ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Battle scooters
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-17-2012, 07:53 PM   #1
DandyDoug OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lewisville, NC
Oddometer: 378
Motorcycle to Maxi ?

I currently ride a 1985 BMW R80 and am considering buying a Maxi scooter but have some doubts about it being suitable for me.
I live in central NC. and ride the twisty bits a lot.
Today's run was three states and 300 miles of some really tight mountain roads. Aside from the heat whipping me, I am flat worn out from shifting , and throwing the bikes weight around.
I'm 68 and considered to be a very smooth rider ( been doing it a long time)
I still tour a bit , not as much as in the past, comfort is a big factor in my decision process.


A Burgman is high on my interest list along with maybe the BMW C650GT if they ever get here.

Who can shed some light on the usability of a Maxi in the tight twisty bits ?

How does the engine braking ( off throttle ) effect the machine ?

What about the cornering clearance ?
( all that plastic looks expensive if it gets scuffed up)
DandyDoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 08:18 PM   #2
tastroman
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Collinsville Va
Oddometer: 1,595
Most any vehicle ridden at it's limits can bring a smile to your face. I think most scooters will reach their limits before your current BMW but they won't keep you from having a good time at a slightly slower pace. There is some getting use to the lack of engine braking on downhills, especially on gravel. You will find that proper entry speed achieved by pre corner braking is the key to keeping things smooth.

You sound like you have sporting intentions so you might want to add one of the sportier scooters, the Yamaha T-Max to your list. I've also read that the KYMCO GTI 300 can achieve decent lean angles.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------
The world would be a better place if there were fewer people who felt like they needed to teach other people a lesson.
2007 Daelim S-2 250
2009 Buell Ulysses XB12XT
tastroman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 11:12 AM   #3
cdwise
Studly Adventurer
 
cdwise's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: Houston, TX/Breckenridge, CO
Oddometer: 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by tastroman View Post
Most any vehicle ridden at it's limits can bring a smile to your face. I think most scooters will reach their limits before your current BMW but they won't keep you from having a good time at a slightly slower pace. There is some getting use to the lack of engine braking on downhills, especially on gravel. You will find that proper entry speed achieved by pre corner braking is the key to keeping things smooth.

You sound like you have sporting intentions so you might want to add one of the sportier scooters, the Yamaha T-Max to your list. I've also read that the KYMCO GTI 300 can achieve decent lean angles.
FWIW, the new BV 350 has engine braking with its new wet clutch. That has been one of the points made by pretty much everyone who has gotten one. Those coming from scooters with little or no engine braking have found a need to adjust their riding. Those with more of a motorcycle background are quite happy with it.

Personally, I prefer the more upright seating position of the BV and other larger traditionally styled scooters over that of the maxiscoot Burgman, Majesty, Kymcos, the new BWM or Aprilia SRV 850 (also coming to the US later this year and on the Aprilia USA website already.)

Of all the scoots we've owned the Aprilia Scarabeo 500 is my #1 favorite for touring and riding the twisties. I've put thousands of miles on it riding the Twisted Sisters in Texas with my brother on his BMW and friends on various other big bikes (up to and including 1750cc bikes) and had no problems keeping up. Sure they could smoke me on a long straight road but who cares I can cruise all day at 85-88 mphs as I did crossing US 50 in Nevada or pop up around 100mph to pass if I need to do so (not that I've ever do such a thing:-) )

The Scarabeo seat is much more comfortable than the BV to me and the suspension feels a bit better but I've done 3,700-4,400 mile trips on both. I found the Burgman 400 to be much less comfortable after a 1,200 mile trip than either of the more upright ones on trips in excess for 3,000 miles. Others find the Burgmans more comfortable but if the cruiser position bothers you then I suspect you'd be better off with one of the more upright big wheel scoots. In town I prefer the Vespa GTS 250-300 but its 12" wheels may not suit you.

FWIW, if you aren't in California or New York you can remove the evap canister and gain a fair bit of storage room. I believe the new BV 350 has room for a full face and a 3/4 helmet under the seat if you remove the evap.

cdwise screwed with this post 07-18-2012 at 11:47 AM Reason: Added more info on BV 350.
cdwise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 01:23 PM   #4
OBIWAN
Gnarly Adventurer
 
OBIWAN's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Location: OK, USA
Oddometer: 137
Keep BMW until ...

IMO, which ever scoot you get, keep your BMW until you just don’t ride it any more. Keep in mind that some of the scoots have the engine mounted to the rear swing arm and some have the engine mounted to the frame. For example I believe the Burgman 400 has the swing arm mounted engine and the Burgman 650 has a frame mounted engine. I don’t owner either one but I would think this would have some effect on ride quality and handling.
__________________
__________________________________________________ _________
Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though
checked by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy
nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither
victory nor defeat. ------Theodore Roosevelt.
OBIWAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 09:02 PM   #5
klaviator
Beastly Adventurer
 
klaviator's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Oddometer: 5,795
The riding position of most maxi scooters is more like a cruiser than the upright position of your BMW. You need to try it to see if it is comfortable for you.

The Burgman 650 is quite a bit heavier than your BMW.

Scooters don't have folding footpegs to warn you when you are running out of cornering clearance.

Personally, I prefer the smaller, lighter, more upright scooters. I recently did a 2100 mile, 8 state trip on my Aprilia Sport City 250. It was not too small, it was comfortable and it does great on twisty roads. I do a lot of my riding in the mountains of N. GA, WNC, and E. TN. Here's the link to my last ride report: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=803404

If you think a small scooter is too slow, check this out: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=694932

My recommendation would be to look at the Kymco GT300I and the new Piaggio BV350 if you want something to that will work well on twisty roads. If you are happy with the lounge chair riding position of the Maxi's then the T max would likely be your best choice.
__________________
I ride, Therefore I Am.



klaviator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2012, 11:21 PM   #6
samc
just me.....
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Waikoloa, HI
Oddometer: 56
Add Burgman 400 and silver wing to your list of possibles. The burgman 400 has about the same performance envelope as a HD 883 sportster, but friendlier ergos and lots of storage. And better brakes, and way less vibration than the old solid mount sporties . The S'wing is slightly sportier, at least to me. There is a learning curve to scooters after transitioning from a bike, I'm finding, but the big scoot is certainly very capable.

You asked about engine braking; it's not a significant factor on the 400, but the more complex 650 has quite a bit, since it has a much fancier transmission that forces a "downshift" of sorts. The 400 and the S'wing have CVTs, which feel more like coasting when the throttle is backed off. I believe the big Kymco and Piaggio are also CVT. note that the CVT can be effectively re programmed by changing slider weights, an easy job, to alter power delivery. you're just gonna have to ride one. It's certainly an eye opener

samc screwed with this post 07-17-2012 at 11:28 PM
samc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 05:06 AM   #7
DandyDoug OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lewisville, NC
Oddometer: 378
From the responses so far it sounds like i need to find a way to do some fairly long test rides, if that's even remotely possible !

I stopped riding cruisers because the position hurt my low back .

The small wheels on the lesser sized scooters concern me .
If they are anything like the Lambretta's & Vespa's of old that would make them very spooky handling wise.

I do still ride fairly sporty in my old age, but have slowed down a lot in the last few years. Amazing at what you see when you knock off a few miles an hour and start to smell the flowers.
DandyDoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 05:37 AM   #8
klaviator
Beastly Adventurer
 
klaviator's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Oddometer: 5,795
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandyDoug View Post
From the responses so far it sounds like i need to find a way to do some fairly long test rides, if that's even remotely possible !

I stopped riding cruisers because the position hurt my low back .

The small wheels on the lesser sized scooters concern me .
If they are anything like the Lambretta's & Vespa's of old that would make them very spooky handling wise.

I do still ride fairly sporty in my old age, but have slowed down a lot in the last few years. Amazing at what you see when you knock off a few miles an hour and start to smell the flowers.
If the cruiser riding position hurts your back, then the maxi scoots may do the same. Both my Kymco and Aprilia dealers let me ride the scooters before buying them. I recently stopped by a local Vespa/Piaggio/Sym/Genuine dealer and was looking at the new BV350. The sales lady asked me if I wanted to take it for a spin. She didn't have to twist my arm. If I was looking for a new scooter right now the BV350 would be at the top of my list.

My experience is that Japanese bike dealers generally don't allow test rides except for used bikes while European bike dealers generally do.

As for wheel sizes, my Aprilia has 15" wheels. The BV350 has 14"rear/16" front. The Kymco GT300I has 16" wheels. The Japanese Maxi Scooters have slightly smaller size wheels. Bigger scooters don't always have bigger wheels. There are some 150cc scooters with 16 inch wheels.

My Kymco Super 8 150 has 14" wheels and handles great except that it has limited cornering clearance.

One thing that I have found with my scooters is that it is so easy to stop and get off & on, that I do stop more often to check stuff out or take pictures.
__________________
I ride, Therefore I Am.



klaviator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 06:29 AM   #9
tastroman
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Collinsville Va
Oddometer: 1,595
Something else to consider is weather the benefit of a flat floor means anything to you. I find a flat floor great for hauling things and will probably never own another scooter without one but I ride a scooter for more utilitarian purposes as opposed to sporting pleasure.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------
The world would be a better place if there were fewer people who felt like they needed to teach other people a lesson.
2007 Daelim S-2 250
2009 Buell Ulysses XB12XT
tastroman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 06:52 AM   #10
DandyDoug OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lewisville, NC
Oddometer: 378
I realize that as with all things " it's a compromise"

I am simple trying to find a way to keep riding as i get older. Some of the guys i ride with on a regular basis are a lot older than me and we all have the miriad of aging problems. They all ride bigger , faster and much heavier motorcycles than me. Frankly, they tend to ride faster than I prefer also.
I have always preferred something around 800cc, but have owned a Goldwing, an ST1300, a Road King, along with a bunch of others over the years.

I'll bet that any of the Maxi's/Scooters mentioned by the respondents to my questions will be ok . I just am not in a financial position to make a bad choice and then lose a ton selling it.
So in order of my priorities :
1. Comfort
2. Versatility/handling
3. Fuel economy
4. Weather protection
5. Dealer network/spares availability
6. and probably a few others that will come to mind

I appreciate all the responses.
Doug
DandyDoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2012, 11:59 PM   #11
Phipsd
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: West coast British Columbia
Oddometer: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandyDoug View Post
From the responses so far it sounds like i need to find a way to do some fairly long test rides, if that's even remotely possible !

I stopped riding cruisers because the position hurt my low back .

The small wheels on the lesser sized scooters concern me .
If they are anything like the Lambretta's & Vespa's of old that would make them very spooky handling wise.

I do still ride fairly sporty in my old age, but have slowed down a lot in the last few years. Amazing at what you see when you knock off a few miles an hour and start to smell the flowers.
There are big wheel scooters. My SYM Citycom is a 263cc scoot with 16 inch wheels, a 60 inch wheelbase and an upright riding position. if I was a more normal size person I could have got a SYM HD200 a smaller 16 inch big wheel scoot that is a real pocket rocket; being as quick and nearly as fast as my larger machine.

I have found my SYM to require much less repair (almost none) than my bikes.

I owned a RT-80 for 10 years and the riding position of my scoot very much reminds me of my 84 BMW. If the Beemer is still good; why not keep it for the longer trips and get a nifty agile mid-size scoot for blitzing the twisties. There are deals to be had on noncurrent scooters. If money is really tight a used SYM HD 200 would be very inexpensive. I found that once I got used to my Citycom which didn't take long; my big bike has pretty much been gathering dust.

The handling on my scoot is outstanding. I often find myself cornering faster than I would have on my V-Strom 1000 without even trying.

Phipsd screwed with this post 07-28-2012 at 12:13 AM
Phipsd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2012, 06:10 AM   #12
DandyDoug OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Lewisville, NC
Oddometer: 378
Pardon my ignorance , but what the heck is a SYM ?
Never heard of the brand, where do you find them , and what about parts/service ?
DandyDoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2012, 10:25 AM   #13
hexnut
just cruising
 
hexnut's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: middle Tennessee
Oddometer: 1,443
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandyDoug View Post
Pardon my ignorance , but what the heck is a SYM ?
Never heard of the brand, where do you find them , and what about parts/service ?
SYM, Sanyang Industry Co., LTD is the 2nd largest scooter manufacturer in Taiwan. Kymco being the largest. They started out as a joint venture with Honda in 1962. They made the Honda Cub for Honda for many years. A couple of years ago their US distributor Carter Brothers in Alabama had a ware house fire and lost every thing. There is a new distributor now that is trying to build the brand back up and add dealers.

SYM is a solid scooter with a good rep. The new distributor is Alliance PowerSports. They don't have all the scooters in their line up that Carter Brothers had but they are working on it.

http://alliancepowersports.com/

More on SYM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SYM_Motors
__________________
2014 Harley Sportster 883 Superlow

hexnuts...a curse put on your balls by a mean gypsy
3/5 Cav, C Troop, BlackKnights, Vietnam 1969
hexnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2012, 10:18 AM   #14
cdwise
Studly Adventurer
 
cdwise's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: Houston, TX/Breckenridge, CO
Oddometer: 903
Same in Houston, I've seen snow 6 times in 24 years and it never lated more than a few hours. Another roughly a dozen days with ice on the road (once for 4 straight days which closed the schools for 3 of them driving parents nuts) but that's not much. Our Colorado scoots are stored in a garage with stabil and a trickle charger. One of the women near me in Colorado does store her m/c over the winter in a rented space but she stores other stuff there too since she has no garage or storage at her home for less than $100 a month. She pulls the battery and takes it inside her apartment.
cdwise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2012, 07:17 AM   #15
Midnullarbor
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Oddometer: 324
No doubt the Burgman would be fine : and it is a known factor . . . likewise the T-Max (for sporty handling).
The as-yet-unproven BMW will offer high performance (plus price).
Same applies to the new Honda-700 scooter, which might [eventually] turn out to be the best, taking things overall.

I reckon there's a good possibility something slightly smaller & lighter might be more fun ~ as mentioned above, the big-wheel Kymco-300, Honda-300, and the new Beverley-350.
All have lots of power, provided you're happy to do most of your riding at less than 80 mph.
Pocket battleships, you might say.
(There are other 300's . . . but they are of the previous generation, and don't have quite the same level of power which a "downsizing" rider would hope to find.)
Midnullarbor is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014