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PMC 05-27-2010 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trailer Rails
Not all shops who sell QBP can order Salsa. They make you sign a separate dealer agreement to sell them. The commitment is not much, maybe 9 or 10 bikes. Not all shops can do that.

Yep, totally true but it seems like most good size shops around here can get them. Saying that I live in the same town QBP is located so maybe we're Salsa heavy around here :D

I really want a Vaya if for no other reason that I haven't got a new bike in a couple of years.

Gummee! 05-27-2010 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cat0020
Is the actual stem on your bike as short as pictured? that could be the main contributing factor to the twitchyness. Get a longer stem and some riser handlebar, that may require to run new/longer cables. Get some wider tires, that would reduce pinch flat likelyhood.
If that doesn't improve things, try going to a fork with a longer rake/trail.. may have to have a custom steel fork made.. 47mm or even 50mm, cost should be under $200.

Its the other way: more rake = twitchier. Less rake = more stable.

I can't explain it in math terms, so if yer wondering WhyTF that is, google is yer friend.

M

SaltWindandFire 05-27-2010 06:50 PM

29 Hardtail?
 
After visiting the only local shop I'm willing to deal with, now I'm thinking a hardtail 29 with a lockout on the front shock would be right up the old alley. Any recommendations? I rode the new Giant 29 today and really liked it.

SaltWindandFire 05-27-2010 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
Unfortunately, you're going lose your tailend trying to unload it; maybe 50 cents on the dollar. So, that's about $850. Will the same dealer help you out and take it in on trade?

Salsa is a QBP-owned company and any shop can get one for you.

The Giant FCR is basically a flat-bar road bike. Unfortunately, Giant doesn't list complete specs on their site and I no longer have an '09 catalog. So, I don't know the rake and trail numbers, but, the headtube angle and chainstay length are nearly identical to the Defy (drop-bar version of your bike). I'm not sure a stem will cure the twitchiness, as the bike may have a short trail number. The twitchiness may be something you have to get used to (guessing you've never owned a true road bike).



This is a flat-bar bike. It positions the rider more upright, which puts the majority of your weight onto your butt. If you were more leaned forward, that would transfer more weight onto your hands; balancing your weight. Adding a longer stem would shift you more forward and could potentially slow the steering and twitchiness. Your LBS should have a stem selection, or old takeoffs, that you can experiment with. Think about your weight spread over an upside-down triangle (bars, saddle, and pedals) and trying to balance it out to your feeling/tolerance.

The FCR doesn't come with a saddle that accommodates larger or heavier people. It's a fairly lightweight plastic piece that has easily compressed foam padding. I'd recommend looking at a Brooks B17 saddle [found here (< 6 month return policy) or here]. It's the widest seat they offer and made of leather. The leather conforms to your butt, as it stretches at your contact points. This is a saddle that, properly cared for, will last your lifetime. You take this seat with you to your next bike.

If I were your bike shop, I wouldn't have sold this bike to you, to begin with. Your weight needs to be considered, first. 25mm tires, lightweight road wheels with low spoke counts, and a AL/carbon frame are not in your favor. Most road bikes are designed for under-200lb riders. Therefore, the frames are built as light as possible to that target weight. You'll have to have something custom-built, if you want a trick road bike.

I think the Fargo will be a much better fit. It's a pretty HD piece of machinery, designed to carry weight. It won't be as fast and efficient as your FCR, but, that's the tradeoff to have something durable. Notice, too, that it has an upright seating position. So, you'll probably be facing the same scenario with saddle selection. Again, the Brooks would be a nice addition.

Lastly, don't be afraid to move stuff around to achieve your optimum fit; the shop's fit is just a starting point. Record initial measurements of where the shop positions things. If something doesn't feel right, start moving one thing at a time, in small increments. Pay attention to what your body is telling you at various pressure points. Then, think about which adjustment would alter the feeling at that point. Fit is pretty easy, when it's looked at like that. Here's some additional reading on the topic.

Forgot to ask: Are you wearing chamois-equipped, cycling shorts? Have you considered the Salsa Vaya or the Rocky Mountain Sherpa? Both, can accept fatter tires, but, not MTB fat.

Like you, "Askel" is a beast of man (< stated in absolute awe). He'll be able to offer further help on Clydesdale equipment.

I really appreciate the help, by the way.

trailer Rails 05-27-2010 08:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SaltWindandFire
After visiting the only local shop I'm willing to deal with, now I'm thinking a hardtail 29 with a lockout on the front shock would be right up the old alley. Any recommendations? I rode the new Giant 29 today and really liked it.

Nothing wrong with going with a 29er except if you are going to do a lot of road miles the MTB geometry might be a little slow. The vast amount of tires you can put on one of those bikes is amazing.

The Salsa Fargo is just a 29er with drop bars. You can also look at a Surly Crosscheck, you can fit some small 29er tires on there.

Askel 05-27-2010 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SaltWindandFire
After visiting the only local shop I'm willing to deal with, now I'm thinking a hardtail 29 with a lockout on the front shock would be right up the old alley. Any recommendations? I rode the new Giant 29 today and really liked it.


Check out the Kona Kahuna line. Very clyde friendly bike. I've done a couple 75+ mile races on it, commuted on it, and ridden all kinds of single track. Not quite the all-rounder my 'cross bike is, but close. Only real complaint is the front derailer limits rear tire clearance, but that's kind of problem endemic to all 29ers, not just my bike.

You should still tell us where and who you plan to ride with. There's a pretty vast difference between a drop bar bike like the Fargo and a traditional 29er. One you might be really happy with, the other, equally miserable.

SaltWindandFire 05-28-2010 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Askel
You should tell us where and who you plan to ride with. There's a pretty vast difference between a drop bar bike like the Fargo and a traditional 29er. One you might be really happy with, the other, equally miserable.

This would be for mainly urban getting around, occasionally some single track in the hill country, and maybe (dreaming) a sprint distance tri locally.

ducnut 05-28-2010 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SaltWindandFire
This would be for mainly urban getting around, occasionally some single track in the hill country, and maybe (dreaming) a sprint distance tri locally.

The Giant Talon 29er (assuming that's what you rode) is a lot of bike for the money.

However, I wouldn't even consider fighting that much bike in a triathlon. I'd buy a bike for your everyday use and rent a road bike for the triathlons. My GF competes in triathlons and I TT most Wednesday nights. There's a massive efficiency difference between my Anthem and Trinity. Something we've noticed, at events, is seeing someone who'll come out of the water in the top-10 only to come off the bike in 150th because they rode a MTB.

My LBS rents Giant Defy road bikes at $25/day, with a complete fit. If one wanted to test ride a tri bike, they'll do a fit and bring it out to the Wednesday night TT for you to ride, same with Zipp wheels. That's the way they sell stuff; let you spend some time with the product and experience the difference.

Oznerol 05-28-2010 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gummee!
Its the other way: more rake = twitchier. Less rake = more stable.

Actually, it seems like there's some confusion on this because the motorcycle and bicycle world use different terms and conventions for the same things. In the moto world, Cat0020 is right: Rake is the angle of the steering axis as measured from an imaginary vertical line, and more rake means a more 'laid back' steering angle and a more stable bike.

Wikipedia has a pretty good rundown on the differing conventions:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle...ing_axis_angle

EvilGenius 05-28-2010 09:49 AM

Anyone in here race in velodromes?

I shot a couple of races at the super drone in Frisco, TX back in highschool.

Never seen one before, but it was pretty awesome.

I might go back soon, looks like they race every Friday.

RichBeBe 05-28-2010 10:09 AM

Currently do not have any kind of commute with my bicycle, but that is likely going to change to a bit of one. I also want to do some more touring. Currently I have a Bianchi Axis CX with rear racks, and fenders. But rode a Surly LHT and loved it. Don't think I want to build form scratch but I think I want disc brakes. The only reasonably priced steel touring bike I see is the Kona Sutra. Anyone have any opinions about it? Or any other options in the sub-$1500 range?

Bimble 05-28-2010 10:44 AM

It's a double, but the Salsa Vaya just squeaks in under $1500.

Askel 05-28-2010 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SaltWindandFire
This would be for mainly urban getting around, occasionally some single track in the hill country, and maybe (dreaming) a sprint distance tri locally.


Those are three pretty different needs. Sounds like a good excuse to buy 4 bikes. :lol3

Anyway, the instant you start looking at riding singletrack, I say just get a proper mountain bike with flat bars. It's really the best tool for the job. Too many compromises trying to make something else work.

A good mountain bike *could* be pressed into urban duty, but it's slightly less than ideal. Look for rack and fender accommodations to start. 700c wheels as found on a 29er give you lots of tire options too. The geometry of a mountain bike isn't really good for long distances though, so if you're starting to ride more than 20 miles or so at a stretch, there are much better options.

As for the tri? Unless you're going to take triathlons really, really seriously- go out and thrown down on the 29er.

With knobbies. Preferably the fattest you can find.

And leave the fork unlocked and just sort of bob your way past people weaving all over the road in their aerobars.

:D

Gummee! 05-28-2010 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Anyone in here race in velodromes?

I shot a couple of races at the super drone in Frisco, TX back in highschool.

Never seen one before, but it was pretty awesome.

I might go back soon, looks like they race every Friday.

:wave

I tell people if the biggest hill I hafta climb again is the banking of the velodrome, I'll be a happy camper. Denver/CO Springs has a track apiece. :nod

:ricky

I can't wait!

Its actually the safest racing I've ever done. YOU don't turn, the track does! Oh, and everybody accelerates and decelerates at about the same speed. No sudden coasting. :nono

M

Mr Head 05-28-2010 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
Anyone in here race in velodromes?

I shot a couple of races at the super drone in Frisco, TX back in highschool.

Never seen one before, but it was pretty awesome.

I might go back soon, looks like they race every Friday.

Colorado Springs Olympic Training Center Velodrome:
http://mr-head.smugmug.com/Cycling/S...V9keS-X2-1.jpg

We used to run down there from Denver area back in the day.
I got to work some races as an official. Best seat in the house is "Sponge Monitor". Nelson Vales coming by under full steam was very, very cool.:eek1


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