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-   -   Bicycle thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=150964)

skibum69 11-28-2008 06:01 PM

I'm trying to get one of theose Derbi 2.0's for riding DH around here! Not available in Canada though. Dammit!

potatoho 11-28-2008 06:23 PM

I have one of these ordered: http://www.stealthelectricbikes.com....th_bomber.html

We're just discussing wheels right now.

It's a custom built MTB frame with trick SR Suntour v-boxx 9 speed gearbox. It also has a 4HP hub motor wheel. Should be good for some long range riding.

reed523 11-28-2008 07:34 PM

Bicycle hauler
 
Surely someone in this thread needs a bicycle hauling rig. Slip over to Flea market and buy mine. Works great for hauling road bikes too!!
http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/c...acation023.jpg

pierce 11-28-2008 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dyingtolive

how about...
http://www.motorcycle.com/gallery/ga...e_DSC_0312.jpg

:deal
(designed by a former Santa Cruz Mountain Bike guy... 23HP, 50 lb-ft, 140 lbs with battery pack, these go like stink on a MX track).


anyways, its STILL not a bicycle. looks like a fon of tun, however!

Dranrab Luap 11-29-2008 05:10 AM

I just signed up for the Tour Du Rouge. It is a 6 day 512 mile ride from Houston to New Orleans. It should be a good time, but I am a little apprehensive. I have never ridden over 45 miles in a day. I also have really bad knees, a bad shoulder and degenerative disc disease in by back. On top of that, I have to raise $2500 for the American Red Cross (see sigline.)

Two days ago I rode 40 miles in slow rolling hills. I did it without stopping or eating anything along the way. I felt OK when I was done, but it is obvious that I have to ramp up my training/saddle time.

k12steve 11-29-2008 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I just signed up for the Tour Du Rouge. It is a 6 day 512 mile ride from Houston to New Orleans. It should be a good time, but I am a little apprehensive. I have never ridden over 45 miles in a day. I also have really bad knees, a bad shoulder and degenerative disc disease in by back. On top of that, I have to raise $2500 for the American Red Cross (see sigline.)

Two days ago I rode 40 miles in slow rolling hills. I did it without stopping or eating anything along the way. I felt OK when I was done, but it is obvious that I have to ramp up my training/saddle time.

First I want to wish you a safe and successful tour!!! You should have fun.

Now, just to beat you up for a moment . . . :wink:

Your "accomplishment" of riding 40 miles without eating is a recipe for FAILURE!!! Seriously, good on you for doing the 40 but eating along the way is necessary, especially for a multi-day event.

Keep working on mileage but don't neglect eating and drinking. There are many choices for on the road energy. Rather than recommending one, stop by a major bike shop and see what they have . . . there are many choices.

Again, good luck!

Gummee! 11-29-2008 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k12steve
First I want to wish you a safe and successful tour!!! You should have fun.

Now, just to beat you up for a moment . . . :wink:

Your "accomplishment" of riding 40 miles without eating is a recipe for FAILURE!!! Seriously, good on you for doing the 40 but eating along the way is necessary, especially for a multi-day event.

Keep working on mileage but don't neglect eating and drinking. There are many choices for on the road energy. Rather than recommending one, stop by a major bike shop and see what they have . . . there are many choices.

Again, good luck!

For sustained day to day riding, you can replentish all yer glycogen stores and then some by eating the right thing RIGHT AFTER (as in less than 30min) after you get off the bike. Up to 90min, you don't need food or those fancy electrolyte drinks. Once you ride past that mark consistently, then yeah, eating every 45-60 min (depending on whatcher eatin) is a good thing.

Beer is prolly NOT the best thing, so for the big ride, I'd stay away as much as possible. :nod

Now, head on over to bicycling magazine's website and hunt around, I'll betcha they have a training plan that'll get you where you need to be without overtraining. :nod Never a good idea to go more'n 10% more every week. :nah That includes intensity as well as distance. :nod

HTH

M

Dranrab Luap 11-29-2008 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k12steve
First I want to wish you a safe and successful tour!!! You should have fun.

Now, just to beat you up for a moment . . . :wink:

Your "accomplishment" of riding 40 miles without eating is a recipe for FAILURE!!! Seriously, good on you for doing the 40 but eating along the way is necessary, especially for a multi-day event.

Keep working on mileage but don't neglect eating and drinking. There are many choices for on the road energy. Rather than recommending one, stop by a major bike shop and see what they have . . . there are many choices.

Again, good luck!

Your point is well taken. I didn't mention it as an accomplishment, but rather as a point of reference (which meant absolutely nothing absent further qualification.) In the past when I had gone for rides of 40 miles or more, I bonked seriously if I didn't eat along the way. I had resolved to never do that again. I had planned on stopping at the only convenience store on my route for a quick bite, but it was closed. I had set out to do 50, but I wouldn't dare do that without more food.

The ride started out warm, but the temp dropped about 15 degrees along the way. I was wearing shorts. I found that the cold seemed to make my legs feel more fatigued than they would normally feel on a ride of that length.

Gummee! 11-29-2008 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
The ride started out warm, but the temp dropped about 15 degrees along the way. I was wearing shorts. I found that the cold seemed to make my legs feel more fatigued than they would normally feel on a ride of that length.

I always keep a plastic bag that the Sunday funnies come in folded up in my repair kit. Folds up VERY small, but still covers enough of my torso to make me warm enough in 'emergency' situations. Smaller and easier to stash than a vest. :nod

Old adage: keep the torso warm and you keep the rest of you warmer. :nod

HTH

M

Bimble 11-29-2008 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
... I have never ridden over 45 miles in a day. I also have really bad knees, ...

Along with the other great advice:

Work on IT band stretches. Seriously. I did my first long haul this summer loaded with camping gear and aggravated my IT band something fierce all because I neglected proper stretching. It ended my trip.

Good luck on your ride. I just looked up the dates. From now until May should be plenty of time to prepare.

slide 11-29-2008 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dranrab Luap
I just signed up for the Tour Du Rouge. It is a 6 day 512 mile ride from Houston to New Orleans. It should be a good time, but I am a little apprehensive. I have never ridden over 45 miles in a day. I also have really bad knees, a bad shoulder and degenerative disc disease in by back. On top of that, I have to raise $2500 for the American Red Cross (see sigline.)

Two days ago I rode 40 miles in slow rolling hills. I did it without stopping or eating anything along the way. I felt OK when I was done, but it is obvious that I have to ramp up my training/saddle time.

Had a friend take a tour of Italy which worked out to about 80 miles a day over two weeks. He wasn't in particularly good shape but had no difficulties. The trick is that he had all day to do the 80 miles so figure about 10 mph which is nothing even on hills. I mean it was a 12 hour day or so. So there were all these breaks & food.

I think you'll do ok unless you develop a problem with blisters or other chafing issues.

Flaco 12-03-2008 11:08 AM

I need a recommendation for a good shop in St Louis.

I think my friend is in E St Louis which I'm pretty sure is where Clark Griswold couldn't find the freeway. Not sure if there's a good shop in that area but any info will be appreciated.

Thanks!

RichBeBe 12-03-2008 11:25 AM

I am trying to make a comfortable commuter bike that is not likely to get stolen. Starting with a Trek 7.2fx which is not upright enough or aggressive enough to be comfortable. My plan is to go with the ipright approach. Anyone have any experience with albatross, dove, north road stuff, etc. I do not want to invest in new levers, shifters etc. The current stuff is mountain bike levers and trigger shifters.
Any input would be appreciated.

Oznerol 12-03-2008 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RichBeBe
I am trying to make a comfortable commuter bike that is not likely to get stolen. Starting with a Trek 7.2fx which is not upright enough or aggressive enough to be comfortable. My plan is to go with the ipright approach. Anyone have any experience with albatross, dove, north road stuff, etc. I do not want to invest in new levers, shifters etc. The current stuff is mountain bike levers and trigger shifters.
Any input would be appreciated.

Have you considered just changing the stem?

I've got a Trek 7300 set up to serve the same role you're talking about -- a commuter that isn't an appealing theft target. I've converted mine to a singlespeed, put on a stainless chain, and it's my only bike with platform pedals. It looks like a crappy beater, which it mostly is. I leave it unlocked on the back porch where it's easy to grab and ride, and I've left it unlocked on the rack in front of my office a couple of times on days that I forgot my lock.

I've come to strongly prefer the more upright position for this sort of riding. It's not very efficient, but since the distances are short and the speed is low, that doesn't matter much. The heads-up position makes it easy to see over cars and to look over my shoulder when changing lanes.

But I'm not sure I'd want to go to extreme-sweep bars like the North Road to achieve that position; I find that a flat or moderately-swept handlebar makes the bike easier to maneuver at low speeds than one that puts your palms almost facing one another. If I were in your position, I'd look into getting a new stem or a higher riser bar to bring your hands up and back.

skibum69 12-03-2008 03:35 PM

ditto that approach-a higher rise stem and a riser handlebar can get you upright without sacrificing performance such as you want it.


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