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RichBeBe 12-10-2009 03:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zippy
I froze my ass off last week pedaling in and the weather channel said it was 61 .?:rofl

Anybody have suggestions for a good ( flat proof ) commuting tire ?

I have tried Michelin Pilot City - $$$ sidewalls are showing cracks like a retread < 1000 miles. No tread wear no flats. Extremely hard to mount this tire. 700 x 32

Michelin City - was using for a front with the pilot on the rear. Good tire but was on the front so unsure of flat protection . Showing very little wear . 700 x 28


Panaracer Ribmo - just had them put on a new wheelset I had built . Only have about 50 miles on them . Got a rear flat this morning had a thin 6 inch nail pop through. I like the fact they can run up to 100 psi , only complaint is no reflective sidewall like the michelins . The tire was easy off and on when changing my flat at lunch.

I read good things about schwalbe marathons but have yet to try 'em.

Good friend commutes 29 miles a day five days a week and in every weather condition. She uses Schwable Marathons and is on the same pair after 8,200 miles and has had only one flat.
It made me buy a pair and so far so good.

Javarilla 12-10-2009 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RichBeBe
Good friend commutes 29 miles a day five days a week and in every weather condition. She uses Schwable Marathons and is on the same pair after 8,200 miles and has had only one flat.
It made me buy a pair and so far so good.

Schwalbe Marathons on three bikes. Commute 58 miles twice a week, and about half that on weekends. One bike's been wearing them for about 8 months.

So far, so good, knock on wood.

Schwalbe Stelvios and Kojaks on the other hand...

zippy 12-11-2009 04:09 AM

good stuff Lewy !



Thanks to all for tire suggestions . Looks as though I will be rolling scwalbe marathons in the near future. Hey santa 700 x 28 or 700 x 32 please.
Although I will leave the ribmos on awhile to see how they stand up.

Andrew 12-11-2009 08:52 PM

Some cool redwood fenders my old man just made:

http://barneyj.smugmug.com/Woodworki...58_qD2VF-M.jpg http://barneyj.smugmug.com/Woodworki...48_w39ST-M.jpg

http://barneyj.smugmug.com/Woodworki...04619325_RRmVG

Javarilla 12-11-2009 10:16 PM

How well do those things work?

And what do you think of that Hillborne? Is it a Hillborne?

TheNedster 12-11-2009 10:17 PM

Rivendell, yes? Kudos to your Pops, very fine work!

PaleRider 12-12-2009 07:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheNedster
Rivendell, yes? Kudos to your Pops, very fine work!

+1 :thumb

(Those are very cool Andrew, even cooler that your Pa made 'em. First class :thumb )

Andrew 12-12-2009 09:14 AM

He made them for one his neighbors (yes, it's an "Uncle Sam" Hillborne), who poured on the patina of love with five layers of Formbys Tung Oil, followed by five layers of Butchers bowling-alley paste wax. For my dad, it was a fun project to use his band saw to make the very thin (1/16") redwood strips, and then an MDF form to set the shape and laminate them against (three strips per fender).

I wish that was my bike. My old Rivendell LongLow looks a bit long and low in the tooth in comparison, but I'm going to ask, ever so politely, if he'll make up a set for my bike, which would look gorgeous.

How they hold up in this rain, well should be waterproof but as you can see, they're flat, and so are going to be best at catching the water flung off the tread, less effective at containing the side spray. But oh, how cool they look! :thumb

http://barneyj.smugmug.com/Woodworki...92_Mcm4n-M.jpg

There he is, with the bike's owner Dan.

http://barneyj.smugmug.com/Woodworki...72_DMLp9-M.jpg

DoctorIt 12-12-2009 12:36 PM

Not only chilly today, but windy, really windy. The first few miles along the river sucked big time, so I decided to give the smaller dirt roads up in the hills a try. Turned out to be a great idea. Slow, but I was able to ride 99% of it, even some singletrack which turned out to be easier with the few inches of packed snow than it was just last week with 6" of loose leaves!

http://www.erikm.net/Other/SmugShots...49_Qn4k9-M.jpg

RogueClimber 12-12-2009 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew

There he is, with the bike's owner Dan.

http://barneyj.smugmug.com/Woodworki...72_DMLp9-M.jpg


The fenders are beautiful! But holy crap look at the length of the top tube :eek1

Andrew 12-12-2009 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RogueClimber
The fenders are beautiful! But holy crap look at the length of the top tube :eek1

You think that's tall... my Rivendell "LongLow" built somewhere around 1998:

http://diesel.smugmug.com/Shiny-Thin...19_TJXbS-M.jpg

Spoke to my dad this morning, and he's going to fit my new fenders into his busy workshop schedule :thumb

RogueClimber 12-12-2009 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew
You think that's tall... my Rivendell "LongLow" built somewhere around 1998:


Spoke to my dad this morning, and he's going to fit my new fenders into his busy workshop schedule :thumb

Nice pun there...

And I think too many folks these days want to look like the pros so they buy a bike with a far too aggressive riding position.

slackmeyer 12-12-2009 03:03 PM

Those are beautiful. Probably a higher maintenance finish than I would have chosen, but I bet they just glow.

pierce 12-13-2009 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RogueClimber
Nice pun there...

And I think too many folks these days want to look like the pros so they buy a bike with a far too aggressive riding position.

these days? heck, back in the 70s, everyone was buying cinellis and other criterium race frames. short, twitchy, painful to ride. after riding one of those sorta bikes (a bianci team) for 6 months, I opted for the motobecane I bought in 1975 specifically because it was a long relaxed wheelbase, and had a very nice ride, a good balance of springy without being whippy. forks had a longer rake/trail then was typical on the race frames, too.

another reason I liked the motobecane was that it came in 24", most frames were 23" or 25" and I was a tweener. 24" is 61cm (from the center of the bottom bracket axle to the centerline of the top tube at the seat post)... now, I'm not sure 1970s frame sizes directly correlate to todays frames, the geometry of newer bikes seems quite different, with sloped top tubes and such.

TheNedster 12-13-2009 09:52 PM

I've been pining for a Norco Ceres for some time now. Coincedentally, the outdoor sports outfitter not 200 yards down the road from my office started carrying....Norco bikes!:deal Also Bianchi, Niner, Ellsworth, Van Dessel and Moots, FWIW. Anyways, I was just wondering what the opinions were on Norco so far as quality, etc. Even if the Ceres doesn't pan out (they didn't have one yet), I was impressed by what I saw and would consider one of their other bikes.


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