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Old 09-14-2011, 10:27 AM   #226
simonpig OP
packin' heat
 
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Joined: Nov 2006
Location: NYC
Oddometer: 943
9/13/11 (Wednesday)
Total mileage: 308 miles
Overall average: 33 mph

Got up around 8 and walked over to feast on a breakfast of eggs, sausage and toast at the griddle house adjacent to the economy inn I was staying at.

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During breakfast a KTM 950 adventure with safari tanks and auxillary lights and full pannier setup with rack and bags pulls in. Didn't get a chance to talk to the guy since he was looking all intensely at his paper Nevada map and wasnt within earshot of me. He sat outside for as long as it took him to chart his course and was back on his bike and off. Wonder where he was going.

After my delicious breakfast, I ride over to the dealership to see if I could get service on my weeping forks. In daily life, one almost always needs a reservation, and I didn't have one and would have to wait at least 4 days for an opening.

Oh well, bought 2 standard front tubes, 1 rear manufactured by Kenda. They didn't have heavy duty ones. Also bought a number 5 race number to cut up and cover the extra hole on the rim from the tubliss rim lock. This would also double as rim tape to cover parts of the tubliss rim tape I cut that were bunching up.

Checked out at 10:30 and went to work underneath a covered parking spot. Was done at 12:00.

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As noted in a earlier post, the tubliss bladder had a manufacturing defect. The hole didn't look like anything that was caused by abrasion.

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Also did the business card fork seal trick. (It didn't work, but I'm going to have another go at it with the wipers pulled down)

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While finishing up, i was shooting the shit with Jarrod, son of the owner of the hotel who checked me in the previous evening and was omnipresent during my whole stay, he use to race motocross in Sacramento. He and the staff there were very helpful and accommodating asking me if I needed anything to make my maintenance easier.

After packing up, grabbed a gas station burrito and corndog and was off to Denio to catch the trail.

The road back to Denio Junction

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Picked up where I left off yesterday at 3:30 and it was back to hill climbs and double track.

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The first obstacle was several water crossing. Not feeling like drowning my bike I take off my shoes and socks and walk it. It's about a foot and a half and the bottom is clay. I go for it and make it. There are several more and I make those before moving to higher ground.

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Parts of those tracks are super rocky so standing up is mandatory if you don't want fatigue to set in. Wierd to say, I know, but if you're set up proper standing can be more comfortable than sitting. That and you don't absorbs all that roughness, plus you can go faster.

Nevada is a great state to ride in if you want to be with yourself in the sticks for long stretche of time on narrow double track. It seems like the most remote state I've ridden through.

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Again, today would see me ride into the sunset. Though not ideal when riding in remote places, the view is alway so much more glorious when the sun is going down. Strange colors illuminate the horizon and clouds and in this circumstance, strange is good.

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As I descend ond of the last strectches of elevation, there is enormous lowland, flooded with water (or is it a lake? It was so vast open and untouched -- did I say it already. Nevada is epic, y'all.

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After descending, it is around 7:30 and light is falling fast. I had come off the double track and onto open dirt and was feeling good about that, but then I enter it again. At this point, I need to turn on my Hid. The double track is over grown and claustrophobic and I'm doing my best not to cross rut. I'm also wary because I'm not sure what kind of surface I'm riding on. It looks chalky and fine and grey. I'm worried it might be silt. Almost go down a couple of times from the tire trying to climb a rut or the front plowing into softer surfaces.

After riding in the dark in the bushes for about half an hour, I hit an open gravel road and am relieved. The moon is behind me and almost full keeping me company as I blast into the night. There something I really enjoy about riding in moonlight. Feel like I can ride all night without worry. Probably irresponsible, but I cut my headlights off on an open stretch of gravel for about 10 seconds and could still see the road and my shadow cast from the moon behind me. I would turn around and see the trail of dust kicked up moonlit, too freaking cool to express in words.

My gps routes me to fort Bidwell California, the exact same route as the trail, so I know the roads are bigger. At around 9:15 I make it to ft bidwell.

Nothing there, so I look on the gps and the closest hotel was in cedarville 22 mile south. Rode down and no vacancies in both hotels. the ride down was for lack of a better word, sexy. The road hugged a gigantic body of water reflecting the moonlight.

Cedarville is eerily quiet as I fill up my tank. A stray black dog would walk up and down the street, at a good pace. He would meet up with with his other stray lighter colored buddy and they would walk back the other direction together noticing me but minding their own business.

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The next place to try was alturas, ca. Got there in about 25 minutes and it seems as though the whole town is booked. I should get into the hotel business. Even though the lady at the super 8 told me every single room in town was booked, I found s three bed room a couple of blocks away. Settled in, went the gas station and bought dinner and turned in for the evening.

simonpig screwed with this post 03-05-2013 at 08:35 AM
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