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Bunt 11-16-2008 08:04 PM

[QUOTE=Doubletrackmind]I'll also post a couple of images of a bike I had the chance to ride.


Yep, it's a belt drive. The ride and pedal response was amazing.

Mark Lynsky was at Gran Fondo in Nashville yesterday. If you're not familiar, he is the Litespeed Lynsky who now is doing his own frames. He had one of these belt drive commuter bikes there. Very COOL. The belt maker is hoping to break into the low end beach bike market where chains are so quickly rusted.

Also very cool top and down tubes on his new Ti bikes.

Bunt

Gummee! 11-16-2008 09:03 PM

Got a ride in today. Sorta anyway...

Went bicycle hashing. :nod Yeah, like the r*nning thing, only on bikes. Did not quite 20km in about an hour of riding time. Slow. Most of that was spent looking for trail. As in: where'd the trail go?! And you gotta go look up this side street, etc. I had either a killer headache or hangover today. When moving, I was fine. Stopped? Not so much. :nah

I still don't feel well, but that's OK, I'm about to head back to bed. :nod

Put some Mondo S-Works 25c tires on Stick Me's bike. She seems to like em better'n the 23c Axial Pros that were on there before. If yer not racin, or are heavier's about 200#, it seems to be a good 'upgrade.'

M

Tenacious B 11-16-2008 09:11 PM

After a couple of years off I rebuilt my Montague MX, tricked it out with some fenders and street tires, and started commuting again. I wish I had the time to ride everywhere. :D

skibum69 11-17-2008 02:21 AM

I was just getting started on a decent ride and got a call to go recert my first aid a couple of hours early. Unfortunately I ran out of riding partner options after that.

Still warm up here, 12C this am, so that should translate to more riding. It's a bit of a bummer being dark by 4:30 though.

moterbiker 11-17-2008 05:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MsLizVt

Gypsy et al, Hi!

Most likely you all have gone through a lot of different thought processes and have answers for them, but allow me to share and/or repeat my thoughts and experiences please.

Bike fit is important as you know. Seat height can be a moving target in millimeters. In some cases the perfect height might be too much. Lowering the seat to accommodate bad knees or ankles can have an effect. I will say though, it's another trial and error process.

Pedals and shoes though are the typical culprit. You're mentioning cleats which brings to mind toe clips versus clipless pedals. I'm guessing that he is having the knee problems with new to him clipless pedals, yes?

Years ago I was doing Brevets. Those are unassisted rides for distances of 200Km, 300Km, 400Km, 600Km, and 1200Km such as the Boston-Montreal-Boston and Paris-Brest-Paris rides. We would ride straight through the nights, stopping to sleep and eat wherever we could. Look it up, fascinating stuff.

My point is doing those long rides I first started out using Look pedals with no rotation. As the foot moved through the pedal cycle the shoe would not rotate on the pedal at all. I always had a bit of pain doing longer rides but it wasn't until riding seven hours straight for 130 miles that I realized how much pain there was.

At that point I converted two of my bikes and shoes to Speedplay pedals because they allowed the foot to rotate on the pedal. I can honestly say that after that I never had the same knee pain. All my bicycles are now fitted with Speedplays.

The kinesiology of the pedaling foot and leg is such that the foot is in one position at the top of the stroke and rotates during the down stroke with the foot being in another position at the bottom of the stroke, only to change again on the upstroke. Effectively the ligaments and tendons attaching the lower leg to the knee and thigh are being stressed continually for the entire ride.

Assuming these details:

Distance 30 miles
Cadence 90 rpm
Speed 15 mph

Riding time = 2 hours

Cadence times 2 hours times 60 minutes per hour = number of complete strokes

90*120=10,800 completed strokes on each leg. Then multiply it by two to get the stress of the down stroke plus the upstroke. So 21,600 times the ligaments are stressed when the knee is rotating in various directions and the foot is staying in one position.

Stand behind and/or in front of someone on a bicycle and watch the angle of the knee during the complete rotation. It will be rotating in and out in line with the femur. Now look at the angle fo the foot between the heel and the toes. In a perfect situation the foot with loosely rotate with the change in angle of the knee and femur. If it's not rotating than consider where that stress is going.

Speedplay is not the only pedal system that allows rotation, check out the other manufacturers too. I also will state that not everyone uses pedals that allow rotation. Some people haven't had knee troubles with fixed pedals, that's great luck for them. There are also a gazillion user opinions about what pedal system is best or worse.

Regarding the toe clip pedals, I must say that I loved my old Record pedals with toe clips. I never had knee problems back then, younger and more supple perhaps, but I believe it's because there was a bit of sloop between the shoe cleats and pedals.

Riding style can be a factor here as well. If the rider has been a 'masher' who pushs big gears at a low cadence and is very strong, converting to a more fixed pedal system can be putting huge stresses on the tendons and ligaments.

Are you all familiar with pronation and suppination? We talk about this a lot in ski boot fit. When someone is standing flat footed and they bend forward at the knees you can see which way the knees turn and what the foot does on the floor. This is about the natural direction of rotation of the ankle joint. If they bend forward and the knees turn in and the foot goes flat at the arch of the foot then they are pronated. If the knee turns out and the arch opens up with the pressure going on the outside of the foot then they are suppinated. In skiing the knees are typically bent which determines the pressure on the bottom of the foot which is important when pushing down to edge the ski in a turn. I could go on and on about the dynamics of of skiing but allow me to say that it plays over to bicycling.

The angle of the foot to lower leg through the ankle can be influenced by pronation and suppination, thus affecting the lower leg to femur through the knee. In ski boots we adjust for this with form fitted foot beds. They are also used in bicycling shoes.

Ok, so this is probably far too much information. I will say that I don't know it all and others most likely will have different opinions, views, and experiences. My words only come from my own thirty adult years of riding, racing, and coaching. That doesn't mean I'm the authority, just that I have some knowledge.

Has any of this been helpful to you all? Just say the word and I'll post links with more details to study.

Enjoy,



Liz




Thanks for the info, I think going back to clips will benefit me, I won't have a cleat on my shoe to hold my foot in one place so it might allow more movement. The clipless pedals I have were supposed to allow enough movement but probably not. All I can do at this point is try the clips and see what happens. I will be bummed out if this means I can't ride anymore.

I can be a "masher" as you put it, I try not to though.

Cheers

Triple 11-18-2008 05:20 AM

Gummee is EVIL! He hooked me up with a Chris King headset and as I was putting it on I ended up rebuilding my bike. Some how my credit card came out at the bike shop for new pivot bearings. Then the next thing I know a new set of wheels comes in. After that they call me up to let me know my seat post arrived. The seat post even came with a little lever to make it go up and down. What was I to do? http://scm.smugmug.com/photos/419320096_Vf4pa-L.jpg
Like I said be careful of Gummee he is EVIL!!!!

Gummee! 11-18-2008 06:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Triple
Gummee is EVIL! He hooked me up with a Chris King headset and as I was putting it on I ended up rebuilding my bike. Some how my credit card came out at the bike shop for new pivot bearings. Then the next thing I know a new set of wheels comes in. After that they call me up to let me know my seat post arrived. The seat post even came with a little lever to make it go up and down. What was I to do? http://scm.smugmug.com/photos/419320096_Vf4pa-L.jpg
Like I said be careful of Gummee he is EVIL!!!!

Boy! is that HS purty! :tb It was a CH away from going on MY bike...

Oh, and that's what you get makin me ride with my hoopty make-do lights and not yer nifty Mi-Newt. :mrskbasa

:D

I got my bike stuff back! In the bins are some original forged Specialized mtn cranks with the Suntour MD bolt pattern, a Thomson SP, a Dean Ti SP, many derailleurs, and other fun stuff (like a stack o' tubular rims 12" deep :clap :rayof) so I can build the Mavic 571/2 Campy Omega XL clincher wheelset that I've been waiting for for the last 3 years. :clap

Oh, anyone need a pair of 28h Aerohead Escape tubular rims? You'll prolly need to be less than 160#. I inherited em with a wheelset I bought. Lightly used. Make me an offer. Prolly be a GREAT cross wheelset for the lighter rider. Some CX-Rays and brass nips on the DS and you'll have a light, durable wheelset...

M

gambrinus 11-18-2008 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Triple
Gummee is EVIL! He hooked me up with a Chris King headset and as I was putting it on I ended up rebuilding my bike. Some how my credit card came out at the bike shop for new pivot bearings. Then the next thing I know a new set of wheels comes in. After that they call me up to let me know my seat post arrived. The seat post even came with a little lever to make it go up and down. What was I to do? http://scm.smugmug.com/photos/419320096_Vf4pa-L.jpg
Like I said be careful of Gummee he is EVIL!!!!

Those Crank Bros. wheels are SWEET!!!!

RW

mikeyb 11-18-2008 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Triple
Gummee is EVIL! He hooked me up with a Chris King headset and as I was putting it on I ended up rebuilding my bike. Some how my credit card came out at the bike shop for new pivot bearings. Then the next thing I know a new set of wheels comes in. After that they call me up to let me know my seat post arrived. The seat post even came with a little lever to make it go up and down. What was I to do? http://scm.smugmug.com/photos/419320096_Vf4pa-L.jpg
Like I said be careful of Gummee he is EVIL!!!!

Those are some funky lookin wheels.
Nice bike too(same model as mine).

I just got a Trailtech HID so I can get in some riding after work.
That light is awesome, it makes night riding more fun than day rides.

bergermeister 11-18-2008 09:25 AM

I'm thinking of picking up an old rigid mountain bike for general riding with the family and grocery runs. I figure put suspension on the front and it becomes somewhat dirt capable. I've been looking at old stumpjumpers and bridgestones from the 80's/90's on craigslist.

can anyone comment on these who had one back in the day about what to avoid? do you think these will eventually be collectible, as I've seen mentioned on the interwebs?

Gummee! 11-18-2008 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bergermeister
I'm thinking of picking up an old rigid mountain bike for general riding with the family and grocery runs. I figure put suspension on the front and it becomes somewhat dirt capable. I've been looking at old stumpjumpers and bridgestones from the 80's/90's on craigslist.

can anyone comment on these who had one back in the day about what to avoid? do you think these will eventually be collectible, as I've seen mentioned on the interwebs?

The only issue I can see right off is old-skool rigid bikes weren't designed for suspension forks. My 87 Rockhopper certainly wasn't. :nah

Stick with the upper end from 'big names' like Ritchey, Breeze, Fisher, Specialized, Rocky Mtn, Yeti, et al and you won't go too wrong.

I can tell you from personal experience that I can go just as many places off-road on a rigid bike as a FS or Front suspension bike. Its all about lines, skill, and cojones. :nod In fact, I've ridden trails on a cyclocross bike that doods on FS bikes were on. Yeah, they looked at me like I was nuts. Prolly was/am, but as long as I went/go slow enough to not hit hard enough to screw things up, I was/am fine. :nod

So... if yer buyin an older, rigid bike, may as well keep it for what it is, and get something newer, lighter, and designed for the suspension for off-roading.

My $.02 anyway

M

notmike 11-20-2008 04:10 AM

Do any of you bicycle types have any cool old rear derailleurs laying around you want to get rid of? I've started a little collection and am always on the look out for interesting stuff. I'll post some pics soon but I've got everything from a Campy Nuovo Record to a pink plastic Ofmega abomination from the 80's.

pierce 11-20-2008 08:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bergermeister
I'm thinking of picking up an old rigid mountain bike for general riding with the family and grocery runs. I figure put suspension on the front and it becomes somewhat dirt capable. I've been looking at old stumpjumpers and bridgestones from the 80's/90's on craigslist.

can anyone comment on these who had one back in the day about what to avoid? do you think these will eventually be collectible, as I've seen mentioned on the interwebs?

the original rigid stumpjumpers were -tanks-. indestructible.

downsides, not easy to find replacement parts for the old school part sizes on them... the first gen stumpjumpers were 3x5 speeds and if your rear sprocket needs service, you can't get parts for it, or even a replacement 5 speed, you have to get a 7 speed, which means you have to redish the rear wheel which.... and the front headsets on new bikes are all way different, the old school headsets won't take newer handlebars etc.

http://www.hogranch.com/digi-2007/20...s/IMG_9135.JPG
1983 Stumpjumper Sport

LongWays 11-20-2008 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce


Saa-weet fenders dude! :razor

I had one of those Tom Ritchey badged Montares - pretty sure it was the first mountain bike in Toronto and it was absolutely the first at the University of Waterloo that year. Good times, good times...

bergermeister 11-20-2008 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce

that's a beautiful bike, love the biplane forks and fenders.

thanks gummee and pierce for the great info. I'm not looking to do anything too crazy on it, I just get a hankerin to ride down my front steps once in a while, a request my soma smoothie es will not accommodate. even if I wanted to do some serious dirt work, most of our trails have burned down lately...

I had many good years in the late 80's/early 90's on cannondales, which I was unable to break (or brake). I don't hear them mentioned too often...


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