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Old 07-31-2007, 12:25 PM   #156
2 Wheels
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Joined: Jul 2006
Location: San Diego, CA
Oddometer: 174
Erendira, Baja California Part 2

PART 2 OF ROUTE - SANTO TOMAS TO LA CALAVERA


LEAVING PAVEMENT IN SANTO TOMAS

At Santo Tomas, we leave the main highway and take the dirt road for La Calavera on the coast.

SANTO TOMAS


OVERLOOKING SANTO TOMAS

After riding through town, we stopped to take a photo of the Santo Tomas Valley

ROAD TO LA CALAVERA

Some years, the Baja races follow the same route we're taking. At first, the road is like any other dirt road. It's washboarded and doesn't have as much traction as pavement, but it's easy to ride.

ROAD TO LA CALAVERA

Mostly we see chaparral on either side of the road.

A FARM ALONGSIDE THE ROAD

Although the road is lined with chaparral for the most part, we see the occasional farm like this one.

After a while, we get to what I guess is part of the Baja race course. It's rocky, but the rocks are either small enough for a motorcycle's wheels to roll right over or far enough apart to go around. There are whoops everywhere. All the corners have berms, but they also have huge bumps right before and after.

For those outside the world of motorcycling who don't know what whoops are, I found this definition on the internet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motorcycle-Glossary.com
Also known as whoop-de-doos. A section of track with a row of dirt mounds or moguls. Whoops are one of the most difficult obstacles on a Supercross track, as timing, throttle control and body positioning are crucial. Whoops are usually good places for fast riders to pass.
I didn't get any pictures of the whoops on the trail - I was too busy hanging on - so here are some pictures I found on the internet to give you the idea.

THESE ARE SOME SMALL WHOOPS.


SOME BIGGER WHOOPS ON A TRACK.



The Baja race course isn't difficult to ride, but it's difficult to ride fast. I don't know how to ride whoops. I think the good riders jump them and skip every other one or skim across the top and avoid the deep part in between them, but that's beyond my ability so I just go slow keeping both wheels on the ground most of the time. Jumping them could be dangerous because every now and then there's a big rock in the low ground between whoops that could make you crash if you hit it. When you're in a trough, you can't see the trough in front of you. I have a newfound respect for Baja racers after riding that section of road.

By the end of the ride, I've bottomed the suspension on my little trail bike more times in one day than in all the rest of the time I've owned it.

MORNING COASTAL FOG

This is a DR200 thread, isn't it? That's my little DR about a half mile from the Pacific Ocean. The morning coastal fog beyond the next hill tells me we're almost at the beach.

OVERLOOKING LA CALAVERA FISHING CAMP

Joaquin and husky4me appreciating the view of La Calavera.

LA CALAVERA

This is what Joaquin and husky4me are looking at in the previous photo.

TAKING A PICTURE THROUGH THE MORNING FOG


CLOSE UP VIEW OF LA CALAVERA


ON OUR WAY AGAIN
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