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-   -   picking 1st bike for the girl (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=853546)

steveyak 01-06-2013 07:05 AM

picking 1st bike for the girl
 
Hey Guys looking for some unbiased input. We are looking to get my girl her first bike she is leaning in the sport direction. She is 5'8" so not a little girl, she has very little riding experience, I've just had her on little xr100 for the last few months. She's been doing really well, looking through turn getting used to controls. So a good student you could say. Ok so the question is do you think an sv650 is to much for someone to have as a first bike and still have a good learning curve, other option we were looking at is ninja 250. Open for suggestions but keep in mind the first bike will have a budget in the $2500 range so small gs's are out of the question on price alone.
Thanks for the input::ear:ear

Nanuq 01-06-2013 07:13 AM

If she has ample time on the 100cc, she should be fine on the 650cc, she will need to get used to it, but with a little time and effort she will be fine. Anything I can do on a 650cc, I learned on a 150cc. Some other questions to consider might be age-is her brain fully developed, particularly her front lobes, the decision making part of the brain? In essence is she going to be responsible enough to make quick decisions with a larger machine in a sketchy traffic or terrain. Secondly, how are her athletic skills in general? If she is naturally athletic she will have no problem adapting her skills and body to a larger bike. These are questions I always ask with my students and with my own kids + family.

BanjoBoy 01-06-2013 07:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steveyak (Post 20408756)
Hey Guys looking for some unbiased input. We are looking to get my girl her first bike she is leaning in the sport direction. She is 5'8" so not a little girl, she has very little riding experience, I've just had her on little xr100 for the last few months. She's been doing really well, looking through turn getting used to controls. So a good student you could say. Ok so the question is do you think an sv650 is to much for someone to have as a first bike and still have a good learning curve, other option we were looking at is ninja 250. Open for suggestions but keep in mind the first bike will have a budget in the $2500 range so small gs's are out of the question on price alone.
Thanks for the input::ear:ear

Them are good choices, ya might wanta consider a GS500 'n EX500 too. (They can be had in her price range. :thumb )
In a perfect world, I think it's best to start out small 'n work her way up to larger bikes. Some peeps are content to ride an Ningette 250 for years, 'n sum folks "out grow" 'em right away. :dunno

Jnich77 01-06-2013 07:18 AM

I don't understand the question... why would you ask about a motorcycle for a woman... why would a lady need such a thing? Exactly how far apart is your kitchen and dining room?

steveyak 01-06-2013 07:20 AM

good skills
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nanuq (Post 20408817)
If she has ample time on the 100cc, she should be fine on the 650cc, she will need to get used to it, but with a little time and effort she will be fine. Anything I can do on a 650cc, I learned on a 150cc. Some other questions to consider might be age-is her brain fully developed, particularly her front lobes, the decision making part of the brain? In essence is she going to be responsible enough to make quick decisions with a larger machine in a sketchy traffic or terrain. Secondly, how are her athletic skills in general? If she is naturally athletic she will have no problem adapting her skills and body to a larger bike. These are questions I always ask with my students and with my own kids + family.

She is a national champion skydiver, so she is pretty good with the quick decisions and/or pressure. What she is still lacking is the muscle memory, and natural reactions. She is very good about respecting her limits.
I have just been riding my whole life so I don't have that open thought to know if a 70hp bike would be alot to someone just starting out(intimidating) or if its what im thinking small enough, smooth enough power to have when you want but not so much to scare you that you may touch it by accident.
Thanks for the input again

steveyak 01-06-2013 07:22 AM

haha
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jnich77 (Post 20408854)
I don't understand the question... why would you ask about a motorcycle for a woman... why would a lady need such a thing? Exactly how far apart is your kitchen and dining room?

She is definitely not your average woman.:lol3

steveyak 01-06-2013 07:27 AM

that may be the answer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BanjoBoy (Post 20408849)
Them are good choices, ya might wanta consider a GS500 'n EX500 too. (They can be had in her price range. :thumb )
In a perfect world, I think it's best to start out small 'n work her way up to larger bikes. Some peeps are content to ride an Ningette 250 for years, 'n sum folks "out grow" 'em right away. :dunno

I forgot about gs500 that may be the perfect bike. I think better power range and same price range. thanks

N-m 01-06-2013 07:33 AM

I see a common mistake in the gun industry all the time where a man will decide on what a woman needs and the woman will let him decide. The wrong choice is often made because it is such a personal choice. I'm not saying this is what is happening here but wanted to help broaden your and her options.

While being an amateur rider myself I can only recommend to anyone they follow the below procedure to ensure they actually want one and are not being led into one:
  1. Decide on what type of riding you want to do. This dramatically narrows options from everything to a segment
  2. Decide on budget. Cuts down on options even further
  3. Sit on or even ride if possible everything out there that can be safely ridden. While you may not have many opportunities to ride I encountered not a single dealer that was against my sitting on everything in their shop when I asked permission
  4. Invest in a moto school like the ones Motorcycle Safety Foundation puts on. For beginner classes they furnish bikes up to 250 cc and you could theoretically ride several different bikes in a weekend on a course.

I hope I haven't overstepped my bounds but just followed that procedure over the course of 3 months and think I have made a great decision. Now next year I may want something different to ride but currently I am thinking about excuses to ride one more mile and not excuses to leave it parked.

steveyak 01-06-2013 07:40 AM

all good
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TNRat (Post 20408967)
I see a common mistake in the gun industry all the time where a man will decide on what a woman needs and the woman will let him decide. The wrong choice is often made because it is such a personal choice. I'm not saying this is what is happening here but wanted to help broaden your and her options.

While being an amateur rider myself I can only recommend to anyone they follow the following procedure to ensure they actually want one and are not being led into one:
  1. Decide on what type of riding you want to do. This dramatically narrows options from everything to a segment
  2. Decide on budget. Cuts down on options even further
  3. Sit on or even ride if possible everything out there that can be safely ridden. While you may not have many opportunities to ride I encountered not a single dealer that was against my sitting on everything in their shop when I asked permission
  4. Invest in a moto school like the ones Motorcycle Safety Foundation puts on. For beginner classes they furnish bikes up to 250 cc and you could theoretically ride several different bikes in a weekend on a course.

I hope I haven't overstepped my bounds but just followed that procedure over the course of 3 months and think I have made a great decision. Now next year I may want something different but ride I am thinking about excuses to ride one more mile and not excuses to leave it parked.

You did not over step.
She doesnt have experience on bikes to know what she wants, but she feels that the turns are where she will enjoy her self the most. budget we set $2500 range. she has sat on many bikes and she is pretty open there, however she has not sat on them at 60mph for a few hours at a time. She is doing msf in march, of course I have her doing that and she is the type to like some coaching anyway.
As for leading her, she started asking me to help her with riding a couple years before we started dating, And i'm not pushing the direction because I was hoping she would take the dual sport route so I could ride the f8 with her but it looks like ill spend more time on the speed triple with her. :D

N-m 01-06-2013 07:42 AM

I wanted to add:

I sat on the bikes you have mind and asked with many sport bike riders. I found in this area there were bikes that were comfortable for about an hour and bikes that would be comfortable for longer rides b/c of the more upright riding position. Personally I thing the more comfortable you are over a longer period of time would be the better route for a new rider since they have one less distraction and can get more time in the saddle if they want w/o having to take a break.

I saw great reviews on the bikes in question and most said they were great for someone starting in the sport area.

steveyak 01-06-2013 07:45 AM

Im also trying to get away from the 250 partially because I feel it is the scariest bike I have ever ridden, just for the fact that it really cant get out of the way with a full sized person on it. I put about 25 miles on one and was scared when I had to pull out into traffic. 22hp doesnt take you very far very fast.

GSAragazzi 01-06-2013 07:58 AM

Without knowing the style of riding (on or off, city or touring etc) I would recommend a Buell Blast. They are simple to maintain, very durable and light.
Also they offer a distinctive fresher "look" bc of under frame exhust, radius mounted font brake etc. HD used these for the riding school which speaks tons about ease of use nd durability plus low cost for repairs.
Either way share your decision.
Cheers

Not my vid but good description:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzgBqRFcVWY&sns=em

bwalsh 01-06-2013 08:05 AM

Ninja 250's are great starter bikes and used, low mile specimens(well under 10,000 miles) can be found in the $1400-$2000 price range.

Spend the rest on a MSF course and good riding gear.:deal

A lot of MSF facilities have a Ninja or two. She may be able to try one before she buys.

If she decides to get one and after she gets used to riding it, she can always sell it for close to what she has in it and get a bigger cc bike.

Quote:

Originally Posted by steveyak
Im also trying to get away from the 250

Just saw this. Well at least get her in a class and get good gear. Don't forget to add gear into that budget.
Good luck! :freaky

Benesesso 01-06-2013 08:17 AM

I think an SV-650 would be ideal. The "S" model has clipons and a windscreen. Power isn't real high, but better than another possibility--an '88-90 Honda Hawk GT. Both bikes are light and real flickable. I rode my Hawk thru the Italian Alps a few times, after making the mistake of taking my '88 Kaw ZX10 the first time.

IIRC the Hawk is 5 speed while the SV is 6. Both great bikes, and it's easy to put clipons on the Hawk from some other Honda-forget which one. Both bikes need something like Race Tech Gold Emulators for the forks-big improvement that I installed in both of mine.

No longer have either Hawk or SV, but if you buy a 2005 yellow SV650 I have a bunch of parts for it. Note the 2005 yellow is different from the 2004 (hint, hint).

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2.../IMG_0050n.jpg

Mr_Gone 01-06-2013 08:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jnich77 (Post 20408854)
I don't understand the question... why would you ask about a motorcycle for a woman... why would a lady need such a thing? Exactly how far apart is your kitchen and dining room?

:rofl:rofl:rofl

That's funny. Politically incorrect, but still funny!


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