ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-10-2012, 07:56 AM   #1
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
DIY LED XR650L blinkers and brake light

So here's a copy of what I posted in the XR650L forum, where someone suggested I start my own thread re: this build. I can't guarantee that I'll be finishing this up anytime real soon, as other home projects are bound to get in the way, so consider this a work in progress.

Some links I consider useful and relevant:

Constant Current power supply from Instructables
Avago Red LED's from Mouser


This project started due to a need to have a rear facing red foglight on my car. I used the bumper reflector, and LED's from Mouser. Here's a shot gluing it back together after assembly. For some reason, my camera gave it an orange/yellow tint vs the red that my eye sees. You can see the constant current source in the upper left corner, from Instructables, adjusted to match the LED's I chose. Total power draw, 12W. Light output, 300 lumens. I have the option to push 700mA instead, which would bump me up to 24W draw, and eyeball searing amount of light. Those little f'ers are bright. My blind spots lasted about 5 minutes with them at full power.



Edit: This picture was taken only driving 151mA through the LED's of their 700mA capacity.

On to the motorbike stuff.

I've done a bit of messing around so far, and determined that 3 of these each front and back will approximately match the brightness of the factory blinkers! I'd plan to push them at 1/2-3/4 power, which would run me 6-9W each blinker (not in red, of course.) By comparison, the factory blinkers are 23W each.

I want to do the brake light as well, with 12 LED's. When not braking, they'll pull 2W to put out about the amount of light the factory "TV set" does as a taillight. Tap the brake, and they go to full brightness (1100+ lumens, equal to a 70W incandescent light bulb according to Wikipedia - chart near bottom) while drawing a mere 16.8W.

Then there's the headlight, but I haven't picked out all the stuff for it yet. I know I'm targeting 3300 lumens low beam, 5000+ high beam in the patterns linked. If high beam accidentally throws too far, oh well. Hehe. I'm shooting for 4500+/- degrees Kelvin for low beam, 5000 K high beam for ideal visibility and natural color rendering. I expect the cost to be right around $150-200 in parts based on preliminary planning, and provide me with a very close to optimal headlight pattern that will not annoy oncoming traffic, drawing a target of 30W low, 50W high.

EDIT, 03 June 2014 - I've added the following link to a PDF I printed from my Mouser project page this afternoon. If you'd like to make this LED taillight, almost everything you need is in this link. Just add some kind of breadboard from RadioShack, etc and some aluminum bar, bolts, and grommets from your local hardware store.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/94352780/advrider/XRL_taillight.pdf

Also, here's the link for the bayonet socket I used:

http://www.superbrightleds.com/morei...-base/707/772/

pngaudioguy screwed with this post 06-03-2014 at 01:15 PM Reason: Modify Title
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 08:07 AM   #2
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost_Mutant View Post
Thanks for posting that Instructables link. I'm building my own dual sport kit for my second XR and I was planning on using some more "luxeon" LEDs again. After seeing this info, I'm reconsidering my strategy

My present LEDs on my already dual sported XR are 3 watt turn, and 5 watt brake/tail. The 3 watt/1156 are adequate in the daytime. But the 5 watt brake light is plenty bright and I would say about equal to the original incandescent.

The first set of regular type LEDs I bought were not bright enough for daytime use in my opinion. So the luxeon types are worth the extra $$ to be sure other drivers see my signals. Only problem I had with the "cheap" luxeon is that vibration eventually separated the heat sink from the housing, breaking two of my lights. They were put together with some kind of super glue that failed. I ended up using some JB weld on my still working lights to prevent the heat sink/housing separation. Now I may be able to save the broken ones by using the simple circuit featured in the Instructable.

Speaking of heat sinks, the LEDs you linked to at Mouser look similar to the luxeon that I have; but are you going to heat sink the LEDs somehow? I didn't see any extra heat sinking in the fog light photo.

I'd suggest you post a separate thread on your work and then announcing the link here. Probably be other riders who would want to know this info.
Quoted to copy relevant info from XRL thread to here.

You're welcome for the link. The parts to build your own constant current supply are only a few dollars, and can be very easily customized to a particular need using his provided formulas. This circuit would readily drive the Luxeons as well.

Heat sinks - definitely a must for full power operation. After much research, it seems that standard JB Weld is thermally but not electrically conductive (at least not enough to cause shorting, etc). I can confirm that it does not transfer enough electricity to light an LED, as I accidentally experimented with that during this build... Probably a great option for attaching to heatsinks in a pinch, though I suggest that Arctic Alumina is a better epoxy for that application long term, being ceramic based and designed for heat transfer.

The Avago LED's are very similar to Luxeons, being slightly more expensive and brighter than Luxeon I, while being only slightly dimmer and much less expensive than Luxeon III. Also, their peak light output requires only 700mA vs 1400mA for the Luxeon III. In the previous picture, I'm running them at 151mA. Going over the spec sheet, I don't anticipate a need for much heatsinking under those conditions. I have a thin aluminum plate JB'd to the plastic, then the LED's JB'd to that.

Word of caution about the Avago LED's - the red does not seem to be available with an electrically isolated slug, so if you mount directly to a metal surface, all the anodes will be linked resulting in a fixed 100% parallel configuration. Be very cautious about forward voltage!


My LED's for the bike however, will have appropriate heatsinks, and I'll take more pictures along the way. Naturally, the brake will need the best heatsink, as it will be an always on (albeit at low power) application. They put off a nice glow at 20 mA.

pngaudioguy screwed with this post 02-10-2012 at 08:08 AM Reason: formatting
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 09:26 AM   #3
Ghost_Mutant
looking for bionics
 
Ghost_Mutant's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: border of granite & flats
Oddometer: 701
Subscribed.

I would not have switched to LEDs if I had the juice to spare. My stock stator puts out something like 75 Watts. The incandescent lights that came with the old baja designs dual sport kit did drain the tiny battery during idle conditions, like stopped in rush hour traffic with the brake light on. Switching to LEDs made a big difference. I should upgrade my stator but I'll have to deal with grommet sealing issues since there isn't an exact fit for my XR5.

Downside of my plug in 1156/57 Luxeons are:

1) expensive
2) heavy
3) fragile

Seeing two of these expensive lights fail due to vibration was a big downer. The heat sinks on these are big and heavy items. I had one turn signal oriented out (pointing out) instead of the normal Honda pointed back. Previous owner had replaced a broken turn signal with a Suzuki style. Its obvious that the vibrations combined with the orientation of the bulb conspired together to break that turn signal. I've since replaced that turn signal with a Honda style.

The other broken light was the tail/brake light. It initially failed when I tried to install it. The glue holding the heat sink on was that weak. I didn't do a good enough job fixing it and it failed a second time and I then had to buy a new one. The new one was a different design and looked more robust, but I still added some JB weld to be sure it stays together.

I'm glad I haven't bought any more of these LED bulb replacements. With your info here, I'll be pricing components to see if there is any money to be saved building my own. I might change my turn signal style if I can figure out how to properly mount the Avagos.

Hadn't thought about replacing the headlight. Definitely let us know how that works out!
Ghost_Mutant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 09:50 AM   #4
beechum1
Beastly Adventurer
 
beechum1's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Herlong, CA. Look it up, I'll wait.
Oddometer: 7,166
What type of controller, and how to program, to get flash patterns?
__________________
Rally Moto Kit /// Vendor Thread
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dread Pendragon View Post
Mention to HogWild which way the wind is blowing where you're at, wait 20 minutes, and he'll post a picture of the intersection your at and a Google Earth route of how to get there.
beechum1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 12:28 PM   #5
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
The circuit I'm using in these is just an electrical current control. There's no flash patterns or anything. The blinkers will use an electronic flasher relay replacement for the stock one since with the low power draw they'd just be on, not blink otherwise. The brake light will use my foot/hand as the flasher.

I'm not convinced that the DIY method will necessarily be any cheaper than buying a pre-made unit. However, I'll know that I've used good components, and that the assembly is good. Plus it's fun to do.
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 12:36 PM   #6
AtlantaViking
Studly Adventurer
 
AtlantaViking's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Hotlanta
Oddometer: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by pngaudioguy View Post
I...'m not convinced that the DIY method will necessarily be any cheaper than buying a pre-made unit. However, I'll know that I've used good components, and that the assembly is good. Plus it's fun to do.
+1. Idle hands are the devils workshop! Have fun - sounds like a cool project
__________________
I'm here to chew bubblegum and kick ass....and I'm all out of bubble gum

06 Suzi DL1K
99 Suzi DR350SE
AtlantaViking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 02:16 PM   #7
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
I've been a little side-tracked finishing up the fog lights for the cars and working on the basement so we can rent out the house when we move, but I've managed to put together this schematic of how I intend to wire the brake light up. I used the open source TinyCad from sourceforge. Pretty cool little program.

The white LED's are because many states require illumination on the license plate, and obviously red LED's won't provide that. I don't want to attract the wrong kind of attention with this. The schottky diode is to have minimal voltage loss on my primary power source, while preventing the high current for the red LED's from kicking back into the low power white LED's.

Most of the circuit looks very much like the one from the constant current power source linked in the first post, but you'll note that I've added an additional NFET and resistor. When power is applied to the brake signal wire, current will flow through this transistor dropping a second resistor in parallel with the first. This will alter the current set point of the system, making the LED's brighten dramatically. They're rated for 700mA maximum DC current to provide 94lm of output.

10 ohm for taillight = 50mA of current through red LED's ~7.5lm each, 90lm total
.758 ohm for brake = 660mA of current through red LED's ~85lm each, 1020lm total

Reminder - in the picture above they're being driven at 150mA, and there are only 6 of them vs 12...


Updated diagram:
Changed R4 to 39 ohm, after measuring a constant 13.9 volts on taillight pin to keep those 4 LED's happy at 30mA.
Added R5 to catch any potential current spikes on application of brakes.
Added R6 to drain charge from Q3 to allow channel to close on brake release.

Added diagram on right:
Mostly just a copy from the instructable, with values customized for my application. ~650mA to 5 LED's for the turn signals.

I needed a wire connector for the switch harness on my wife's car, so had to place an order from Mouser anyway. To save on shipping costs, it only made sense to buy the parts for this at the same time... I'll post up if I find an excuse to put it together this spring before we move!

pngaudioguy screwed with this post 03-10-2012 at 05:36 PM Reason: updated diagrams and part values
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 02:37 PM   #8
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Parts came in! Looking at the forecast, I'm planning to ride to work on Tuesday, and "accidentally" take the rear light apart to bring some parts in to measure when I get home. I put in quite a few hours on the house this weekend, so might get a pass for fiddling with the bike weeknights this week.

pngaudioguy screwed with this post 03-10-2012 at 02:00 PM Reason: removed picture of car, now that pictures of brakelight below
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 09:32 AM   #9
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Found a couple minutes this morning when wife wasn't looking to disappear into the basement. I've decided to use the factory "TV" to mount my LED's. After a bit of turning parts this way and that, and contemplating, here's my started assembly.

Standard 3/4" by 1/8" aluminum bar available at most home improvement warehouses for cheap, grommets from a packet of 8 or so at Autozone, also fairly cheap.


Carefully drilled and marked holes to get heatsink to line up nicely.


That's about as far as I'll be able to get today. Afternoon is booked up. Yes, the red lid fits over neatly with zero modification. I had to Dremel the shield just a little to get my bar to clear. I ordered empty bayonet sockets from superbrightleds.com to wire to my LED's so that if for some reason this whole project is an epic fail, I can just pop the normal bulb back in and go for a ride.
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2012, 05:40 PM   #10
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Been working over lunch at work

Have spent the lunch break this week working on my brake light. Here's my progress so far.

The LED's, ready to fasten to the heat sink, and everything all wired up.


A shot of the other side of the wiring - the component locations will make a lot more sense when it's attached to the heatsink, which I constantly held it up against as I went.


Next two shots are with the camera locked on ISO, F-stop, and shutter settings. First up, in taillight mode.


And brake mode:
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2012, 06:55 PM   #11
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Argh - why is USPS so SLOW! Project on hold until they deliver the arctic alumina. All the wiring is done, I just need that epoxy to get the LED's attached to the heatsinks without shorting anything out. Still hoping that our mail man will bring them tomorrow, maybe. I've updated the first post, and the post halfway down the first page with schematics to current status.
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2012, 05:05 PM   #12
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Brake light finished, blinkers started

Had a random day off today, so of course I attacked the brake light. Here's finished pictures.

Used the weight of the heatsink to hold all the LED's against it while the thermal epoxy set up - 5 minutes.


Flipped it over, here's the topside.


Mounted on the bike.


Comparison in full afternoon sunlight with the camera at about 3 feet.
Camera is in manual mode with locked ISO, f-stop, shutter, and white balance.
Top row is factory bulb, bottom row LED. Taillight on left, Brake on right.


Comparison at dusk from about 30 feet away. Same orientation as above.
I left the license plate unblurred (I know, a travesty), because I find it amazing how constant the light on the plate is with the new setup regardless whether braking or not.


A little darker out, off-axis at about 10 feet, just the LED this time because I was tired of changing the bulb.


So that's the brake light. I can honestly say that it looks every bit as bright as the stock bulb across all the necessary viewing angles to provide safety, and even illuminates the plate better than the stock bulb using the values in the updated current supply on the left in post #7. From car driver viewing height, the LED's are just on the edge of painful to look at. Perfect, if you ask me.

Total power draw? 50mA as taillight, 580mA as brake which equates to ~0.75/8W as compared to 8/27W for the factory brake bulb.

Here's a quick shot of where I'm going with the blinkers, using amber instead of red LED's, of course.


I'd originally hoped to use just one constant current supply as shown on the right in post #7 above, but after analyzing the wiring schematic of the bike, decided that I wasn't content with the amount of control that would give over the actual current through the LED's with the amount of other stuff sharing that green wire, and have ordered parts to make 3 more, so these will truly be a plug and play replacement for the factory bulb. Once those arrive, I should be able to get the electronic relay popped on, and have these done in another day or so.

The headlight? That's a back burner pipe-dream at this point.
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 09:30 AM   #13
Ghost_Mutant
looking for bionics
 
Ghost_Mutant's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: border of granite & flats
Oddometer: 701
Looking good.

I hope those turn signals work out, but I'm having trouble seeing how you are going to install them. Will they twist into the socket with that large piece of wood and heatsink?
Ghost_Mutant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 02:55 PM   #14
pngaudioguy OP
Just...one...more...
 
pngaudioguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Belgium
Oddometer: 437
Thanks for asking. I did end up having to Dremel just a little bit off the corner of the wood to get them to twist correctly. I'd test fit them flat, but the diagonal was just a little longer than the straight line, of course.

Final electrical test has a draw of between .66 and .68A depending on the unit. At a voltage of 13.8 (at blinker socket with engine running), that comes out to 9.3 watts. Factory blinkers are 23 watts, so each side will now draw 18W vs 46W originally, and no filament to break.

Finished blinkers.


Installed on the bike.


Test, cover off.


Cover back on.


Directly from the side.


LED left, bulb right. Not quite as bright, but perfectly adequate.
pngaudioguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2012, 08:12 PM   #15
KyoXR
Clouds, Snow, Rain
 
KyoXR's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: CA
Oddometer: 619
keep up the good work, we need more people like you doing this sort of thing.
__________________
2007 XR650L,
Looking to acquire a stock XRL choke plunger.
The multi-quote function is your friend.
KyoXR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014