ADVrider

ADVrider (http://www.advrider.com/forums/index.php)
-   The perfect line and other riding myths (http://www.advrider.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=23)
-   -   Killboy failure Dragon Fest (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=454662)

lethe 03-30-2012 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klaviator (Post 18342098)
For all of you who keep saying the street is not a racetrack:




<embed src="https://www.youtube.com/v/AxHzwWndtvk?version=3&feature=player_detailpage" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" height="360" width="640">


:eek1

OK, on a more serious note. This race is held on public roads. Not once did I see a double yellow line. How do the people who live on the Isle of man survive?

people must have more common sense there. I blame McDonalds

geg 03-30-2012 01:28 PM

a step beyond Isle of Man

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/n6fdBz7zLrg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

tjoseph 03-30-2012 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geg (Post 18341964)
so you disagree that there are too many double yellows and childishly low speed limits or?

in VT you can pass on the double yellow.. which is a nice touch.

No, I'm not disagreeing that there are too many double yellow lines. If you want to ignore them, have at it. I obey them whether or not I think they're silly, mostly because I expect the person coming the other way to do the same. My point there is civil disobedience has a price. As long as you're perfectly okay paying that price, have at it. I usually reserve my performance riding for track days. If I want to gamble with a life, I try to make sure it's mine and not anybody else's. The rationale that "I thought it was safe" gets made in nearly every vehicular homicide case. Like I said before, I just saw an innocent person's life get snuffed out right in front of me two weekends ago because the other driver thought it was perfectly safe to drive as he was driving. My goal is to never be either of those persons. Your goals may differ. I'm an old fart. I've learned that humans are not infallible. I'm lucky it didn't take an injury or worse to teach me that lesson. You want to ride in someone else's lane? Feel free.

klaviator 03-30-2012 01:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geg (Post 18342157)
a step beyond Isle of Man

<iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/n6fdBz7zLrg" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>

:thumb cool video.

I noticed that there are no double yellow lines here either. How is it that nearly everyone in Ireland hasn't been killed in head on traffic accidents??

GoGoGavin41 03-30-2012 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klaviator (Post 18342098)
For all of you who keep saying the street is not a racetrack:




<embed src="https://www.youtube.com/v/AxHzwWndtvk?version=3&feature=player_detailpage" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" height="360" width="640"></object>


:eek1

OK, on a more serious note. This race is held on public roads. Not once did I see a double yellow line. How do the people who live on the Isle of man survive?<a href="%3Cobject%20style=" height:="" 390px;="" width:="" 640px"=""><object style="height: 390px; width: 640px">
</object>

A tad bit off topic... but it seems to me that the TT would be one of the best ways to get international moto-racing recognition, but no one really wants to do it because it's so dangerous (I remember a few years ago there was a lot of press about some GP guy who was maybe going to participate but ended up not). Is this accurate, that is, is the TT a gateway to just a cult following? I don't really follow racing enough to know if Isle of Mann is a portal to big name sponsorship (the only person I know who seems to be very well recognized is Dunlop, but I think he did solely TT).

viverrid 03-30-2012 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 211Chuck (Post 18340713)
You have your opinion and I respect that... But for me as an EX factory road racer I learned using every inch of
available pavement to get the perfect (FAST) line is the proper way of riding fast on the track. IMO if you are on
a stretch of nice turns on a road clear of on coming traffic there is no big deal about using every inch of the road
available to you to go much faster then just riding in your lane.

An F1 driver could get around the track faster if he cut through the chicanes instead of ran around them. On a lot of NASCAR tracks a driver could make an easy pass if went "below the line". But those are cheats. On the street your every available inch is every available inch IN YOUR LANE.

I don't get why someone would go out of their way to find a twisty road to ride on, and then straighten the curves to go faster. If you just want to go faster, stick to the Interstate. OF COURSE you can go faster if you cut the curves on the street. Is that really the point of finding a curvy public road? It is NOT closed course racing. Show your skill by how fast you can ride within the lines. You are not riding on the track AND the opposite lane should not be considered "available" for the purposes of going faster, like if you were on the track and passing "below the line" or cutting across the chicane were out of bounds and earned you a penalty full stop.

Cutting the curves on the street is just lazy riding.

hitmanh 03-30-2012 02:41 PM

This in reply to #9147, however the quote system is acting up.

The roads are close during race time, otherwise they'd spend all their time picking bikes out of the front of oncoming traffic. The locals are also VERY biker aware and friendly.
Unfortunately the UK is also doing the same thing and adding more and more double white lines and more restrictive speed limits in places due to the number of fuckwits riding/driving out of their skill zone and ruining some of the really nice runs. Plenty of others around though, for the time being.
Here, though, roads like the dragon are the norm, not the exception, so while double lines can be annoying they also mean you're in a place of very limited visibibilty (due to trees, bends, blind hills, etc) and ignoring them can get very crashy very fast. One plus here is that the standard of driving is a bit higher than the states, so some of the tomfoolery seen in this thread is less common here (certianly for bikers anyway, car drivers can be remarkably incompetent).

MiamiMotorcyclist 03-30-2012 02:45 PM

From what I understand there are portions of the course/road on Isle of Man that are always free of speed restrictions.
Kind of like the Autobahn, though there are less open areas there than in the past due to congestion.

hitmanh 03-30-2012 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MiamiMotorcyclist (Post 18342670)
From what I understand there are portions of the course/road on Isle of Man that are always free of speed restrictions.
Kind of like the Autobahn, though there are less open areas there than in the past due to congestion.

Yes, the isle has it's own road rules, different from the mainland, however, unlike the autobahn, you're not on wide multilane smooth curved roads, so the the practicable speeds are somewhat less than you'll see on an autobahn. Not to say you can't go fast, but the parts where you can are relatively short. Darwinism is a very affective speed restricter :eek1

MiamiMotorcyclist 03-30-2012 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hitmanh (Post 18342698)
Yes, the isle has it's own road rules, different from the mainland, however, unlike the autobahn, you're not on wide multilane smooth curved roads, so the the practicable speeds are somewhat less than you'll see on an autobahn. Not to say you can't go fast, but the parts where you can are relatively short. Darwinism is a very affective speed restricter :eek1

IOM TT racing is very impressive. Scary stuff. Rally racers are also a brave breed.

hitmanh 03-30-2012 02:57 PM

Road racing is seriously mental stuff (TT is famous, but some of the races in ireland are pretty close to), you need either balls of steel or be two cans short of a six pack to do it... probably both! Rallying is another sport in the same vain. Very variable conditions, very little room for error, and no run offs or tyre walls. Love watching both, couldn't do either.

Lion BR 03-30-2012 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by klaviator (Post 18342254)
:thumb cool video.

I noticed that there are no double yellow lines here either. How is it that nearly everyone in Ireland hasn't been killed in head on traffic accidents??

I know you are asking a rhetorical question. Or so I hope. Because your question symbolizes how far we went the wrong direction here in America. It reminds me of the lady who sued McDonald's for burning her crotch with hot coffee. [It is an absurd to think one can make money out of their own stupidity, but that is a separate issues]. But as a result of that now coffee is not served as hot in McDonald's and it comes with warning labels. We are that stupid. And we need the Nannie state to take care of our stupidity. I wish we could use Darwin's principles in rule making.

Okay, driving (riding) is a more dangerous activity and comes with higher risks of fatality. And other people's stupidities may influence people who had nothing to do with the Darwin award someone else was coveting.

But why is it that the people who live in Isle of Man survive without double yellow lines? I will risk to say they engage their brains in the driving/riding process. And they are paying attention. That sums it up.

OldPete 03-30-2012 03:01 PM

And my Avatar is....
 
:lol3 IoM on Mad Sunday is not Deal's Gap or out here in SoCal... Ortega Hwy, Mulholland Rd, Angelus Crest Hwy.

This thread is about pictars on a very crowded two lane double yellow marked road with an uber mix of riders & drivers.

Most of us have ridden narrow paved roads for hours and have not seen much if any traffic.
On dim forested roads high beams are always on so we can see each other several bends ahead or we hope others do such. :deal

ttpete 03-30-2012 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hitmanh (Post 18342732)
Road racing is seriously mental stuff (TT is famous, but some of the races in ireland are pretty close to), you need either balls of steel or be two cans short of a six pack to do it... probably both! Rallying is another sport in the same vain. Very variable conditions, very little room for error, and no run offs or tyre walls. Love watching both, couldn't do either.

It was a GP venue at one time. The hard part is learning almost 38 miles of road. The Dunlops live there and have plenty of opportunities.

MiamiMotorcyclist 03-30-2012 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldPete (Post 18342753)
:lol3 IoM on Mad Sunday is not Deal's Gap or out here in SoCal... Ortega Hwy, Mulholland Rd, Angelus Crest Hwy.

This thread is about pictars on a very crowded two lane double yellow marked road with an uber mix of riders & drivers.

Most of us have ridden narrow paved roads for hours and have not seen much if any traffic.
On dim forested roads high beams are always on so we can see each other several bends ahead or we hope others do such. :deal

And semis, don't forget the semis.

Now back to regularly scheduled pictures and comments.

Here is my pic from Killboy back in 03. He's come a long way with his skills since then.
I was just cruising, those are draggin jeans and I was giving the low wave to the guy with the camera. Didn't know who he was at the time or why he was taking my picture. Found his site two years later and bought the picture.

Oh and it looks like I'm a bit close to the line too. Wasn't very crowded back then and I could usually see a couple turns ahead due to the leaves being off the trees. But I wasn't crossing the lines so save it.
http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/k...t/pict1212.jpg


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:08 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014