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-   -   Bicycle thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150964)

Aurelius 08-08-2012 08:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LoJack (Post 19310058)
I hope she pulls through. I feel fortunate with the minor injuries I've received from being hit by cars. Interesting that article didn't lay blame either side. That's kind of nice, though I must say, electric cars move fast and they are very quiet. I have been thinking of going around and super gluing kazoo's to the hoods so they make some sort of noise. Maybe it's just a hot topic, but I keep hearing about how hybrids are involved in a large portion of pedestrian and bicycle accidents.

The law here requires that bicyclists keep well to the right on public roads so as not to block motorized traffic. Bicyclists never do that of course; they prefer to be all over the road where they can be run over. Guess I'll have to put a bigger bumper on my Prius.

LoJack 08-08-2012 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19311783)
The law here requires that bicyclists keep well to the right on public roads so as not to block motorized traffic. Bicyclists never do that of course; they prefer to be all over the road where they can be run over. Guess I'll have to put a bigger bumper on my Prius.

That's not entirely true.

pierce 08-08-2012 08:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19311783)
The law here requires that bicyclists keep well to the right on public roads so as not to block motorized traffic. Bicyclists never do that of course; they prefer to be all over the road where they can be run over. Guess I'll have to put a bigger bumper on my Prius.

law here is, 'far to the right as PRACTICAL AND SAFE'. if the shoulder is too narrow for the bicycle, its expected the cyclists will be out in the lane

anyways, from the story on this accident, apparently they were on crossing roads (one was going east or west, and the other north or south), so lane psition hardly enters into it.

Gummee! 08-08-2012 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19311783)
The law here requires that bicyclists keep well to the right on public roads so as not to block motorized traffic. Bicyclists never do that of course; they prefer to be all over the road where they can be run over. Guess I'll have to put a bigger bumper on my Prius.

From FL's laws:
Roadway Position (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
  • A bicyclist who is not traveling at the same speed of other traffic must ride in a designated bike lane (see Bike Lane Law Explained) or as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway. A bicyclist may leave the right-most portion of the road in the following situations: when passing, making a left turn, to avoid road hazards, or when a lane is too narrow for a bicycle and a car to share safely. (see Roadway Position Explained)
  • A bicyclist operating on a one-way street with two or more traffic lanes may ride as close to the left-hand edge of the roadway as practicable.
  • Persons riding bicycles upon a roadway shall not ride more than two abreast except on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles. Persons riding two abreast shall not impede traffic when traveling at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions existing, and shall ride within a single lane. (see Impeding Traffic Explained)
To save you a click:
Roadway Position Explained

State Law says you must ride as far to the right as practicable. It does NOT say as far to the right as possible. Practicable means capable of being done within the means and circumstances present.
A cyclist should maintain no less than 2 feet of clearance from the edge of usable pavement to have room to maneuver around obstructions and to be more visible to crossing traffic. (NOTE: useable pavement does not include the gutter pan or any area frequently obstructed by debris or other hazards.)
In an extra-wide lane a cyclist should ride farther left—about 4 feet from the flow of traffic—to operate in the focus area of crossing traffic and reduce vulnerability to common collisions
When a lane is too narrow for a bicycle and a car to share safely, the cyclist is entitled to the use of the entire lane. Within this lane, the cyclist usually rides on the right half to facilitate visibility for overtaking motorists, but should ride far enough left to discourage motorists from trying to squeeze past within the lane.
Although the law uses the term "substandard" to discribe a lane that is not wide enough to share, these narrow lane-widths make up most of our roads. The less common "standard," wide curb lane is described below.
Other “practicable” considerations:
On-steet parking — A cyclist riding past parallel-parked cars should maintain a clearance of 4 feet to avoid risk of collision with an opening car door.
Intersection positioning — A cyclist going straight through an intersection in a lane that serves thru traffic and right turns, should ride in the center or left half of the lane to avoid common collisions. Cyclists should never ride straight in a lane marked exclusively for right turns, i.e., one marked or signed with the word "ONLY."
One-way streets — A bicyclist operating on a one-way street with two or more traffic lanes may operate in the left lane.
Paved shoulders — Where a curb is not present, the right-hand edge of a roadway is the line between the roadway and the shoulder. Since the
definition of "roadway" excludes the shoulder [316.003], cyclists are not required to ride on paved shoulders, although they may prefer to do so. A cyclist may ride only along a right-side paved shoulder, i.e., must ride in the direction of traffic, since this is the only practical way to comply with the requirement to obey all applicable traffic signals and signs [316.074]. A cyclist operating in the shoulder is vulnerable to common crossing collisions where many streets and driveways are present.


For your reading enjoyment. Note that the emphases are theirs not mine

M

Oznerol 08-08-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19311783)
The law here requires that bicyclists keep well to the right on public roads so as not to block motorized traffic. Bicyclists never do that of course; they prefer to be all over the road where they can be run over. Guess I'll have to put a bigger bumper on my Prius.

This doesn't seem like an appropriate time or place to grind that axe.

brewer90 08-08-2012 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19311783)
The law here requires that bicyclists keep well to the right on public roads so as not to block motorized traffic. Bicyclists never do that of course; they prefer to be all over the road where they can be run over. Guess I'll have to put a bigger bumper on my Prius.

http://images.sodahead.com/polls/002...s1_xlarge.jpeg

Gummee! 08-09-2012 05:10 AM

The shop owner came out on the Wed ride last nite. Guy's a Cat 1. Put the hammer down. I could hold onto his wheel till it got up to close to 90% of his effort level. :clap

Kept getting the 'I'm fine. I'm fine. I'm fine. BANG! Legs exploded gimme a few minutes to recover...'

I need to figure out a way to get some motorpacing in next spring.

Cross season starts in less than a month. Almost time to stick the 46t ring back on the cross bikes and check the glue jobs on the tubulars.

:ricky

M

PMC 08-09-2012 06:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brewer90 (Post 19316577)

^^^THIS^^^ is 100% correct

As someone who has been run down while on a bicycle (and not breaking the law in any state as it is written) the bumper comment isn't funny.

Gummee! 08-09-2012 08:03 AM

Cross remounts suck. Mostly because I can't get rid of that damn hop.

:bluduh

M

frazman 08-09-2012 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmc (Post 19319093)
^^^this^^^ is 100% correct

as someone who has been run down while on a bicycle (and not breaking the law in any state as it is written) the bumper comment isn't funny.

+1

Offblnz 08-09-2012 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee! (Post 19319712)
Cross remounts suck. Mostly because I can't get rid of that damn hop.

:bluduh

M

Look up how to do it in "Why Your Bicycle Mechanic Drinks":lol3

Aurelius 08-09-2012 08:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PMC (Post 19319093)
^^^THIS^^^ is 100% correct

As someone who has been run down while on a bicycle (and not breaking the law in any state as it is written) the bumper comment isn't funny.

Some of you are working much to hard to miss the point. The state of Florida, I'm told, boasts one of the largest number of bicyclists per capita in the country. Yet bicyclists are universally despised in this state. When a bicyclist is run over there's no expression of sympathy as there is for other types of traffic accidents. The presumption always is that the bicyclist was at fault. Why? Because of the reputation bicyclists have created for themselves. It's not just that they routinely ignore traffic laws that makes them both a hazard and a nuisance to other road users, it's also their behavior even when they're not breaking the law. It's revealing to see riders who think claiming that they're not doing anything illegal is a defense for how they ride. Common courtesy is not something road users are required by law to practice, but we do it regardless, and we rightly criticize those who don't. But for some reason the rules of civil behavior go out the window where roadies are concerned. Florida is not New England; we don't have narrow roads barely wide enough for a single vehicle to contend with, yet cyclists see nothing wrong with riding in the middle of the lane when there is ample room to allow traffic to get by them. When riding in a group, they feel even more entitled, often riding two or even three abreast so that no one can get by. This happened again last weekend. Despite the fact that our motorcycles are barely wider than a bicycle, the group of roadies we encountered refused to move over to allow us to pass. We were left with the option of either putting along behind them at 15 mph in a 50, or swerving into the oncoming lane to find a way through -- a task made difficult by the fact that there was a stream of bicycles ahead of them who were also perfectly content to act as a rolling road block. :huh When I rode a bicycle on the street years ago, it would never enter my mind to behave in such a despicable manner. It's one reason I only ride my road bike on paved paths nowadays: because I don't want any association with those fucktards who give cyclists a bad name. As for those here who think hybrids are to blame for your accidents, if you stray into the path of a Prius, it's not the fact that it's a hybrid that caused the accident; it's that you were too absent minded, arrogant, or just plain stupid not to look where you were going.

YakSpout 08-09-2012 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19319868)
Some of you are working much to hard to miss the point. The state of Florida, I'm told, boasts one of the largest number of bicyclists per capita in the country. Yet bicyclists are universally despised in this state. When a bicyclist is run over there's no expression of sympathy as there is for other types of traffic accidents. The presumption always is that the bicyclist was at fault. Why? Because of the reputation bicyclists have created for themselves. It's not just that they routinely ignore traffic laws that makes them both a hazard and a nuisance to other road users, it's also their behavior even when they're not breaking the law. It's revealing to see riders who think claiming that they're not doing anything illegal is a defense for how they ride. Common courtesy is not something road users are required by law to practice, but we do it regardless, and we rightly criticize those who don't. But for some reason the rules of civil behavior go out the window where roadies are concerned. Florida is not New England; we don't have narrow roads barely wide enough for a single vehicle to contend with, yet cyclists see nothing wrong with riding in the middle of the lane when there is ample room to allow traffic to get by them. When riding in a group, they feel even more entitled, often riding two or even three abreast so that no one can get by. This happened again last weekend. Despite the fact that our motorcycles are barely wider than a bicycle, the group of roadies we encountered refused to move over to allow us to pass. We were left with the option of either putting along behind them at 15 mph in a 50, or swerving into the oncoming lane to find a way through -- a task made difficult by the fact that there was a stream of bicycles ahead of them who were also perfectly content to act as a rolling road block. :huh When I rode a bicycle on the street years ago, it would never enter my mind to behave in such a despicable manner. It's one reason I only ride my road bike on paved paths nowadays: because I don't want any association with those fucktards who give cyclists a bad name. As for those here who think hybrids are to blame for your accidents, if you stray into the path of a Prius, it's not the fact that it's a hybrid that caused the accident; it's that you were too absent minded, arrogant, or just plain stupid not to look where you were going.

There are three other threads for this discussion and NONE of them are in Sports.

Gummee! 08-09-2012 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Balanzed (Post 19319779)
Look up how to do it in "Why Your Bicycle Mechanic Drinks":lol3

Oh I *know* how to do it. The brain does anyway. I've done it before. Then I caught my leg on the back of the saddle and the body sez 'eff you buddy! I ain't doin THAT again!' and I get that little hop.

:bluduh

M

PMC 08-09-2012 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurelius (Post 19319868)
Some of you are working much to hard to miss the point. The state of Florida, I'm told, boasts one of the largest number of bicyclists per capita in the country. Yet bicyclists are universally despised in this state. When a bicyclist is run over there's no expression of sympathy as there is for other types of traffic accidents. The presumption always is that the bicyclist was at fault. Why? Because of the reputation bicyclists have created for themselves. It's not just that they routinely ignore traffic laws that makes them both a hazard and a nuisance to other road users, it's also their behavior even when they're not breaking the law. It's revealing to see riders who think claiming that they're not doing anything illegal is a defense for how they ride. Common courtesy is not something road users are required by law to practice, but we do it regardless, and we rightly criticize those who don't. But for some reason the rules of civil behavior go out the window where roadies are concerned. Florida is not New England; we don't have narrow roads barely wide enough for a single vehicle to contend with, yet cyclists see nothing wrong with riding in the middle of the lane when there is ample room to allow traffic to get by them. When riding in a group, they feel even more entitled, often riding two or even three abreast so that no one can get by. This happened again last weekend. Despite the fact that our motorcycles are barely wider than a bicycle, the group of roadies we encountered refused to move over to allow us to pass. We were left with the option of either putting along behind them at 15 mph in a 50, or swerving into the oncoming lane to find a way through -- a task made difficult by the fact that there was a stream of bicycles ahead of them who were also perfectly content to act as a rolling road block. :huh When I rode a bicycle on the street years ago, it would never enter my mind to behave in such a despicable manner. It's one reason I only ride my road bike on paved paths nowadays: because I don't want any association with those fucktards who give cyclists a bad name. As for those here who think hybrids are to blame for your accidents, if you stray into the path of a Prius, it's not the fact that it's a hybrid that caused the accident; it's that you were too absent minded, arrogant, or just plain stupid not to look where you were going.

not worth reading... go ride your bike path and keep your Prius in FL

As mentioned already there are plenty of anti bicycles on the road threads where like minded folks like you can rant all you want. Just because you own bicycles doesn't make you a cyclist, don't forget that.


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