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Old 02-07-2013, 01:43 PM   #321
sloweddy
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[QUOTE=thistle66;20671431]
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloweddy View Post


Klay's use of effect, as a verb, is correct.


ef·fect
/iˈfekt/
Noun
A change that is a result or consequence of an action or other cause.
Verb
Cause (something) to happen; bring about.
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After reading some English usage guides I can see why effect might be used in this case...

Usually affect is a verb & effect is a noun - but there are rare exceptions...


http://web.ku.edu/~edit/affect.html

"
“Effect” as a verb. (Not common, but acceptable in rare cases.) To produce a result; to cause something to occur; to bring about an outcome. Example: Smith said the cutbacks were designed to effect basic economies for the company. "

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com...us-effect.aspx

"Rare Uses of Affect and Effect -So what about those rare meanings that don't follow the rules I just gave you? Well, affect can be used as a noun when you're talking about psychology--it means the mood that someone appears to have. For example, "She displayed a happy affect." Psychologists find it useful because they know that you can never really understand what someone else is feeling. You can only know how they appear to be feeling."

And, effect can be used as a verb that essentially means "to bring about," or "to accomplish." For example, you could say, "Aardvark hoped to effect change within the burrow."



http://www.grammar-monster.com/easil...ect_effect.htm

"There is a verb 'to effect'. It is quite rare, but useful in business writing. It means 'to bring into being'.
Read more at http://www.grammar-monster.com/easil...TPhosfIsjt6.99
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sloweddy screwed with this post 02-07-2013 at 01:52 PM
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