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Old 07-13-2012, 10:41 PM   #96
crofrog
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Annapolis Maryland
Oddometer: 1,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWall View Post
Not to be argumentative, but I am genuinely curious...when I took the MSF basic course, the instructor advocated either the "push harder or stand it up and brake straight ahead" point of view. His reasoning was that, if you haven't yet used up 100% of your available traction, then you can still turn tighter; if you are at 100% then you don't have any reserve for braking. I see two flaws with that viewpoint, however. First, I've dragged the pegs on my bike (not often, but I've done it), which tells me that ground clearance, rather than friction, is what limits my lean angle and turning radius. Second, Second, as you slow, your turning radius decreases, so it seems to me that braking gives you more options and more rom to turn and less severe penalties if you do try, ahem, inadvertent off-road excursions, shall we say?

Am I on the right track here, or did I miss Nick's point in the original post?
You're on the right track the msf program has fundamental flaws in there curriculum because they don't believe people are capable of learning "advanced" techniques or they don't trust there instructor cadre to be able to teach them not sure which, all I know is low standards produce low results.

Things to think about when you're on the front brake you're transferring weight to the front, if you put weight on the front end you get more traction. So while braking in the turn means you are asking more of the tire, the tire also has more to give you with the additional weight, this is why it's incredibly important to ramp the forces up, and not spike them up (gently apply the brakes don't grab them.) however this isn't infinite eventually the tire will give you no more, as long as you approach the tires limit gradually, nothing bad will happen, the front tire will start making noise and then push a bit, if you exceed it rapidly you low side.

Also as you're bike bleeds speed if you don't want to continue running a tighter line you can start to stand the bike up which gives you more and more power you can use for braking.

Chris

crofrog screwed with this post 07-14-2012 at 07:27 AM
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