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Stinez 06-04-2010 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
I'm no road bike expert, but I love my Roubaix. When I got mine last Fall I was looking for something that would help me get more pleasure out of the road riding that I do to get out and keep fit when I can't mountain bike. It did that, and then some -- road riding doesn't feel like a "consolation prize" any more. It's a seriously great machine for cranking out long miles, and it's fine for a quick 1-2 hour blast, as well. My dirt-to-pavement ratio has probably gone from about 5:1 to 2:1 since I got this bike.

I'm pretty sure that it's only starting in 2009 that all the Roubaix models have been full carbon. Before that, they had both aluminum and carbon bikes under the Roubaix name. So a 4 or 5 year old Roubaix may be an aluminum bike. But that's no reason to reject it, particularly if you're looking more for a 'try out road riding' bike rather than one you're hoping to live with for many years.

Thanks!

My wife had some good points today.

To paraphrase:
"When have you ever not liked a toy you've bought? :scratch
"What's the last toy you sold?" :dunno
"How many time have you bought used and regretted it?" :yikes
"Go buy the new one because you know you'll use it" :nod

She's got my cheap ass rethinking the idea. :evil

IF I buy new it'll be a Roubaix. :deal

PS I was just sent THIS link about the older Roubiax Elite Triple.

Dahveed 06-04-2010 02:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I rode on Brooks Pro leather saddles in the early-mid 70s, and have ZERO desire to go back to those things, they only have poseur value now, and belong on one of those fixie cafe bikes that gets ridden a few blocks to be parked in front of the espresso stand, or on a fully restored cherry 60s/70s euro bike that came with them originally, and then only for authenticity... They not only require extensive break-in, you also need to wax them frequently, and god save you if they get wet.

LOL, I know a couple of randonneurs that ride Brooks saddles. They'll get a laugh that an asshole on a motorcycle forum considers them "poseurs".

Lobby 06-04-2010 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
Numb hands is called "cyclist palsy"

The gel gloves can also be a big help here. Also they make gel handlebar tape.

The brooks saddles are the corbins of the bike world. Except Brooks has been making saddles forever. Selle Antomica is another Brooks type saddle that has been modified. Racers don't favor the Brooks saddles cause they tend to be heavy and they're not forgiving in the rain. Long distance people tend to love the Brooks saddles. The B17 is the classic. You'll need help figuring out if your a narrow or wide. Brooks saddles need an extensive break-in period. They're made of leather.

Once again, Advrider brings the goods. Heck, I've been searching Bike forums for a long time on this topic, and all I've ever gotten is "your bike doesn't fit," and "strengthen your core muscles."

EvilGenius 06-04-2010 02:49 PM

My legs weren't as straight as I thought so I raised the seat about 1.5".

Also tilted the seat a little more forward and slapped on an $8 headlight for good measure.

Blacknblue 06-04-2010 02:57 PM

My "pre-softened" Brooks professional on my Bianchi hybrid didn't take any time to break in. It's a nice saddle on a classic lugged steel frame. It rocks.

Wadester 06-04-2010 03:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
Numb hands is called "cyclist palsy"

The gel gloves can also be a big help here. Also they make gel handlebar tape.

You could also try ESI grips. A very good shock absorbing material. Now granted, I use the Chunky mtb grips - but more to fill my XXL hands than for extra cushion. 5 Colors. Maintain "tack" even when wet. Don't move around.

Road version ( a bit pricey) :
http://www.esigrips.com/Silicone_Road_Grips.htm


Engineered
Engineered one side thicker for absorbing shock and vibration with the opposite side thinner for bulk-reducing comfort, combined with the best materials and the best production process this creates max shock absorption and grip, while maintaining the lowest weight possible and highest level of durability.

Dahveed 06-04-2010 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilGenius
My legs weren't as straight as I thought so I raised the seat about 1.5".

Also tilted the seat a little more forward and slapped on an $8 headlight for good measure.

1.5 inches is a hugh move. Many pros (Lance Armstrong according to legend) can tell if his saddle is out of alignment by mili-meters. Too high of a saddle can cause you to rock side to side on your saddle and thats not good either. They say you want about 10 degree bend in your leg on extension. Who "they" are and how you measure that is unknown to me.

IHMO, your $8 would have been better spent on a water bottle holder and a bottle.

If your hands are still bothering you after you use the gloves, grips or tape, they raising your handle bars a little.

You are wearing a helmet aren't you?

Nix the tape idea, you can't use it on your bars. Try the grip cushions suggested above.

EvilGenius 06-04-2010 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
1.5 inches is a hugh move. Many pros (Lance Armstrong according to legend) can tell if his saddle is out of alignment by mili-meters. Too high of a saddle can cause you to rock side to side on your saddle and thats not good either. They say you want about 10 degree bend in your leg on extension. Who "they" are and how you measure that is unknown to me.

IHMO, your $8 would have been better spent on a water bottle holder and a bottle.

If your hands are still bothering you after you use the gloves, grips or tape, they raising your handle bars a little.

You are wearing a helmet aren't you?

Nix the tape idea, you can't use it on your bars. Try the grip cushions suggested above.

I already have a bottle and holder.

They did have gel grip gloves, but I was spending too much already, so I'll get them next time.

Even with the 1.5" rise my legs aren't completely extended.

90% of our riding is done at night and long stretches of the bike trails have no lighting what so ever.

I haven found a helmet I like in my size yet, pretty much everything around here besides the LBS sells helmets almost exclusively in kid sizes.

slackmeyer 06-04-2010 05:10 PM

For riding on the street, you want the saddle to be on the high side- you should be able to pedal smoothly without fully extending your leg, and without rocking your hips back and forth. The highest point that you can still do this is probably darn close to the right saddle position. And yes, it makes a big enough difference that adjustments of 1/8" to 1/4" are the norm.

slackmeyer 06-04-2010 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
LOL, I know a couple of randonneurs that ride Brooks saddles. They'll get a laugh that an asshole on a motorcycle forum considers them "poseurs".

Plenty of the double century and up guys that I meet around here ride them, too- and it's not because they like toting around the extra weight for 14 hours at a stretch. Whatever works for your ass though.

Speaking of which, one of those double century guys was kind enough to give me the results of years of research on various bicycle shorts- so I got a pair of Boure bibs now. Don't have a lot of miles on them yet, but they seem very nice.

ducnut 06-04-2010 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oznerol
I'm pretty sure that it's only starting in 2009 that all the Roubaix models have been full carbon. Before that, they had both aluminum and carbon bikes under the Roubaix name.

Actually, the aluminum bikes were call the Sequoia and Sequoia Elite. I bought an Elite in '07, as I couldn't afford the Roubaix, at the time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pierce
I'll take a Specialized "Body Geometry" saddle or similar over a Brooks any day.

I rode on Brooks Pro leather saddles in the early-mid 70s, and have ZERO desire to go back to those things, they only have poseur value now, and belong on one of those fixie cafe bikes that gets ridden a few blocks to be parked in front of the espresso stand, or on a fully restored cherry 60s/70s euro bike that came with them originally, and then only for authenticity... They not only require extensive break-in, you also need to wax them frequently, and god save you if they get wet.

For touring (eg, non-race), I'd probably go with the Specialized Milano (I have an older Milano on my cruiser in fact, but my cruiser is somewhat more forward sitting than most and has a riding position more like a mountain bike in many respects). For a more hard core roadie bike, maybe the Avatar or similar, I dunno. wow, they've gotten expensive at the high end :eek1 Selle and Fizik Vitesse are good high end roadie saddles, too.

The Specialized saddles are decent, I have an Avatar 143 on my tri bike. I've been on the Jett 143, too. And, found it really comfortable. However, over longer distances (50+ miles), I find my sitbones on the seat pans. I've tried a variety of plastic saddles and all their foams compress over distance.

As for your Brooks Professional experience, that's the thickest leather and, therefore, stiffest saddle they offer. Also, it's narrower and crowned compared to the B17, which is wider and flatter. The standard and pre-aged lines are much more forgiving. They don't need much maintenance; a few applications of proofride, neatsfoot oil, saddlesoap, etc, per year is it. They can get wet. You just wouldn't want to leave it out in a rainstorm for an extended time period. Coat, both, top and bottom and it'll be good to go.

I've tried everything Fizik has to offer (LBS has the full demo selection) and can't even comprehend calling one comfortable. Overpriced plastic in my eyes.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Stinez
My wife had some good points today.

To paraphrase:
"When have you ever not liked a toy you've bought? :scratch
"What's the last toy you sold?" :dunno
"How many time have you bought used and regretted it?" :yikes
"Go buy the new one because you know you'll use it" :nod

She's got my cheap ass rethinking the idea. :evil

IF I buy new it'll be a Roubaix. :deal

PS I was just sent THIS link about the older Roubiax Elite Triple.

Nothing wrong with used stuff. You'll find slightly used bicycles are around 60 cents, or less, on the dollar over buying new. I got my Tricross of eBay for $1315 shipped on a $2200 MSRP. So, don't fear buying other than new.

As for your link, you can go to the Specialized site, pick on "bikes", and the archives link is at the bottom of the pulldown. It goes back to '02.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Dahveed
LOL, I know a couple of randonneurs that ride Brooks saddles. They'll get a laugh that an asshole on a motorcycle forum considers them "poseurs".

^^^ +1 :lol3

A local roadie has over 50,000 miles on a single B17. He's done 27,000+ miles in the last two years at 60-something years old. I've huge respect for him.

ducnut 06-04-2010 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slackmeyer
Speaking of which, one of those double century guys was kind enough to give me the results of years of research on various bicycle shorts- so I got a pair of Boure bibs now. Don't have a lot of miles on them yet, but they seem very nice.

^^^ Saved the link.

slackmeyer 06-04-2010 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ducnut
^^^ Saved the link.

Just so you know, don't expect a lot of gel padding from these shorts- they've got a fairly minimal pad, but it breathes well, and the fit and quality are top notch, IMHO. Their philosophy is that you can't make up for a bad saddle with more chamois.

But what it really comes down to is: their spokesman is Ned Overend. Awsomeness is assured.

pierce 06-04-2010 06:14 PM

ah, found out what my chain cleaner is, guess its only a few years old, my old one musta rotted away and I replaced it, maybe 5 or so years back, with a Pedro Tools Chain Kit. I found the lame bottles of the non-petroleum cleaner and "bio" lube that i used once and found my chain rusty 2 days later, so I never used again. I'll stick with WD40 as the cleaner and Triflow as the lube, dankyaverymuch (yeah, yeah, I know, people say Triflow attracts dirt like a magnet etc etc. I apply it very sparingly, then wipe the chain down multiple passes with a clean rag).

http://www.pedros.com/product/chainm...MachineKit.jpg


wow, took the chain rings off the older 3x7 speed GT mountain bike to clean them before cleaning the mud-encrusted chain.... and WTF, all three rings on this Shimano "A" crankset are.... SPOTWELDED together??!? :eek1 rings have the whackiest looking teeth I've seen, angled every which way, and there's a sticker "Use Shimano I.G. Chain Only" ... Is this just cheap junk, and I should ditch it? I think its a circa 1997 $550 MSRP hardtail, steel frame, mostly Alivio parts.

Dahveed 06-04-2010 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slackmeyer
Their philosophy is that you can't make up for a bad saddle with more chamois.

But what it really comes down to is: their spokesman is Ned Overend. Awsomeness is assured.

True Dat! on both accounts.

There are many different saddles and saddle designs out there. You've just got to find the one that works for your backside. My earlier irritation was with the "if you use this, you're a poser" attitude. Anyone that is riding their bike is NOT a poser in my book. Even if you're only riding it a mile or 2 to the book store, hey you're still riding. I think its counterproductive to judge people based on their riding or gear. If you have the cash and you want to have a $8,000 bike to do your 20 miles on the local bike trail. Well do it. Lets remember its these type of people that keep the used bike (and motorcycle) market stocked with lightly used product that the rest of us buy for considerable savings. :deal

On USED Aluminum framed bikes, I had heard that aluminum frames have a lifetime. That the frame wears over the miles depending on the power applied to it. Don't know if its true or what the life is, but I'd look into it before purchasing a USED aluminum frame. Apparently titanium and steel has a longer life span. I'd be a little leery of USED carbon fiber bikes, not due to wear, but if the frame was handled wrong, it could be damaged and not really noticeable.


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