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sweetlou 01-03-2010 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JeffPrice
Don't know anything specific about LOOK pedals - but I've been riding shimano and Richey clipless for years.

Jeff, this is "LOOK"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LOOK

It is the type of pedal you clip a big hunk of plastic under your foot into a ski-type binding on the pedal. Very popular. The other type of pedal is the SPD type, or recessed, which are usually found on mountain bikes. Check out http://www.caree.org/bike101clipless...m#PedalSystems

I've been reading that if you pedals are junk, your bike is junk. So I may upgrade my junk.

Can anyone recommend a good pair of road bike pedals? I dont need to compete with Lance or Ms. Liz but 50-100 mile days are not out of the question.

Thanks!

Lou

Gummee! 01-03-2010 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sweetlou
Jeff, this is "LOOK"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LOOK

It is the type of pedal you clip a big hunk of plastic under your foot into a ski-type binding on the pedal. Very popular.

I've been reading that if you pedals are junk, your bike is junk. So I may upgrade my junk.

Can anyone recommend a good pair of road bike pedals? I dont need to compete with Lance or Ms. Liz but 50-100 mile days are not out of the question.

Thanks!

Lou

I've been riding Dura Ace pedals since they licensed the Look design 'way back when.' (took me 1/2mi to fall over the first time I rode em too! :bluduh) I'd say stick with the Shimano SPD-Sl series of pedals.

I usually ride D/A, but I don't buy em new, so I'm payin Ultegra prices for D/A quality. OR I'm workin for a shop and get em wholesale. :deal

M

ducnut 01-04-2010 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sweetlou
Can anyone recommend a good pair of road bike pedals?

I really like Speedplay. My GF and I rode SPD pedals, previously. I switched to Speedplays when I bought my tri-bike. She switched with her new tri-bike, too. We're very happy with them. My LBS owner recently switched from Looks to Speedplay and says he'll never go back. He switched his MTB and cross bikes, too. They work so smooth and seamless. No more worries of pedal orientation. Just stomp on 'em and go. There's no resistance in the float. They unclip with no effort. Just rotate the heel. No clunky, mechanical feeling. Simple maintenance. They're worth a try.

BTW, we run the lowest, Cro-Mo models.

k7 01-04-2010 08:45 AM

interesting....
 
I stopped riding pretty much in the late 80's and it's been a learning experience as I transistion back into cycling. Four obvious areas are the areas of disk brakes, suspensions, clipless pedals and even threadless forks.

The Fargo doesn't have any suspension and I've purchased Shimano SPD pedels and clips. I mounted the clips to the shoes last night and it's a pretty cool mechanism in the pedals.

When the bike arrives tomorrow, I'll attempt to measure the fork and then I'll get the steering tube cut and the star nut installed. None of those appear to difficult from a technical viewpoint but I'll likely get a local shop to do these for me. I'd purchase the tools myself but they're almost kind of a one-use tool since I have no need for a tube cutter or the Park tool that sets the star nut.

Any other advice is always appreciated as I proceed with assembly.

zippy 01-04-2010 08:48 AM

don't be in a hurry to cut your steerer tube. You can run a spacer or two above the handlebars until you get dialed in.

ducnut 01-04-2010 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zippy
don't be in a hurry to cut your steerer tube. You can run a spacer or two above the handlebars until you get dialed in.

^^^ +1

Also, gives you more options later.

gambrinus 01-04-2010 09:29 AM

+1000 on NOT cutting the steerer tube.

Set your desired height with spacers.. if you have tube sticking up above the stem, just stack some spacers up there and roll with it. DO NOT cut until you have a few hundred miles on the bike. As you get used to things and you become more flexible, you'll be adjusting again.

RW

Cat0020 01-04-2010 10:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fz6kd7
i didn't read all 10k+ replies but have recumbents been mentioned??
i've got an action bent and like it alot, it won't go off road but fun for the streets. anyone else have a lounge chair on wheels?

I've posted a few pictures of my recumbent in the past..
Wife and I are planning to ride our recumbents on the Great Allegheny Passage from Pittsbourgh, PA to Wash. DC later this year.

Recumbent riding for the masses isn't about speed or winning races, but more for comfort and getting places without the regular aches and pains in the butt, lower back or neck.
For long distance touring or self supported touring, recumbents are ideal. I have no doubt a capable recumbent rider would/could dominate a race like RAAM or most long distance events over a road bike rider with similar physical condition and training.

As a commuter, recumbents could be effective, but difficult to transport if you have to use public transport along the way, also difficult to store once you reach your destination.

sweetlou 01-04-2010 10:16 AM

You guys familar with Crank Brothers? I keep hearing GREAT things about them. I can't figure out if their cleat is compatible with my current shoe:

Sette Electron http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/177...Blue/White.htm


These are the crank brothers I am considering:

Crank Brothers Egg Beater SL Pedals http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/123...-SL-Pedals.htm

or

Crank Brothers Egg Beater C Pedals http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/149...r-C-Pedals.htm

Any insight?


Thanks


Lou

k7 01-04-2010 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zippy
don't be in a hurry to cut your steerer tube. You can run a spacer or two above the handlebars until you get dialed in.

Quote:

Originally Posted by gambrinus
+1000 on NOT cutting the steerer tube.

Set your desired height with spacers.. if you have tube sticking up above the stem, just stack some spacers up there and roll with it. DO NOT cut until you have a few hundred miles on the bike. As you get used to things and you become more flexible, you'll be adjusting again.

RW

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
^^^ +1

Also, gives you more options later.


You bet - my plan exactly. I was hoping that the spaces included are enough for it "as is". Otherwise, I may have to have a little taken off the top.

Thanks for the advice though!

ducnut 01-04-2010 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cat0020
I have no doubt a capable recumbent rider would/could dominate a race like RAAM or most long distance events over a road bike rider with similar physical condition and training.

Dominate? That would never happen. They're way too heavy, cumbersome, and inefficient. The recumbent would be left behind from the get-go. Not to start an argument, but, here are the facts. The recumbent record is nearly three full days behind, at a hundred less miles. Also, realize that the speeds listed are the averages, including the rider's rest periods. The top cyclists average approximately 19MPH on the bike.


<TABLE><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top colSpan=6>Solo Men</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=45>Record


</TD><TD vAlign=top width=40>Year


</TD><TD vAlign=top width=40>Speed


</TD><TD vAlign=top width=50>Time


</TD><TD vAlign=top width=40>Miles


</TD><TD vAlign=top width=325>Who


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Speed


</TD><TD vAlign=top>1986


</TD><TD vAlign=top>15.40


</TD><TD vAlign=top>8:09:47


</TD><TD vAlign=top>3107


</TD><TD vAlign=top>Pete Penseyres


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Time


</TD><TD vAlign=top>1992


</TD><TD vAlign=top>14.91


</TD><TD vAlign=top>8:03:11


</TD><TD vAlign=top>2911


</TD><TD vAlign=top>Rob Kish


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Rookie Time


</TD><TD vAlign=top>1996


</TD><TD vAlign=top>14.07


</TD><TD vAlign=top>8:14:26


</TD><TD vAlign=top>2905


</TD><TD vAlign=top>Wolfgang Fasching


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Rookie Speed


</TD><TD vAlign=top>1985


</TD><TD vAlign=top>14.31


</TD><TD vAlign=top>9:02:06


</TD><TD vAlign=top>3120


</TD><TD vAlign=top>Jonathan Boyer


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>50-59


</TD><TD vAlign=top>2006


</TD><TD vAlign=top>12.63


</TD><TD vAlign=top>10:00:52


</TD><TD vAlign=top>3043


</TD><TD vAlign=top>Jonathan Boyer


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>60+


</TD><TD vAlign=top>2008


</TD><TD vAlign=top>11.27


</TD><TD vAlign=top>11:03:25


</TD><TD vAlign=top>3014


</TD><TD vAlign=top>David Jones


</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>Recumbent


</TD><TD vAlign=top>2008


</TD><TD vAlign=top>11.30


</TD><TD vAlign=top>11:02:50


</TD><TD vAlign=top>3014


</TD><TD vAlign=top>John Schlitter


</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

fz6kd7 01-04-2010 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cat0020
I've posted a few pictures of my recumbent in the past..
Wife and I are planning to ride our recumbents on the Great Allegheny Passage from Pittsbourgh, PA to Wash. DC later this year.

Recumbent riding for the masses isn't about speed or winning races, but more for comfort and getting places without the regular aches and pains in the butt, lower back or neck.
For long distance touring or self supported touring, recumbents are ideal. I have no doubt a capable recumbent rider would/could dominate a race like RAAM or most long distance events over a road bike rider with similar physical condition and training.

As a commuter, recumbents could be effective, but difficult to transport if you have to use public transport along the way, also difficult to store once you reach your destination.


is this passage an old canal? enjoy the trip.
yeah for the street i love my bent, took a ride in death valley and that was nice to have all the scenery out in front of you without straining my neck to look around as on a conventional bike, later this year will be zion and a bike path in St. George ut.

Cat0020 01-04-2010 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
Dominate? That would never happen. They're way too heavy, cumbersome, and inefficient. The recumbent would be left behind from the get-go. Not to start an argument, but, here are the facts.

I think you meant "not yet" instead of "would never happen".

Not to start an argument?
the RAAM record speeds that you've listed are not set on the same race course over the same distance.. I think you should compare among the overall finishers in the same year..
2008 was the first year that solo recumbent has ever participated and finished a RAAM, there was no solo recumbent participant last year.

ducnut 01-04-2010 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cat0020
I think you meant "not yet" instead of "would never happen".

Not to start an argument?
the RAAM record speeds that you've listed are not set on the same race course over the same distance.. I think you should compare among the overall finishers in the same year..
2008 was the first year that solo recumbent has ever participated and finished a RAAM, there was no solo recumbent participant last year.

In 2008, 50-59 age group (same as the recumbent rider), the top finisher on a road bike finished right behind the recumbent. :eek1

I'll eat my words. You could be right.

skibum69 01-04-2010 12:12 PM

I knew a guy who used to ride an offroad one in XC events-he liked it. I tried it out but his legs were way longer than my little stumps:lol3


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