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achiral 03-18-2007 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by knary
:clap

She found it. It's a beauty for a mass market bike. It almost looks like it's got lugs. A 2006 Lemond Versailles. I don't know that I've seen a nicer looking mass made bike under $5k.

We're picking it up tomorrow. It fits her very well. The components are solid. The frame is head and shoulders better than anything else she's seriously looked at. She *loves* the way it handled a bumpy down hill on a test ride. They fiddled with bar tape and got the hoods to be the way she needs. She's bouncing off the walls happy. As others have said, you should, if you can, buy a bike that presses your buttons. This one sings to her.

$1200 vs. $1700 MSRP. I've found it for a hint less at other places, but not at a local shop.


When we were leaving, we got to watch a couple head out on their Calfee Tandem! Jeebus, that's a lot of carbon.

Nice bike - good to see she found one that pressed the right buttons :1drink

(8cm stem common on a bike that size? Tells you how many women I see riding... :cry)

knary 03-18-2007 09:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by achiral
Nice bike - good to see she found one that pressed the right buttons :1drink

(8cm stem common on a bike that size? Tells you how many women I see riding... :cry)

Yep. 75 to 85, sometimes a 90, but usually an 80.

knary 03-18-2007 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RobZim
I'm sufficiently jealous :evil

You're not the only one. :pout

Gummee! 03-18-2007 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by knary
Yep. 75 to 85, sometimes a 90, but usually an 80.

That'll make for some 'interesting' handling...

100-120 is more 'normal' for stems.

Bought a 135mm Salsa for my first Manitou fork. Made that bike handle way funky for the opposite reason. Too long and too far up. :scratch Oh well. What did I know? :ricky

Nice bike. Tell her I/we said congrats!

M

achiral 03-18-2007 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
That'll make for some 'interesting' handling...

100-120 is more 'normal' for stems.

Bought a 135mm Salsa for my first Manitou fork. Made that bike handle way funky for the opposite reason. Too long and too far up. :scratch Oh well. What did I know? :ricky

Nice bike. Tell her I/we said congrats!

M

Yeah - my initial thought on that short of a stem would be odd handling.

On that small of a frame, you've got to tweek quite a bit in terms of geometry, including an increased rake for tire clearance. Since you can only increase the rake so much, you are still left with a relatively long top-tube compared to frame size. As such, you need to compensate with a shorter stem (and add in that women have longer legs and shorter torsos than men, and you've got real issues).

Actually, with that increased rake, steering will slow down somewhat. The shorter stem tends to amplify steering input, so the two may cancel out somewhat.

A larger bike with less rake would be incredibly twitchy with that short of a stem, though.

knary 03-18-2007 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by achiral
Yeah - my initial thought on that short of a stem would be odd handling.

On that small of a frame, you've got to tweek quite a bit in terms of geometry, including an increased rake for tire clearance. Since you can only increase the rake so much, you are still left with a relatively long top-tube compared to frame size. As such, you need to compensate with a shorter stem (and add in that women have longer legs and shorter torsos than men, and you've got real issues).

Actually, with that increased rake, steering will slow down somewhat. The shorter stem tends to amplify steering input, so the two may cancel out somewhat.

A larger bike with less rake would be incredibly twitchy with that short of a stem, though.

Makes sense. On the model she's getting, a 49w bike has a 71.25 head tube angle vs 73.5 on a 57. The stock stem length is 90 for hers (though 80 or 85 on the one she's getting) and 120 on a 57. These days, the major brands are putting 700's on even the little bikes, not 650's. There are few options for the latter and I bet they can't as easily get to a specific price point.

All I really know is that she handled the bike very easily for someone that hasn't been riding much the past decade. Through the Team in Training stuff, I've watched some beginners and other less experienced riders struggle to handle a bike, especially at low speeds. Over and over, they topple or awkwardly bang pedals off shins. I expected my wife to struggle as well. While she's not moving around with all the grace of a Tour champion, she, without thinking or having it suggested, got up on the pedals and moved her ass of the seat while negotiating a bumpy section of road, and balanced the bike at a near crawl while waiting for a car. With one demonstration, she adapted to the STI shifters. Nothing big you think, but lots of people out there lack these basic skills, even after a bunch of miles and some coaching.

Can you tell that I'm excited about sharing this thing I've come to love with my wife? :clap

gambrinus 03-19-2007 07:38 AM

650C Wheels?

RW

pierce 03-19-2007 07:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gambrinus
650C Wheels?

RW

indeed, scaling the wheel size down to match the diminutive frame would be ideal, but where would you find decent roadie tires? 26" is the next standard size I know of, and thats almost exclusively mountain bike-n-cruiser land, I've never seen anything skinner than a 1" 'slick'.

Gummee! 03-19-2007 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
indeed, scaling the wheel size down to match the diminutive frame would be ideal, but where would you find decent roadie tires? 26" is the next standard size I know of, and thats almost exclusively mountain bike-n-cruiser land, I've never seen anything skinner than a 1" 'slick'.

:nono Triathletes LOVE 650c tires and wheels!

More aero, but you need bigger (like 54-55t) chainrings to compensate.

M

pierce 03-19-2007 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
:nono Triathletes LOVE 650c tires and wheels!

More aero, but you need bigger (like 54-55t) chainrings to compensate.

M

ah, hokay. I'm way out of modern road bike tech, I guess. I probably have done more miles on silk sewups than I have on 700C clinchers, and I think my old roadbike seatbag still has a patch kit that has a needle and thread in it :loco

around the mid 80s, my road bike got mostly retired, and I started doing more miles on mountainbikes. and around about the late 90s, I got lazy :augie

Gummee! 03-19-2007 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
around about the late 90s, I got lazy :augie

No Shit fatboy!

Lose some of that gut before you break yer bike and hafta ride bitch again!

:lol2

M

knary 03-19-2007 11:09 AM

Roof rack?
 
Shite... something just occurred to me. Since my wife's new bike is so tiny, the old trunk bike rack probably won't work. Getting those arms through both her bike and mine at the same time probably won't work.

It might be time to spend more money. :lol3 :bluduh

Any thoughts on roof racks? The old honda civic lacks rain gutters and the like. I assume Thule or Yakima. Any guess as to how much $$$ we'd be looking at?

pierce 03-19-2007 11:50 AM

yakima.

actually, yakima has a 'bar' that goes from the stem to the seatpost which is intended to help you rear-rack odd shaped mountain bikes, but might well work. its very soft pads shouldn't scratch the bike at all.

but I don't like putting $3000 worth of bikes on the back bumper for some soccermom to crush because her doggie distracted her.

yakima roof racks rule. Its been awhile, but I think bars + towers + adapters run about $150, and bike racks run $100 to $150 each. I have two of the type you leave both wheels on, suitable for fat tire bikes, and one where you take the front wheel off and clamp the forks. the yakima system also includes kayak mounts, ski racks, snowboard racks, surfboard, you name it. nice cargo boxes too.

for a aero-door modern car, the rack towers have a soft rubber pad that sits on the roof near the door seam, then a custom-to-your-car 'clamp' that snakes into the door seam and clamps to the frame. works really well, I used that on my 89 jetta. just use a soft cloth to wipe off any dust from the roof where the pads are going and wipe the pads off if they got dirty before mounting the bars. I'm anal, I like to take the rack off when I'm not using it as I find the empty rack can knock a coupla MPG off on freeway trips.


ok, at yakima.com, ouch, qtowers (for aero roofs) are $138 MSRP now, the clips/clamps for your specific model car are $30, the bars are $57, so I guess its more like $230 for the basic racks, and the minimalist 'boa' wheel-off bikerack is $69 each, the upright 'raptor' wheel-on style I have are $99, and they got fancier ones for more. Oh, add about 4-6 lock cores so your roof rack doesn't become someone elses, bikes included. $25 each, buy them together and share a set of keys.

oh, the $56 fairing a nice accessory, it hugely quiets the wind whistle at speed (and you can mount it with the 'yakima' label on the inside for -3 dork points.)

ok, as a package, MSRP on towers, clips, fairing, bars, 6 lock cores, and 2 Boa bike mounts came to $452. locally here, this stuff can be found discounted about 10-15% at Outdoor World, maybe 25% when they have an annual sale. they say you can put 125 lbs load on the roof of a 1995 Honda Accord Sedan (that was the sample car I used)... start here -> http://www.yakima.com/Consumer/Step1.aspx

knary 03-19-2007 11:57 AM

:thumb
Thank you, pierce. Great info. At that price, I suddenly have the urge to upgrade the car to something big enough to stow the bikes inside. :lol3

There's something about replacing a car that's not broken that has lots of life in it that makes my skin crawl.

time to talk to the wife...

knary 03-19-2007 11:59 AM

p.s. And I've seen what rear racks, even the nice ones, can do to the finish of a bike. No thank you. Hers is a bike I'd like to keep as pristine as possible. Gawd, that steel and carbon look so good.


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