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-   -   Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b. (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=563090)

MotoMusicMark 03-26-2010 01:06 PM

Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.
 
I'm doing some research on what would be more helpful to know at a person’s start in motorcycling versus learning it over years in the "school of hard knocks".

Things like..."Don't transport a bike on the centerstand. It might break the frame". or "Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)

Wuwei 03-26-2010 01:27 PM

Be very careful about overtorquing bolts threaded into aluminum castings on motorcycles. Best to back off a bit from recommended torques a bit. Motorcycle bolts and castings tend to need much lower torques than automotive stuff.

bomber60015 03-26-2010 01:36 PM

Things like..."Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

this is simply untrue -- raising up on the pegs will elevated the center of mass of the bike/rider combination.


To add to this thread, "Just because you know HOW to do something, you shouldn't necessarily do it."

This will help you avoid rebuilding carbs at night in the rain in a vain attempt to cure the out of fuel condition in which you find yourself.

DAKEZ 03-26-2010 01:45 PM

Stay on track people, He asked a question.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MotoMusicMark
Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)

I have no answer for you as I do not remember starting. It is like asking me the same about walking.

Who remembers such things?

I know others started later in life so I look forward to see how this thread develops.

Welcome to the asylum n00b.

klaviator 03-26-2010 01:59 PM

"It's not the bike, it's the rider"

and "Bigger is not always better"

Too many people think they need a bigger, better faster, etc bike. I started on a small, old bike because I couldn't afford anything more. Eventually, when I could afford it, I got one of the fastest bikes available at the time, a Yamaha FJ1100. It only took a few rides with a bunch of old geezers on their old BMWs to show me that It's not the bike, it's the rider that counts (Yeah, they left me in the dust). When I moved "down" to an EX500, I got a lot faster and had more fun.

YetiGS 03-26-2010 02:08 PM

I wish someone had told me how addicitive it was. :D



Wouldn't have changed anything for me, I just could have better prepared others in my life for it. :lol3

Uncle Ernie 03-26-2010 02:13 PM

I'll drink to those 2 up there ^

Plus; Ride your own ride. Never try to keep up with anyone.

Especially relevant to the ATGATT folks; No matter what you wear- you are invisible. Most drivers don't see you and they're happy that way until you scratch their paint. Never expect a car to do the rational or predictable thing. Never never never.

YetiGS 03-26-2010 02:19 PM

I did hear this one the very first day I rode from my dad who was once a CHP motor officer:

There are old riders and bold riders. There are no old bold riders.

A lot of kids around here need to know that.

duck 03-26-2010 03:45 PM

The bike is better than you are. When you think you've come into a turn too hot, do not chop the throttle, keep it constant and look through the turn.

You're most dangerous to yourself when you think you've mastered motorcycling. This can lead to complacency and bite you. This is an issue for noobs in the 6-12 monnth experience range. There is always room to improve your riding.

johnnyadventurepants 03-26-2010 03:52 PM

Look through the corners, not right in front of you.

tigerboy 03-26-2010 04:14 PM

This thread is still young, so this hasn't been said before. If I could do it all over again, I wish someone would say to me:

Learn how to ride in the dirt, not on the street

Uncle Ernie 03-26-2010 04:45 PM

That one always bothred me. As a person growing up in big cities, I never saw a dirt bike and certainly never heard of anywhere to ride one. Maybe things are different now, but if you live in a city- not everyone can afford a dirt bike AND a pick-up.

bush pilot 03-26-2010 05:05 PM

Keep clear of the hot exhaust pipes!

I still have vestiges of a scar 42 years later, where my Honda minitrail fell on me.
And of course watch out for sudden stops with stationary objects (big logs, tree stumps).:ricky

R-A-M-O-N 03-26-2010 05:46 PM

DONT crash your bike.


It seems stupid but some people specially in cars seems to not care if they risk a turn and crash their vehicle. In a bike it is very important to be extra carefull because any crash could mean a serious injury wether you are wearing gear or not.

If you can do that then everything is fun and games :clap

Chromer 03-26-2010 06:43 PM

You go where you look, so look at where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid.


This still catches me out on occasion. Target fixation is powerful.


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