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2whlrcr 09-16-2006 05:16 PM

No cycling for me today. Resting for the enduro tomorrow.:D

Zodiac 09-17-2006 08:34 AM

Feeling achey in lower back again. Beautiful day though, gonna be on the GS for the nxt week on roadtrip, so I gotta get my last ride in today.

I'm gonna pull the shorts on. I can hear my back knees and ankles creaking/snapping...

:huh


Oh well,

no pain....no pain...:cry

knary 09-17-2006 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Photog
Eeeeuuuww. Sounds like north carolina cold. :vardy Keep those kneecaps warm.

Coldest I've ever been was in NC rain.

Onya for riding. I'm gonna tune up the Marin's front derailleur and go for a spin later. Nice weather here.

What a great ride.
'Brief' story...

This was last training ride before the century next weekend (9/24) and it was mine to lead. As such, we were "tapering" and only going to do 40 miles or so. The planned route was to include a pretty serious climb but because a few members of the team are a bit "allergic to hills" (to borrow a phrase), we planned out an easier 27 miles starting from the same point.

With those allergic members opting to not show up for the ride, John, the coach, suggested that not only should we do the ride up the Larch Mountain, but that we should take the slightly harder approach. After a bit of under the breath grumbling, we headed out.

It was chilly. It was overcast. It was humid and foggy. Soon, past the meander of the Sandy River, we were climbing.

The first real hill (a 16% grade - or so John said) had a few riders balking, debating over turning back. Eventually they split off while the remainder continued on. On up into the primeval forest and fog we went. Three of us took the lead.

John is a spry 53 years old with a gentle folded face and somberly relaxed demeanor and the modest size of an endurance athlete. A month ago he completed his first Iron Man triathlon. A story in itself (see next post). He rides a tireless bike with big gears. On a small flat, he decided to tempt Jay, the third of the trio, up the hill. Jay hung back with me. As I began to huff and puff, Jay chatted easily. At 6'2" and less than 130 lbs, he is the model climber, a whippet, a bent spoon dangling lean strong thighs. As he puts it, "I'm not built for anything else." Pushing more than 180 lbs, I'm the biggest guy on the day's ride. Oof.

I drank last night. I drank something with sangiovese and something with syrah and cabernet. The night before, I ran a few miles, the first in several years. Idiot. Reluctant thirsty muscles squeaked and tweaked. The climb dragged on. I thought there were rollers somewhere. Please. Let there be a top and a bottom to even just a quarter mile piece of road. Whose idea was this. Oof. There was no momentum, no rolling, no rest. My calves started to clench. I bid a farewell to Jay and pulled over to stretch.

Back on the climb, things settled in. Jay always a flourescent blob ahead at each bend in the road. But now we're in the clouds. Visibility drops. The temperature drops. Drops of water and perspiration run down my glasses and spine. The forest a haunting layering of suggestive shadows, massive pine and fern. The road a dark shiny carpet down a forbidden hallway. I look back and see something move behind me and disappear into the gloom. The boogie man is a better motivator than any friend. I pedal harder.

At mile 24 or so, we're at the top. We wait with Cindy and Glen who'd come up to meet us. She's healing from her run-in with a boat trailer. As the group slowly reforms, we shiver. The temp hovers a bit over freezing. Moisture condenses on every surface. We'd ridden for the ride but also for the views from the top of this ancient and dead volcano. A line of lean bikes lean against a curb, gray swirls, shock of bright jackets seeming to shimmer as their occupants shiver.

A climb means a descent, and I love to hurl down any hill, wet roads or not. I'm the last to leave the top. Jay struggles to make any speed, a feather caught in the wind. We're cold, too cold, so f-ing cold. The wind cuts. Our fingers ache, clamped on the drops as our speeds climb. Soon I'm up in front arcing through each turn. And then the back end starts to slide in a turn. I'm sideways, but not over yet. A flat tire. The bead has pulled from the rim.

John waits with me while I change the tire. My fingers fumble. John struggles to find the next word. The poor man needs some fat on him.

A mile later, again the back end is squirming. Another flat. This time the tube failed at the stem.

Knowing that we've fallen far behind, John and I throw down the proverbial hammer. We push harder than I've ever pushed. With the wet and sometimes rough pavement and high speeds, I can't stay behind him. I need to see. We both push. A car could have drafted in our wake. With the effort, we warm. As the altitude drops, we warm. We never stop pedaling. Push. Push. Push.

After a quick rendezvous with two riders, Jay and Nicole, that waited for us, we resume our pace. Jay tries to hang on but finally drops back. We're silent, but both smiling. It's rare on these training rides that anyone gets to open the throttle.

"I want to check out an alternate route? That ok?" John yells through the wind. We turn UP the road. Our legs aren't ready for this. They plead with us to stop. The road turns UP. Climb we beg. No they whine. Climb, monkey, CLIMB! Cresting the top, we laugh. "I didn't know if there was going to be a hill or not!" We're both done. We're cooked. Over cooked. Legs of rubber and frayed twine.

I pull us in. Gone is 35 mph. Gone is 30 or 25. 19 feels like a bit much. We're cooked. Ahhh...18, that's good.

A fantastic ride. As we huddle over chocolate milk, tator tots and pastrami sandwiches, quiet John prattles on about the ride. How hard we rode. How I surprised him. How much climbing we did. I've never heard him so enthusiastic.

A fantastic ride. 48.66 miles and more than 4,000 feet of climbing (total isn't quite known). Lots of people have ridden farther, higher, faster. But this was an accomplishment for me - one I hope to soon repeat and better.

p.s. This ride is roughly the first half of the torture 10,000.

p.p.s. "Brief"? :lol3

Zodiac 09-17-2006 02:17 PM

Just did a 20 miler. You guys would be surprised how hilly Central park is.

It's not like long giant hills (Harlem hill is the longest of them), but it's got quite a bunch of ups and downs for a 6.2 mile circuit.

Kept a 18 mph pace, rode with a fixey most of the way, he kept me paced and not off racing.

Life on Basso is good:D

pierce 09-17-2006 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perry
Just did a 20 miler. You guys would be surprised how hilly Central park is.

lookgin at it with google earth, it looks like the lowest point in Central Park is 40' above MSL, and the highest spot is 120'. phew. you've gotta funny concept of 'hilly'. the road I live on climbs 300' in 1/2 mile. the local park I like to mountainbike in has about 1200' of elevation change in a couple miles (and its all 'UP' with no breathers). THATS hilly. Knary was talking about 4000' of climbing on that little training loop they did (thats ouch!).

knary 09-17-2006 02:32 PM

So how soon until we have one of us traveling to ride their bicycle with another advrider? :lol3

Zodiac 09-17-2006 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
lookgin at it with google earth, it looks like the lowest point in Central Park is 40' above MSL, and the highest spot is 120'. phew. you've gotta funny concept of 'hilly'. the road I live on climbs 300' in 1/2 mile. the local park I like to mountainbike in has about 1200' of elevation change in a couple miles (and its all 'UP' with no breathers). THATS hilly. Knary was talking about 4000' of climbing on that little training loop they did (thats ouch!).

Oh don't get me wrong, I know it ain't shit (I did the hills of North Shore Long island last wknd 24m each day, but it's a constant up and down, and although short hills like I said, there's never really any flatspots. It's like a small rollercoaster.

I was wondering who would do the research...:lol3

It's the "grades" I guess that I'm bitching about.


http://www.centralpark2000.com/maps/...nners_full.htm


3 times around and you're really dying for some flat open road, trust me.

knary 09-17-2006 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perry
Oh don't get me wrong, I know it ain't shit (I did the hills of North Shore Long island last wknd 24m each day, but it's a constant up and down, and although short hills like I said, there's never really any flatspots. It's like a small rollercoaster.

I was wondering who would do the research...:lol3

It's the "grades" I guess that I'm bitching about.


http://www.centralpark2000.com/maps/...nners_full.htm


3 times around and you're really dying for some flat open road, trust me.

So when can I visit?
:lurk

Zodiac 09-17-2006 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by knary
So when can I visit?
:lurk




Heartbreak Hill: W108
Appropriately named Heartbreak Hill, this steep
incline after 108th Street winds its way through
the North Woods in many treacherous curves.
Getting to this point is something to be avoided
for the less experienced runners who may have a
bit of difficulty with the demanding climb.
Reaching the summit might be a victory for runners,
but its steady drop is particularly dangerous for
in-line skaters who can easily lose themselves
in the steep incline. Only the most experienced
skaters or runners should consider this potentially
stressful route.
Not withstanding its dangers it is still one of the
most scenic landscapes along the loop.
Watch out for the bikers who race along the
winding curves.


Anytime (cept for this week, I'm on the GS:evil ) as long as you don't mind sleeping on a couch in a studio apt....:1drink

2whlrcr 09-17-2006 05:46 PM

This route is right out my door and has plenty of short steep hills. A couple of climbs go for a mile or so, but most are only a quarter, to half a mile. But they are plenty steep. I took my other GPS out on my Adventure and measure the vertical gain with the altimeter.

Only 1600 feet. I thought it would be 2000-2500 feet. Longest climb was a gain of 400 feet over about a mile, maybe less. The tougher ones are the ones where you are only gaining 150 feet or so, but in quarter mile increments.

When I'm riding well, I'll do two loops. But unfortunately riding well for me had been more than several years ago.:cry

http://gooligan.smugmug.com/photos/93244999-M.jpg

Zodiac 09-17-2006 05:51 PM

Little Central Park history-

"Much of the rich history that predates Central Park is the result of the rugged topography that defines what we now call the Upper Park landscape. Visitors to the Harlem Meer, the Ravine, and the Great Hill, can step back in time to the days of the American Revolution or the War of 1812.



The steep bluffs bordering the southern shoreline of the Harlem Meer were a significant military site during both wars. From the bluffs the northern part of Manhattan was visible, as was the Long Island Sound. The major road linking Manhattan with cities on the mainland to the north went through a break in the bluffs that was named McGown's Pass after the owners of a nearby tavern. In 1776, British and Hessian troops sealed off lower Manhattan from colonial armies by controlling the pass and defending it through a series of fortifications. British and Hessian troops occupied the fortifications along the bluffs until the end of the Revolutionary war. Camps for the soldiers were erected on what is now the Great Hill and the North and East Meadows."

Zodiac 09-17-2006 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2whlrcr
This route is right out my door and has plenty of short steep hills. A couple of climbs go for a mile or so, but most are only a quarter, to half a mile. But they are plenty steep. I took my other GPS out on my Adventure and measure the vertical gain with the altimeter.

Only 1600 feet. I thought it would be 2000-2500 feet. Longest climb was a gain of 400 feet over about a mile, maybe less. The tougher ones are the ones where you are only gaining 150 feet or so, but in quarter mile increments.

When I'm riding well, I'll do two loops. But unfortunately riding well for me had been more than several years ago.:cry

http://gooligan.smugmug.com/photos/93244999-M.jpg



I still haven't gotten past 41mph, and only 32 in CPark.

knary 09-17-2006 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Perry
Heartbreak Hill: W108
Appropriately named Heartbreak Hill, this steep
incline after 108th Street winds its way through
the North Woods in many treacherous curves.
Getting to this point is something to be avoided
for the less experienced runners who may have a
bit of difficulty with the demanding climb.
Reaching the summit might be a victory for runners,
but its steady drop is particularly dangerous for
in-line skaters who can easily lose themselves
in the steep incline. Only the most experienced
skaters or runners should consider this potentially
stressful route.
Not withstanding its dangers it is still one of the
most scenic landscapes along the loop.
Watch out for the bikers who race along the
winding curves.


Anytime (cept for this week, I'm on the GS:evil ) as long as you don't mind sleeping on a couch in a studio apt....:1drink

Rough calculation from the elevations I can find shows it to be an 8% slope(climbs 85' in 1/3 mile - did I do the math right? :lol2). Whatever the size of the hills around you, they define what a hard hill is for you (applies to a lot more than riding, eh?).

I fiddled around with Gmap, and produced the following elevation map for the 23 mile ride up to Larch. I haven't mapped out the route we took down.
http://knary.smugmug.com/photos/96017800-L.jpg

knary 09-17-2006 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2whlrcr
This route is right out my door and has plenty of short steep hills. A couple of climbs go for a mile or so, but most are only a quarter, to half a mile. But they are plenty steep. I took my other GPS out on my Adventure and measure the vertical gain with the altimeter.

Only 1600 feet. I thought it would be 2000-2500 feet. Longest climb was a gain of 400 feet over about a mile, maybe less. The tougher ones are the ones where you are only gaining 150 feet or so, but in quarter mile increments.

When I'm riding well, I'll do two loops. But unfortunately riding well for me had been more than several years ago.:cry

http://gooligan.smugmug.com/photos/93244999-M.jpg

:clap

terry.mc 09-17-2006 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2whlrcr

Man 50 is screaming on skinny tires.

I'm sure there are lots of places to do that out here, but I seem to be locked at 40 ~ 42 in my normal road bike ride.

My mountain bike loop has a little rough 2 track where 32 ~ 35 can pop up if you hammer. It seems alot faster doing 30 down a trail on a mnt bike than on my WR :1drink


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