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-   -   KTM and torque wrench (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=855524)

mroddis 01-14-2013 10:15 AM

KTM and torque wrench
 
I debated putting this in the Garage section of ADV, but figured it's more specific to my KTM, so here it is...

I'm a relatively new 2006 950 Adventure owner and slowly gettting more and more confident maintaining her. I have been slowly building up my tool set, finding things I need along the way and trying to get a decent set together.

I've been borrowing a torque wrench, but now need to get one myself. I'm hoping people here can offer some advice on a good wrench that will cover the various torque specs needed for our beloved 950. Any tips? Tricks? Advice that you can share to a noob? I'm in Canada but close to the border to maybe some tips for both sides of the border?

I will pay for quality, but I'm also not made of money - always looking for a good deal. Ideally I would only need one (3/8 drive?) that will suffice for all my KTM wrenching needs (my sockets are 3/8 drive). I know the torque specs vary across the entire bike, so looking for something that will serve me best.

Ideas?

Thanks as always,
Matthew.

Orangecicle 01-14-2013 10:50 AM

Good question. I have the same issue. I have a basic Craftsman torque wrench that does not have a ratchet head -- a "Dr. Beam" style. It does not give you enough options for positioning when working on things like spark plugs in a bike with a trellis frame. Get one with a ratchet head.

I thought about this one: http://www.sears.com/craftsman-elect...4&blockType=G4

But the reviews are not so good. It's hard to find one that covers low torque values (15 newtons or so on plugs) and the higher range as well (90 newtons on the rear axle). I hope there are some good suggestions coming. :lurk

WARRIORPRINCEJJ 01-14-2013 10:54 AM

Just my humble opinion...


I think two torque wrenches are a must, no matter what bike you own: a beam-style for the lower values, and a ratchet/standard for the higher values.

For what it's worth, all of mine are Craftsman, and have served me well...



EDIT- If you absolutely needed a ratchet-style, for the lower values, you could consider one in inch/lbs, and do the conversion. However, "conversions" could be a great way to screw-up the math, and snap some parts.

.

el queso 01-14-2013 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WARRIORPRINCEJJ (Post 20481583)
Just my humble opinion..

I think two torque wrenches are a must, no matter what bike you own: a beam-style for the lower values, and a ratchet/standard for the higher values.

For what it's worth, all of mine are Craftsman, and have served me well...

EDIT- If you absolutely needed a ratchet-style, for the lower values, you could consider one in inch/lbs, and do the conversion. However, "conversions" could be a great way to screw-up the math, and snap some parts.

.

I have two older (USA made) Craftsman “Micro-lock” torque wrenches; a 1/2” drive in foot-pounds and a 3/8” in inch-pounds. Both have a Newton-meter scale as well, so no conversions are needed. :evil With a 1/2-3/8 and 3/8-1/4 adapter, I can work on all my vehicles.

WARRIORPRINCEJJ 01-14-2013 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by el queso (Post 20481701)
...Both have a Newton-meter scale as well, so no conversions are needed. :evil...


Now that is nice.

I have an older "in/lbs" TW, but it doesn't have an N/m scale. I haven't used it in years (I believe it's stuck in the bottom of one of my rifle cleaning boxes.)

Whenever I need a wrench for the smaller values, I've just gotten used to grabbin' the beam-style...


.

cdndog 01-14-2013 11:39 AM

Canadian Tire has the 1/2" and 3/8" drive torque wrenches for 60-70% off regularly. Just watch the flyer!

zgfiredude 01-14-2013 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by el queso (Post 20481701)
I have two older (USA made) Craftsman “Micro-lock” torque wrenches; a 1/2” drive in foot-pounds and a 3/8” in inch-pounds. Both have a Newton-meter scale as well, so no conversions are needed. :evil With a 1/2-3/8 and 3/8-1/4 adapter, I can work on all my vehicles.

Just a word of caution, using the reducing adapters will generate "false" readings. It is technically not advised. That being said, I have tried to determine the variation, and it has not been significant in my findings.

:freaky

dmn0507 01-14-2013 12:19 PM

For "usual" maintenance you mostly need a low-range torque wrench (6-20 Nm), might be useful to have also one that covers up to 100Nm or so (head bolts, shock bolts, sprocket etc) but you can live without if you have some experience on wrenching (and if you don't plan to remove cyl. heads)

I'm not extremely picky about torque w., so a decent quality wrench (lets call it 'good deal') is okay, invest the extra money on sockets and spanners.

Schannulleke 01-14-2013 12:29 PM

Torque wrenches are very personal and depend on your budget. But you will need 2 wrenches to cover a large range of torques. Look at the torque list of the bike you have.

For regular maintenance, make sure you have the total range of 6 Nm to 90 Nm covered. (90 Nm for rear wheel).
Everything below 6 Nm is just handtight with a screwdriver without lever.

For more advanced maintenance the range should go up to 150 Nm (or 180 Nm with older models).

A torque wrench is typically less accurate at the lower end of its range, so try to avoid that. It's best that you chose the torque wrenches such that they have some overlap in their respective ranges.

mdfehrmann 01-14-2013 01:09 PM

I really like the "click stop" type.
I would buy the best you can afford, and if possible you can test it against a friends for consistency or better
yet find one that had recently been calibrated.

I also learned a trick from cjracer (craig) to paint mark your bolts after being torqued that way trail side you
can take a good guess at how tight by lining up the paint marks when there is no torque wrench available. This is very helpful on any bolts used in changing tubes from flat tires and chain adjustments, but I also mark everything else that gets torqued and just at a glance can see if something is working loose from vibration.

Matthew

Keith 01-14-2013 02:35 PM

I saw this last night while perusing. Might just work for you.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...=Torque+wrench

PMC 01-14-2013 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by el queso (Post 20481701)
I have two older (USA made) Craftsman “Micro-lock” torque wrenches; a 1/2” drive in foot-pounds and a 3/8” in inch-pounds. Both have a Newton-meter scale as well, so no conversions are needed. :evil With a 1/2-3/8 and 3/8-1/4 adapter, I can work on all my vehicles.


I have the same set-up
works awesome and you use them way more often than you'd think if you work on a bike or six.

Deepc 01-14-2013 06:40 PM

I'm looking into purchasing a torque driver. I found some on amazon that range from $50 to $200. I believe this is the ideal tool for all of the M5 screws on the engine case.

SauceSquatch 01-14-2013 09:34 PM

You'll need two IMO. I personally own three... At the very least you need a foot pounds with a good range and a small inch pounds. I like craftsman, I own a Husky as well and have been very happy with the quality.

mroddis 01-15-2013 10:03 AM

Thanks for all the advice! Great to have all your opinions to confirm what I had thought - that likely 2 tools are needed to service our wonderful machines.

Thanks too for the tip of one for sale in the classified.

Love this forum

Thanks all
Matthew.


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