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Old 07-25-2009, 08:44 PM   #196
Zecatfish
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Shoe Goop!

Obsolete gaskets, like float bowl gaskets, if you careful applying it in a thin bead and let it setup over night to 24 hours. Shoe Goop can be used to replace the wasted/missing gasket.
Do not put it together till its setup OR you will play hell getting back apart.
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Old 08-04-2009, 07:52 PM   #197
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Another one for the super glue. When I discovered that bulk oring is mated with a glue that is essentially cyanoacrylate I started using it on other broken gaskets in a pinch. Even a flat fiber gasket can be mended quite well enough to "get home" if it's glued right where the torn faces mate and then put back into use. Super glue works suprisingly well even in dirty and oily conditions.

Ok, one more super glue. Along with a tube of the stuff in my toolkit I also carry a dispenser of unwaxed dental floss. Wrapping, knotting, and soaking with super glue you can make some pretty imaginative and amazingly strong permanent and temporary repairs to things.
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Old 08-05-2009, 04:40 AM   #198
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THe superglue and floss is a VERY interesting idea- even better if it works.
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Old 08-05-2009, 07:47 AM   #199
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First time i used that was on a nearly broken fiberglass fishing rod in the seventies. The rod itself had snapped but not separated. I noticed that the eyelet guides on the pole were basically fastened with layered thread underneath the fiberglass resin. Not having glass thread and two part fiberglass resin on hand I just figured I could approximate it with dental floss and superglue. Back then superglue was the coolest thing since the moon landing and we were trying it on everything we could think of. The fishing pole still works just fine!.

A variation is to mend two sections of cracked flat plastic material. There is a similar photo in a thread here on wirewrapping skills.


You drill holes on either side of the crack sufficient to sew the panel together tightly with dental floss and then duab in two part epoxy on both sides to soak into the holes and the floss. Superglue works good too for very small versions of this but is too thin to give much structural support to larger mends. In the photo above the holes are drilled (or melted with a hot pin) in a line on either side of the fracture. But for better strength they should be slightly staggered in a zig zag instead of a line. A straight stitch is fine for fabric, but any straight line of holes in a rigid panel is going produce a "perf line" just waiting to be refractured.

I've got a few examples of this still going strong on panels, toys, covers, guards. Funny thing is that it is about as aesthetically unpleasing as it gets on an otherwise well groomed and maintained machine, but if you look at it like a stitched battle scar (exactly how it looks after epoxying), it actually looks pretty cool. And it costs about 1/200 the price of a new part.

Related to above (honest, I don't sell this stuff) is if you ever notice a stitch in clothing, shoes, seats, apholstery, etc, loosening or broken immediately put a small drop of superglue on either side where the thread continues into the fabric. It'll hold up like this indefinitely until you can get it mended properly.

(and since we're talking Macgyver and not Heloise here, I'll give this up for now)

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Old 08-05-2009, 10:33 AM   #200
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Sweet! Gotta try some of that sometime.
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Old 08-07-2009, 02:12 PM   #201
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svejkovat
A variation is to mend two sections of cracked flat plastic material. There is a similar photo in a thread here on wirewrapping skills.

I award this 3 and 1/2 stars (out of four)
1 star for thrifty
1 star for ingenious
1 star for durable
1/2 star for most butt ugly
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Old 08-08-2009, 06:04 AM   #202
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About 40 miles out on a 800 mile trip I had a pushrod jump of its cam follower. A roadside engine strip revealed that the alloy rod end had been severely chewed up. I used the flat section of a piece of roadside rock to roughly re-radius the damaged end and the nail file from my Swiss Army knife to fine tune it so it would fit cleanly back into its cup. Amazingly enough, I completed the trip but have since paid much more attention to tappet clearances and now use chromoly pushrods.

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Old 08-08-2009, 06:14 AM   #203
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Push Rodding

Nice to see rthat your friend is so upset about it that he is puking...

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c1...g?t=1249736024



Quote:
Originally Posted by Cariboo_kid
About 40 miles out on a 800 mile trip I had a pushrod jump of its cam follower. A roadside engine strip revealed that the alloy rod end had been severely chewed up. I used the flat section of a piece of roadside rock to roughly re-radius the damaged end and the nail file from my Swiss Army knife to fine tune it so it would fit cleanly back into its cup. Amazingly enough, I completed the trip but have since paid much more attention to tappet clearances and now use chromoly pushrods.
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c1...g?t=1249736024

I really have to learn how to properly post pictures.
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Old 08-08-2009, 06:26 AM   #204
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[quote=Motoriley]Nice to see that your friend is so upset about it that he is puking...

Puking is about the most polite response most folks assume.
He's looking for a grassy spot to place the fuel tank.
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Old 08-09-2009, 01:45 AM   #205
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I had an old Triumph in college and had to cummute 40 miles each way. One day on the freeway it suddenly backfired one time and died. I coasted to the shoulder and tried to start it. Nothing. I popped the hood. Nothing obviously wrong. For some reason I removed the dist cap and touched the rotor, which spun freely. OK, so the drive gear came off the dist shaft. I had the tools to remove the dist and a magnet to retrieve the gear which fortunately had nowhere to fall. It had been held on with an expansion pin which was nowhere in sight. I searched the car and found a very old pen that had a brass refill in it. Yup, they used to use brass tubes to hold ink in pens. I slid the refill into the hole and bent the ends. Cut off the excess. I was able to static time the engine by removing #1 plug and grounding it to the block. Then rotate the crank until it the timing marks lined up. Rotating the dist backward until the plug fired and then lock it down. I was back on the road in 15 minutes and pretty damn pleased with myself. The refill held until I got home.
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Old 08-09-2009, 11:01 AM   #206
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I posted another thread about the tiny holes on the ends of my BMW axles. Both axles have holes in the unthreaded end sufficient to put a rod through in order to 'wrench' off the opposite nut. But on that end with the hole there is another very small hole drilled from the axle rod end axis through to the bigger hole. There is a bit of countersink on this hole.

One day I decided that this hole must be another of those cool WWII era vestiges of uber-clever german engineering to enable mechanics to static balance wheels in the trenches. I put a plumb wire into this hole, knotted the end, and thus hung the wheel horizontally at eye level above my bench. A real slow spin quickly points out the heavy spot and stick-on weights (or bending and pounding a couple of 8mm Mauser slugs around a spoke nipple for real field authenticity) sets the whole thing to perfection. The same dynamic as a bubble level wheel balancer, but this one can be done hanging from any tree limb. It worked just fine for my purposes. But I was still never able to get confirmation that this was its purpose.

I posted here and at another forum and the concensus is that these were merely pilot holes for the lathe center. One guy's photos actually showed teeth marks around this hole on his axles which might reinforce this explanation. But the holes go all the way through. That's not uncommon they say. I don't know. It' just seems too cool to have these holes there for emergency (macgyver) balancing. Certainly easier and more accurate than trying to find the heavy spot vertically against the friction of the wheel bearings. Anyone else seen what I'm talking about on their bikes?

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Old 08-10-2009, 07:02 AM   #207
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Hell with it, let's just make this a Macgyver meets Heloise thread.

Another tinkering must-have is a good supply of electronic/electrical shrink tubing. The adhesive lined stuff is the best, but it's also harder to find and pretty expensive, so a roll of Scotch double sided clear tape is a handy addition to your shrink tubing collection. A layer of this tape before applying and shrinking the tubing waterproofs and binds the whole nicely.

EVERY repair to wiring on my bikes gets sealed shrink tubing over it. Look for sales on the stuff at Harbor Freight. After catching a few sales, I was able to literally fill a drawer with a wide variety of it pretty cheaply. It's well made stuff with impressive looking certifications stamped on it. (probably not nasa grade, but so what)

Beyond just sealing electrical connections, it makes a great end treatment to any cloth/woven reinforced hoses (like the fuel lines that you find on older classics) that would otherwise fray at the ends.

Cutting shrink tubing into a few staggered lenghts and applying one at a time you can make excellent strain relief for any cable ends. It looks like it came factory that way. The oddest use I found was for resealing the lenses on my tach and speedo. Had to replace the glass on both and lenses were bound to the bodies with factory crimped aluminum rings. No way to recrimp with any integrity at all. I sent an email to 3M asking for a sample of their 4" dia adhesive lined shrink tubing and crossed my fingers. (buying it would have cost almost as much as a new tachometer). They happily sent me a three foot section in the mail as a sample! I cut two strips about 1.5 inch wide and VERY patiently arranged them around the new lenses aligned with the bodies and shrunk them in place. A little exacto trimming and it looked factory done!

Shrink tubing seems to have been invented with macgyver in mind.
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Old 08-10-2009, 07:31 AM   #208
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I had the red needle on a bike's speedo get warped in the sun over time. About a 2.5 inch Red plastic shaft with a trianglular cross section. Somehow, probably because of the black dial behind, the sun's heat had warped the needle upward and the end was pushing against the lens and would move no further, stuck there at about 60mph. This gauge lens was also permanently sealed with crimped metal so I was looking at quite a job just to replace the needle.

It was a hot sunny day and I got an inspiration that perhaps I could just reverse the process of bending the needle. I got a medium sized magnifying glass and VERY patiently started focusing it along the needle's section facing me. I hoped to relax this inner radius of the bow and see if the needle would droop back into it's original position. It worked, but the moment it started to rest back into shape it dropped back to 0 mph and rested against the metal pin. It was still grazing the glass. Now any further softening with the magnifying glass might bend the needle sideways because of its tension against the limit pin. Hmmmmm. I disconnected the cable at the other end and attached a variable speed drill. Bringing the speed up to about ten miles an hour I went back at the needle with the magnifying glass. With extreme care, aiming my white hot little bead, keeping it moving so that it didn't burn, I was finally able to massage the curve of the needle back to nearly original without having to remove the lens!

That one felt pretty cool.
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Old 08-10-2009, 07:40 PM   #209
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svejkovat
With extreme care, aiming my white hot little bead, keeping it moving so that it didn't burn, I was finally able to massage the curve of the needle back to nearly original without having to remove the lens!

That one felt pretty cool.
Brilliant, absolutely brilliant.
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Old 08-10-2009, 10:38 PM   #210
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svejkovat
With extreme care, aiming my white hot little bead, keeping it moving so that it didn't burn, I was finally able to massage the curve of the needle back to nearly original without having to remove the lens!

That one felt pretty cool.
+1. Hats off to you!
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