ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Road warriors
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-15-2013, 01:50 PM   #1
Krazyjohnny OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: McKinney, TX
Oddometer: 443
Question Question from the other half

So the wife completed her motorcycle safety course this weekend. She had to do the classroom stuff at the local Harley shop and then did the "range" stuff elsewhere. Most of the instructors are all LEO types and they ride the HD stuff. She also said the stealership guy came in and gave them the sales pitch.

Her question to me was, "Why do people choose a Harley cruiser type bike over a lighter weight, more manueverable bike?" My answer was that different people feel more comfortable on them I guess. I am not an HD fan because they do not appeal to me.

Can anyone else add any insight as to what makes the HD popular besides being part of the "cool guy" crowd? How about what makes the Sport touring bike more popular? The latter being my favorite. If I were buying a large bike I would just buy a Gold Wing. I am not quite there yet, but know it may come someday.
__________________
President and Founder of
Superhero Proving Grounds
"Where dreams are made and egos are checked"
2013 Ducati Multistrada, 08' 530 EXCR, 09' Yamaha FZ-6
Krazyjohnny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 02:14 PM   #2
High Country Herb
Adventure Connoiseur
 
High Country Herb's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Western Sierras
Oddometer: 7,773
I'm not necessarily a Harley guy either, but can understand their appeal on a couple of levels:

1. Americans like to buy products made in the USA to support the "local" economy.
2. Harleys, especially the larger models, are said to be very comfortable on the open road.
3. Americans like the aesthetics of big loud machines. The same phenomenon also causes people to prefer 60s muscle cars over high strung sports cars, even if the imports are faster.

At the moment, Harley doesn't make a bike that fits my needs. Some day, when I have a garage big enough to fit one, that may change.

So did your wife ride the 500 Buell during her motorcycle safety course? My wife is about to take the class, and I think they will be riding 250 cc bikes of some sort. I am curious what she thought of the Buell.
High Country Herb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 06:35 PM   #3
scapegoat
Pushin forward back
 
scapegoat's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Out west.....somewhere
Oddometer: 2,874
[QUOTE=High Country Herb;21192079]I'm not necessarily a Harley guy either, but can understand their appeal on a couple of levels:

1. Americans like to buy products made in the USA to support the "local" economy.
2. Harleys, especially the larger models, are said to be very comfortable on the open road.
3. Americans like the aesthetics of big loud machines. The same phenomenon also causes people to prefer 60s muscle cars over high strung sports cars, even if the imports are faster.

Nice, though Id like to add to this one as a Harley owner. Yes Buying American is a big part. I own a Buell also. At 52 a 170 mph bike would spell disaster for me, I wouldn't know what to do with it anymore. Big heavy bikes ride like big caddys. No hand numbing leaning forward on a sport bike and room to roam with floor boards and a big seat.
For the gals, seat height is a factor like in the 883 L, very sedate and easy to ride.
Personally the big loud thing is fading with age and its just not really cool anymore. The lifestyle is embarrassing, not all of us HD owners are pirate idiot riders.
__________________
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
scapegoat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 07:26 PM   #4
dceggert
Gnarly Adventurer
 
dceggert's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Metro Detroit - almost like offroad riding
Oddometer: 213
HD vs. Other

My HD Ultra Classic is in no way appropriate for a new rider. However, if I want to ride from Detroit to Salt Lake City on either the highway or freeway and stop occasionally along the way to take pics or investigate side roads, this is the bike to take.

If I need to go from Detroit to Salt Lake City to get to an appointment on time, the BMW K1200GT is the bike to take.

If I want to ride from Detroit to Salt Lake City and ride a combination of freeway, highway, side roads, and dirt roads then an R1200GS is perfect.

All of these are larger bikes and difficult for new riders but they are what we seem to gravitate to when we realize with experience that the smaller and lighter bikes don't handle these adventures with as much grace and capability.

Riding around town is different and even a DR125SE handles that with ease.
__________________
regards,
Dan
2006 BMW K1200GT (the Jagdpanther has arrived as of 5-Aug-2011)
2005 R1200GS (sold)
1999 HD Ultra Classic
dceggert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2013, 12:39 AM   #5
joexr
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: S.E.
Oddometer: 3,773
Not picking on HD , one of my friends owns a shop , but I don't exactly call that RIDING. HD riders just SIT on bikes going down the road a lot. I don't know what kind of riding there is there , but you're probably not riding demanding roads. Sportbikes aren't designed or bought for touring , so that's why you're not seeing them. There's nothing wrong with touring. I'm 50 years old , I ride better than most people , half my age or not , and I'm not near yet ready for a rolling couch.
joexr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2013, 07:31 AM   #6
dceggert
Gnarly Adventurer
 
dceggert's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Metro Detroit - almost like offroad riding
Oddometer: 213
Quote:
Originally Posted by joexr View Post
Not picking on HD , one of my friends owns a shop , but I don't exactly call that RIDING. HD riders just SIT on bikes going down the road a lot. I don't know what kind of riding there is there , but you're probably not riding demanding roads. Sportbikes aren't designed or bought for touring , so that's why you're not seeing them. There's nothing wrong with touring. I'm 50 years old , I ride better than most people , half my age or not , and I'm not near yet ready for a rolling couch.
When I first bought my HD Ultra Classic I was appalled by the handling of the "rolling couch." Coming from a long line of BMW bikes at the time I was used to a much tighter feel with deeper lean angles. I was second guessing my purchase.

Then one day I watched a motor officer do a u-turn in the middle of a street and chase a sport bike rider who was popping wheelies adjacent to a park. The sport bike rider thought about running and left at a high rate of speed; the motor officer on an Electraglide hung with him. The sport bike rider gave up and pulled over.

I then decided to find out what was wrong with my Ultra as I could not handle mine like that. After asking a lot of questions and hooking up with the right people I found out that is was not the bike; it was me.

A very kind motor officer then gave me some instruction and I was on my way to doing a much better job of tossing the Ultra around and yes, you can toss it. What you need to do is not 'control it' so to speak but 'point it' and let it go. If it feels unsettled you, the rider, needs to get used to that. The Ultra is not a sport bike by any means but it is not just a rolling couch either.

There are two types of HD riders out there and one is much more common than the other. I doubt there are many on this site of the most common variety; those that ride 500 miles a year between bars and bike shows. When I mount my BMW or Ultra I have my Aerostich on, Schuberth helmet, waterproof boots, etc. and I am intending to put some dashed lines behind me. With 77,000 miles on the Ultra's clock now I can say it is actually a pretty impressive ride.

You do not have to participate in the tire kicking, beer drinking, black leather vest crowd with a pirate 'dew rag' if you do not want to!
__________________
regards,
Dan
2006 BMW K1200GT (the Jagdpanther has arrived as of 5-Aug-2011)
2005 R1200GS (sold)
1999 HD Ultra Classic
dceggert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 07:28 PM   #7
roadstar
Gnarly Adventurer
 
roadstar's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Lancaster PA
Oddometer: 362
"The lifestyle is embarrassing, not all of us HD owners are pirate idiot riders. "


I say Rrrrrrrr !!! we have a couple of pirates at work that did own Jap cruisers before they bought there Harleys & they sure did soak up the life style. They own every style tee shirt & dress shirts, & don`t wear anything but HD wear. They alway give me hell about my BMW`s but most of my wear is from Yamaha & Kawasaki & i don`t own a thing that says BMW.

Back to bikes , i`d say anything 400 to 650 is a good start . If i was a little shorter i`d go & buy a Buell blast for around towner. (an HD but not really)

__________________
IBA # 47424
2012 Concours (Black)
76 Honda GL1000 (red & naked)
roadstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 08:04 PM   #8
waveydavey
happy times!!
 
waveydavey's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Pulling dragons from the ground again
Oddometer: 9,380
After riding for 40 years and owning and riding over 40 motorcycles of all types I decided that I had to have a Harley. So I bought a new one in 2008. As some have speculated in this thread I, like most other HD owners, bought it just so I could look and feel cool. And that has worked out just fine.
__________________
"...once the honey was gone he wandered off, farting and too soon satisfied."



FUCK CANCER!!!!
waveydavey is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 08:17 PM   #9
roadstar
Gnarly Adventurer
 
roadstar's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Lancaster PA
Oddometer: 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by waveydavey View Post
After riding for 40 years and owning and riding over 40 motorcycles of all types I decided that I had to have a Harley. So I bought a new one in 2008. As some have speculated in this thread I, like most other HD owners, bought it just so I could look and feel cool. And that has worked out just fine.
I hope you don`t ride with that green bathing suit
__________________
IBA # 47424
2012 Concours (Black)
76 Honda GL1000 (red & naked)
roadstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 08:23 PM   #10
ShimrMoon
Gnarly Adventurer
 
ShimrMoon's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Matthews NC
Oddometer: 332
As a new rider, she should look elsewhere for a bike. Something in the 250cc range. HD has absolutely nothing suitable for ANY new rider.
__________________
"I don't like repeat offenders, I like dead offenders.." Ted Nugent

13 BMW GTL, 10 BMW RT, 09 Suz Vstrom 650A,
02 BMW LTc, 92 BMW R100R (wish I still had it)
ShimrMoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 12:27 AM   #11
sc00tertrash
Adventurer
 
sc00tertrash's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Porland, OR
Oddometer: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShimrMoon View Post
As a new rider, she should look elsewhere for a bike. Something in the 250cc range. HD has absolutely nothing suitable for ANY new rider.
+1 to that!

Many riders (myself included) started out on Ninja 250s. There is really something to be said about spending some time learning to ride a bike to its full potential before upgrading to a new bike. It's great for building confidence and also gives you a much better feel for your own style and what you may want in future bikes.
__________________
"I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth." -Steve McQueen
sc00tertrash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2013, 01:04 AM   #12
2tallnwide
Beastly Adventurer
 
2tallnwide's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Nature Coast, Florida
Oddometer: 2,351
Why?

Because they're bad ass....

http://youtu.be/37xHc-XglQA

__________________
If you're gonna dish it out make sure it tastes good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBkh6lrOfT4

2tallnwide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 02:32 PM   #13
rico2072
Gnarly Adventurer
 
rico2072's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Tampa Fl
Oddometer: 320
It's changing slowly but surely.
I'm a sportbike guy, but I can see the sport tourer and dual sport bikes are on the rise.
__________________
"Beware of the lollipop of mediocrity. One lick and you'll suck forever!"Brian Wilson
rico2072 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 02:38 PM   #14
Cakeeater
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Where it snows a lot
Oddometer: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krazyjohnny View Post
So the wife completed her motorcycle safety course this weekend. She had to do the classroom stuff at the local Harley shop and then did the "range" stuff elsewhere. Most of the instructors are all LEO types and they ride the HD stuff. She also said the stealership guy came in and gave them the sales pitch.

Her question to me was, "Why do people choose a Harley cruiser type bike over a lighter weight, more manueverable bike?" My answer was that different people feel more comfortable on them I guess. I am not an HD fan because they do not appeal to me.

Can anyone else add any insight as to what makes the HD popular besides being part of the "cool guy" crowd? How about what makes the Sport touring bike more popular? The latter being my favorite. If I were buying a large bike I would just buy a Gold Wing. I am not quite there yet, but know it may come someday.

Try riding some.

Cakeeater
Cakeeater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2013, 02:58 PM   #15
blk-betty
bam-a-lam
 
blk-betty's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Charleston, SC
Oddometer: 2,367
Seat height.

Very low which makes new riders feel more comfortable and planted when they can flat foot both feet, especially so with female riders.

HD cruisers are heavy even Sportsters, but they all carry their weight down low so one does not need as much upper body strength to feel comfortable riding them and with both feet on the ground you feel more in control and less likley to drop it like a taller bike with higher cog, again a plus with female riders who generally have less upper body strength than males.

They are very easy to ride slowly, geared low with lots of tq so not alot of shifting and throttle action needed to easily cruise down the road or ride in heavy traffic.

I constaly hear that HDs or cruiser are terrible "first" or "newbie" bikes and I have personally ridden all sorts of bikes and feel that cruisers are the easiest most relaxed type of bike to ride.

Sort of like comparing a heavy beach cruiser bicycle to a tall and light mountain bike or road bike. Sure the mountain or road bike will perform better than the beach bike but on a flat smooth surface the beach bike is easier to ride for someone not proficient on 2 wheels.
__________________
Any day on a dirt road is a great day
blk-betty is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014