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Old 12-15-2012, 09:17 PM   #1
brandonmccann OP
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Bike for a short person?

I've been interested in an Aprila Shiver 750 but I'm starting to worry if it will be too tall. Now, the common suggestion would be to simply go and try it out but it's a 5 hour drive to the nearest dealership and I need to have some more insight before I spend the time for the trip.

The bike in question is a 2009 Aprilia Shiver 750. Although, I am also open to other suggestions. I'll be using the bike on the highway and around town, as my primary means of transportation. I weigh around 160 and my height is around 5' 4"/5' 5"

Thanks in adv.
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Old 12-15-2012, 10:16 PM   #2
JustKip
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I'd say it depends on how good of a rider you are, and how comitted to having both feet flat on the ground. The seat on the Shiver is fairly narrow, so the almost 32" seat height might not be as bad as it would seem. But it still might be a bit of a stretch.
Here's a great comparison review, with the bike I would suggest you take a good look at-the Monster 796

http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/28/843...on-Review.aspx

The monster has a half inch lower seat and is 50 lbs lighter. The Monster 696 is another half inch closer to the ground(a full inch lower than the Shiver), and is still a hoot to ride.

JustKip screwed with this post 12-15-2012 at 10:26 PM
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Old 12-15-2012, 10:18 PM   #3
tedder
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Google says it's nearly a 32" seat height. Not a problem if you have experience on bikes- if it's your first, perhaps start shorter and smaller (ccs).
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Old 12-16-2012, 12:39 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedder View Post
Google says it's nearly a 32" seat height. Not a problem if you have experience on bikes- if it's your first, perhaps start shorter and smaller (ccs).
Yeah, it will be my first. I know of a place where I can get some experience with it before I take it out anywhere crowded and my town is small so the traffic is weak. I don't think I should go with a smaller displacement though. I live right off the highway and the highway here is 75-80mph.

My pants have an inseam of 32 and drag a little when I'm not wearing my boots, which add about 2 inches to my height. Do you think I could get my feet comfortably on the pegs?

brandonmccann screwed with this post 12-16-2012 at 12:48 AM
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Old 12-16-2012, 04:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
Yeah, it will be my first. I know of a place where I can get some experience with it before I take it out anywhere crowded and my town is small so the traffic is weak. I don't think I should go with a smaller displacement though. I live right off the highway and the highway here is 75-80mph.

My pants have an inseam of 32 and drag a little when I'm not wearing my boots, which add about 2 inches to my height. Do you think I could get my feet comfortably on the pegs?
I'm seeing a few "red flags" here.
It will be your first bike, and only transportation? How much riding have you done? You're talking about a fairly powerful and sporty bike, with a seat height that will keep your feet off the ground. The hardest part of riding is low speed manuvers, starting and (especially)stopping. I always recomment starting with something you can reach the ground with, and with a fairly predictable power delivery....and that won't cost a fortune when you drop it!
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:14 PM   #6
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Well It's not the only transportation I'll have, but rather what I'd choose. My car gets half the gas mileage that the shiver would and gas doesn't run too cheap. If it's raining or the roads are slick or I need to carry stuff I can always take my car.

Would it be possible to lower it down to 30 inches by changing the shocks and the forks?
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:22 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
Well It's not the only transportation I'll have, but rather what I'd choose. My car gets half the gas mileage that the shiver would and gas doesn't run too cheap. If it's raining or the roads are slick or I need to carry stuff I can always take my car.
If you are going to have something as a backup, perhaps you don't need as large of a bike for your first one? Look at the Ninja 250 and CBR250 for great starter bikes that can keep up on fast interstates.

Also, I tend to feel it's a fallacy that motorcycling is cheaper than caging. You are going to keep your car (and insurance), and the difference in gas is more than offset by buying riding gear, replacing tires and other high-cost items, and paying for additional (and more expensive) moto insurance. This doesn't mean motorcycling is BAD- just that it's not necessarily cheaper.

Quote:
Would it be possible to lower it down to 30 inches by changing the shocks and the forks?
Google doesn't indicate there is a lot to be gained from lowering. Some bikes are more amenable to that- the F650 is a great example. Other bikes (cruisers, Buells, Ninja250 and CBR250) start out at a short-person-friendly height.
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Old 12-17-2012, 06:58 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
Well It's not the only transportation I'll have, but rather what I'd choose. My car gets half the gas mileage that the shiver would and gas doesn't run too cheap. If it's raining or the roads are slick or I need to carry stuff I can always take my car.

Would it be possible to lower it down to 30 inches by changing the shocks and the forks?
My wife's inseam is 26". She has owned 4 bikes and I have had to lower all of them, but I mod bikes so am comfortable doing this. Some are easier to lower than others. Every bike I have lowered compromised the overall suspension and handling to some extent.

I just took a look at the Shiver 750 and it can be lowered a couple of inches by adjustment/replacement of shock/spring and raising the forks an 1" or so maybe. You can also change tire specs and gain another 1/2" in some cases. They make low profile tires mostly for motards but the rubber is soft so do not last as long. On some ABS bikes the different tire size will cause a fault with the ABS.

My wife's 696 Monster was very easy to lower. A 1100 S shock with new spring for her lighter weight is adjustable enough to allow almost 2" lower.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandonmccann View Post
My pants have an inseam of 32....


Your height has nothing to do with which bike you can comfortably manage, but your inseam does play a role. If what you said above is true, you shouldn't have a problem getting your feet on the ground with most bikes. I only have a 30" inseam and have owned various tall bikes, from single cylinder thumpers such as the DRZ and the KLR, to Adventure bikes like the Ulysses, Tigers, etc...

While not necessary, having your feet planted firmly on the ground at stops does help your confidence. When it's all said and done, getting miles under your belt will build your confidence more than anything, regardless of bike choice.
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:16 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Dirtysouth View Post
Your height has nothing to do with which bike you can comfortably manage, but your inseam does play a role. If what you said above is true, you shouldn't have a problem getting your feet on the ground with most bikes. I only have a 30" inseam and have owned various tall bikes, from single cylinder thumpers such as the DRZ and the KLR, to Adventure bikes like the Ulysses, Tigers, etc...

While not necessary, having your feet planted firmly on the ground at stops does help your confidence. When it's all said and done, getting miles under your belt will build your confidence more than anything, regardless of bike choice.
True! See the OP's inseam vs. mine as a great e.g.. He obviously has a "very short upper torso" whereas I have a tall torso but short legs. I have always privately felt that had I my brothers legs and my torso I might have made it in baseball a bit further...
When you get away from level surfaces it is quite easy to drop a hvy bike if you cannot plant either foot. It can also be easy to drop one(remember I'm an exp rider too) in a parking lot-I did it in a Wendy's after I put down a foot(didn't notice it as a dangerous spot) on a slick oil spot to hold my bike-cost me a windshield! That bike had a lowered seat to suit me. You cannot be too careful when stopped.
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Old 12-16-2012, 01:28 AM   #11
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Yamaha makes one

You should look at. It is the FZ6R and has been made from 09 thru the present. The seat height is 30" and the weight is 450. I ride with friends that all have 1200's and I hang with them.

A second point-if your Aprilia dealer is 250 miles away from your home--that might be a PITA for routine maintanance and the occasional drop repair.

DONOT look at the FZ6. It is 2" taller. Think Japanese if possible-their dealer network is much stronger. GL with your search.
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Old 12-16-2012, 01:34 AM   #12
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BMW makes

A F800ST with the factory lowered suspension. If you had this model with the low seat--you could flat foot at a stop.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:52 AM   #13
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The seat height is manageable, but you'll be on your toes, and that is sometimes daunting at first. My wife is 5'5" and has an aprilia mana (31.5) seat height, and she does fine. We initially lowered it - with a different shock, and dropping the forks, but went back to stock height when she got more comfortable to get back some suspension travel. The shiver is a cool bike, an under appreciated gem of a middleweight.

So to sum up - you could manage the height, but would probably be more comfortable with something lower, at least at first. If you're set on the shiver, it can be lowered if you want.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:59 AM   #14
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I just bought for my wife a BMW F700GS with a short kit suspension and low seat. It is 5 cms shorter than stock serie.

Enviado desde mi GT-I9100 usando Tapatalk 2
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Old 12-16-2012, 06:06 AM   #15
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Maybe this will help you out. Compare the ergos of this bike to bikes you're familiar with. Then you'll have a better idea wether the trip is worth it or not....... http://cycle-ergo.com/
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