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Old 11-21-2012, 09:29 AM   #11309
miguelito
Studly Adventurer
 
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Joined: Mar 2009
Location: San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
Oddometer: 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turkeycreek View Post
But I can count on 1 hand the number of American tourists murdered in Mexico in the last 3 years.

If you are that afraid, then don't come. A little fear can be good to keep one on their toes but people paralyzed by fear are a danger to themselves and to others. So if that's you, don't come. On the other hand, if you know yourself and you know how to be aware of your surroundings and pay attention then come down and ride. You will not regret it.

Saludos

Mostly agree TC, except for that "count the murders on one hand" part.

From a Huff Post/Lonely Planet blog:
What you don't get from most reports in the US [about Mexico] is statistical evidence that Americans are less likely to face violence in Mexico than at home, particularly when you zero in on Mexico's most popular travel destinations. For example, the gateway to Disney World, Orlando, saw 7.5 murders per 100,000 residents in 2010 according to the FBI; this is higher than Cancun or Puerto Vallarta, with rates of 1.83 and 5.9 respectively, per a Stanford University report (see data visualization here, summarized on this chart, page 21). Yet in March, the Texas Department of Public Safety advised against "spring break" travel anywhere in Mexico, a country the size of the UK, France, Germany, Spain and Italy combined. Never mind that popular destinations like the Bahamas, Belize and Jamaica have far higher homicide rates (36, 42 and 52 per 100,000). Why the singular focus?
1. Mexico may be more dangerous than the US overall, but not for Americans.
According to FBI crime statistics, 4.8 Americans per 100,000 were murdered in the US in 2010. The US State Department reports that 120 Americans of the 5.7 million who visited Mexico last year were murdered, which is a rate of 2.1 of 100,000 visitors. Regardless of whether they were or weren't connected to drug trafficking, which is often not clear, it's less than half the US national rate.
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