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-   -   Killboy failure Dragon Fest (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=454662)

duoderf 05-28-2011 07:42 PM

wow/thread

I can say though that I have been passed on both sides by oncoming traffic in my lane on deals gap, fun road, before and after the crowds clear out

majlee_vmi 05-29-2011 12:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by enduro0125 (Post 16029570)
Trail braking

Learn it. :deal

Okay, I've read the article. Theoretically, I understand it, but how do I learn it? Obviously, sounds like I need to go and find a track course and be taught the technique by an expert in order to properly learn it.
Thoughts? Suggestions?

manfromthestix 05-29-2011 05:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by majlee_vmi (Post 16031189)
Okay, I've read the article. Theoretically, I understand it, but how do I learn it? Obviously, sounds like I need to go and find a track course and be taught the technique by an expert in order to properly learn it.
Thoughts? Suggestions?

I learned about trail braking starting about 45 years ago when I was first getting into competition riding on dirt bikes (motocross, enduros, trials, etc.). I learned a lot of very valuable lessons at relatively low cost :D in all my years of riding in the dirt. The trails/roads are always rough and, unless you're riding on slick rock at Moab or someplace, it's almost ALWAYS limited traction so you have to compensate by use of throttle, brakes, lean angle, moving around on the bike, letting the bike move around under you, etc. I think the vast majority of skills I've learned in the dirt translate very nicely to road riding, but road riding skills don't translate so well to the dirt.

If you haven't already tried it, I highly recommend getting a little dirt bike and flogging it around out in the boonies, crash it a bunch of times (yes, you will) and then getting back on your street bike and see how that feels. It's a very valuable way to round out your motorcycling education and REALLY FUN too!

Doug

P.S. Does your handle majlee_VMI mean you are an alumnus of Virginia Military Institute? We live right outside Lexington where VMI is located...

majlee_vmi 05-29-2011 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manfromthestix (Post 16031753)
Doug

P.S. Does your handle majlee_VMI mean you are an alumnus of Virginia Military Institute? We live right outside Lexington where VMI is located...


Doug,
Yep, I'm one of the "crowd of honorable youth pressing up the hill..." escapees. Appreciate the advice - I'll have to find some time and a place to try this once I get back.

How is Lexington these days - been years since I've been back there.

Lee

dolomoto 05-29-2011 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by majlee_vmi (Post 16031189)
Okay, I've read the article. Theoretically, I understand it, but how do I learn it? Obviously, sounds like I need to go and find a track course and be taught the technique by an expert in order to properly learn it.
Thoughts? Suggestions?

Trail Braking is a key skill taught in the MSF Military Sportbike Rider Course (and nearly identical to the MSF ARC-ST).

Tripped1 05-29-2011 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reryder (Post 16029535)
You can, but you really have to know what you are doing. For many, it is just a good way to fall off.

Your tires only have X amount of traction.
1. If corning forces (centrifugal/centriptal) are using say 90 per cent of X, then you have less than 10 per cent of X available for braking. Very dodgy.
2. On the other hand, if cornering forces are using only 10 per cent of X, then you have almost 90 per cent of traction available for braking.

Unfortunately, when riders get into a corner too hot, they are usually closer to scenario 1 than 2.

Sometimes, I've rarely seen people lowside because they were so hot the bike ran out of lateral traction, usually their form is bad causing excessive lean, or they "run out of talent" and try to brake, not trail brake initiate braking, which is often a loosing proposition. Particularly if your form is hosed and you are already dragging hard parts.

If you have good form and you are dragging shit SLOW THE HELL DOWN, there is no prize money for riding beyond the machine's mechanical limits.

hellfire76 05-29-2011 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SgtDuster (Post 16013374)
Right on! So where are yours? :wink:


The pics of myself on the Killboy site are not worthy of being in this thread, I stayed on my side of the yellow line.

B.Curvin 05-29-2011 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wheedle (Post 16028397)
You folks realize that you can brake while cornering... actually very hard given adequate traction. Even without ABS...

Just saying... there seems to be some 'never touch the brakes in a corner' sentiment here...


Unpossible! You'll die a fiery death and burn to ashes.








:D









:evil





http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...yboys06007.jpg

It's extra fun in the dirt cause you can tuck the front then catch it with the throttle.

:wink:

Riteris 05-29-2011 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hellfire76 (Post 16034535)
The pics of myself on the Killboy site are not worthy of being in this thread, I stayed on my side of the yellow line.

That is boring. I want you to go back there and keep trying it until you get it wrong.:D

Tripped1 05-29-2011 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by B.Curvin (Post 16034646)
Unpossible! You'll die a fiery death and burn to ashes.


It's extra fun in the dirt cause you can tuck the front then catch it with the throttle.

:wink:


Ok I got to ask.....where is your wind screen :D

xcgates 05-29-2011 02:26 PM

I'm more focused on the amount of suspension travel that has been used up.:lol3

Tripped1 05-29-2011 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xcgates (Post 16034783)
I'm more focused on the amount of suspension travel that has been used up.:lol3

That isn't unusual at all for a bike that is full tilt boogie around a corner, the bikes only have a little over 5" of suspension travel, you SHOULD be a little over center sitting on the bike, squishing 2" off before apex is completely normal.

I've caught mine 10mm off mechanical bottom and I only did three laps to warm the tires and check new suspension adjustments (SAG already set I may add), I wasn't going full bore.

Dranrab Luap 05-29-2011 02:38 PM

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g1...nard/K1111.jpg

xcgates 05-29-2011 02:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tripped1 (Post 16034803)
That isn't unusual at all for a bike that is full tilt boogie around a corner, the bikes only have a little over 5" of suspension travel, you SHOULD be a little over center sitting on the bike, squishing 2" off before apex is completely normal.

I've caught mine 10mm off mechanical bottom and I only did three laps to warm the tires and check new suspension adjustments (SAG already set I may add), I wasn't going full bore.

Ahh, never done the whole full-tilt cornering. Something about starting on an old, wobbly UJM cured me of trying to drag hard parts. :lol3

Tripped1 05-29-2011 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xcgates (Post 16034867)
Ahh, never done the whole full-tilt cornering. Something about starting on an old, wobbly UJM cured me of trying to drag hard parts. :lol3

Indeed, a track prepped SV is another monster, that is for sure.


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