtn biker shows up cause neither generally know the 'rules of the road' as it relates to riding in a pack. Bad things happen quickly when someone rides stupidly.

Having said all that, I'll still say 'howdy.'

M

Gummee! 07-20-2012 06:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RxZ (Post 19169722)
Did my first full loop of the local trail this afternoon :clap

After two rides, and one crash (not including a massive crash in Angle Fire a few weeks ago on a rental bike)... I can tell this may turn into a pricey hobby :deal

I'm running low on hobbies though, so I can handle it :evil

The cycling rabbit hole gets REALLY deep. :nod

Speaking of which, my little part of the rabbit hole just got a pair of Zipp 440 wheels for $140. :deal First gen carbon tubies for 'race wheels' for cross. :clap They're not quite what I really want, but the price was right.

I'm gonna race em for the fall then see if a buddy wants em. They're built for a clydesdale (28/28 spokes) and he's one.

M

RxZ 07-20-2012 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 19172667)
They're built for a clydesdale (28/28 spokes) and he's one.

M

Still learning the biking lingo... Is this someone who is over 200 lbs (like me :cry)???


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:57 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2015