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Old 03-28-2005, 09:24 PM   #1
wpbarlow OP
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Worst motorcycle ever!



Yeah, what he said!


So a couple of friends and I were sitting at the bar tonight talking bikes and we got on the topic of bikes that were not big sellers when they came out but over time have become somewhat desireable to cult-like in following. This is a subject near to my heart as I've had (and have) more than one of these kinds of bikes

So we went through a reasonably common litany of them: i.e., Honda (seemed like a lot of Hondas fit this description) Hawk, TransAlp, Pacific Coast, CB1, CBX, Yamaha GTS1000, SRX6, TDM850, Suzuki Rotary, etc..

We then went on to bikes that didn't sell well then and still don't: Yamaha Vision, Seca, and XV920 (one on ebay right now!) Suzuki VX800, etc.

But sooner or later we got to the real issue; what was the worst modern (post 1965) bike ever sold? Several strong candidates- a lot depends on what you mean by "worst". Lots of potential for worst looking (late 60's MV Agusta GT, couple of 80's Italian cruisers, Suzuki Rotary, BMW crusiers, etc.); couple that were clear financial disasters (various Indian reincarnations, Excelsior, Bimota V-Due).

In the end, I came up with the Yamaha TX750. It had the "advantage" of being a major disaster from a major manufacturer- not because it did anything so terribly wrong or was too radical an approach or too weird looking, but just because it totally failed to capture the imagination of hardly anyone.



Cycle had this to say...
An extended trip leaves the rider with a multitude of impressions of where he's been, and no impressions whatsoever of what he's been there on. It's not fast, not slow, neither handy nor awkward, visually between striking and overcooked, neither expensive enough to drop your jaw nor cheap enough to be disposable. It is rational, reliable, quiet [85 dB(A)], elaborate, and entirely serviceable; the 1973 Yamaha TX750 is the Chevrolet Biscayne of big-bore motorcycling. It gives you nothing to put up with--and no reason for doing so if it did.

My dirty little secret of the time was that I really liked the way it looked and thought the vibration solution was pretty elegant and advanced for the time (counter-balancers).

My 2nd choice was the equally star crossed TX500; which was a bike that I really liked- first modern production 8 valve twin iirc.

Both bikes may have lasted 2 years, and were unmitigated disasters for Yamaha.

There was another bike that was under consideration but, despite being heavily advertised, I don't know that it ever reached production: the 1970ish BSA Fury/Triumph Bandit- a a modern DOHC twin dual sport- the development of which went a long way towards putting BSA (who owned Triumph at the time iirc) out of business. Maybe it should get the award just for that. Certainly worth a picture



You have any other candidates?
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Old 03-28-2005, 09:35 PM   #2
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Are you talking USA? couple of bikes mentioned are still in production overseas (transalp, pacific coast, vx800) Barb
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Old 03-28-2005, 10:01 PM   #3
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Yamaha had a shafty 850 that was a smoldering POS from the same vintage. Can't remember what it was called but it didn't hold up well and was pretty unremarkable. Sold in the mid 70's

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Old 03-29-2005, 03:36 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Gerg
Yamaha had a shafty 850 that was a smoldering POS from the same vintage. Can't remember what it was called but it didn't hold up well and was pretty unremarkable. Sold in the mid 70's

Gerg
The XS 850 here in Australia, the best thing about it was the headlight it was about 10" dia. The first and only m/c I have had with a great stock light .
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Old 03-29-2005, 04:19 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by mitch
The XS 850 here in Australia, the best thing about it was the headlight it was about 10" dia. The first and only m/c I have had with a great stock light .
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
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Old 03-29-2005, 05:56 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by RT jim
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
After thinking I think the 900 was a Kaw.
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Old 03-29-2005, 06:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RT jim
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
Yep. The CB900C circa 1982 or so.

Honda sold, to my knowledge, two automatic variants in the USA. The CB750A and the CM400A. I think they both used a two speed trans and the "clutch" lever on the left bar was a parking brake.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:26 AM   #8
Tuna Helper
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Originally Posted by RT jim View Post
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
Honda had an automatic 750 around then.
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Old 02-07-2013, 02:51 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by RT jim View Post
How about the Hondamatic (i think 450cc) Knew someone who bought one for wife.And didn't Honda build a 900 with high and low range transmission back around 75
Yes, the CB900 Custom. I had one it was pretty nice. Shaft drive, air suspension, dual range transmission. Pretty comfortable to ride all day.

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Old 03-29-2005, 05:54 AM   #10
wpbarlow OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerg
Yamaha had a shafty 850 that was a smoldering POS from the same vintage. Can't remember what it was called but it didn't hold up well and was pretty unremarkable. Sold in the mid 70's
Gerg
Interesting comment. My recollection of that bike was that it was rather well received and a very viable alternative to the BMWs of the time. Only knew a couple of people who had them, but they had nothing but praise for them.
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Old 03-29-2005, 06:01 AM   #11
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Hands down, my 1956 Triumph cub !!! It was my first bike. I bought it in 1968 had it 6 months ran a total of 10 minutes!!!!!!!
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Old 03-29-2005, 06:14 AM   #12
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the Chevrolet Biscayne of big-bore motorcycling.
that line had me laughing so hard I almost spit coffee all over my keyboard!
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Old 04-15-2008, 11:58 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by prestaino
Hands down, my 1956 Triumph cub !!! It was my first bike. I bought it in 1968 had it 6 months ran a total of 10 minutes!!!!!!!

I've got a better one than that. BSA C-15
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Old 03-29-2005, 05:55 AM   #14
wpbarlow OP
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Originally Posted by BARB
Are you talking USA? couple of bikes mentioned are still in production overseas (transalp, pacific coast, vx800) Barb
Yes, it was a decidedly US perspective. But that makes me wonder- were there bikes that were successful here in the US that were turds everywhere else?
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:02 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by wpbarlow View Post
Yes, it was a decidedly US perspective. But that makes me wonder- were there bikes that were successful here in the US that were turds everywhere else?
Any Harley I would have thought. Although they do sell a few in many countries, it is mainly the image, not the machine. They may have a place on US highways, but outside that environment they seem to have little going for them..... Mind you the same could be said for a few other heavyweights, such as the Gold Wing.

In most of the rest of the world more nimble machines are a much better proposition.

In England I had a Honda CB 250 RS on which I explored much of the British Isles, and parts of Central Europe. A guy who used to drop by at the pub I lived in had a well tarted up Harley, on which his annual milage was less than I would do in one July (my usual touring month, post sheep shearing and prior to harvest).

But then it is different strokes for different folks. He got a kick out of his over priced ornament, while I got my jollies out of a bike that cost me 500, and took me thousands of miles over several years..... before it was stolen.
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