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Old 04-01-2010, 07:19 AM   #61
tigerboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Ernie
That one always bothred me. As a person growing up in big cities, I never saw a dirt bike and certainly never heard of anywhere to ride one. Maybe things are different now, but if you live in a city- not everyone can afford a dirt bike AND a pick-up.
As a city slicker for the first 30 years of my life, more or less, I naturally thought the same thing. If I could do it over, I would have gotten out of the city, and taken a dirt bike school, then back home, gotten a light street legal dual sport like a XT225 or CR230 and learned the limits of a bike (most cities have rough areas to practise in), then graduate to a Motard (bike I NOW own).

Anyway, that's my advice to someone who wants to learn how to ride but hasn't yet sat on a bike, and what I'd do if I could do it over.

Quote:
Originally Posted by R-A-M-O-N
DONT crash your bike.

It seems stupid but some people specially in cars seems to not care if they risk a turn and crash their vehicle. In a bike it is very important to be extra carefull because any crash could mean a serious injury wether you are wearing gear or not.
Well, ain't that the truth. This is why so many people are not paying attention when they drive, on the phone or texting. They figure the 6000 lbs of steel surrounding them are their safety factor. We don't have that, so we have to watch out for those nuts.
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Old 04-01-2010, 08:17 AM   #62
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Stay in the moment, here and now. Don't let your mind wander.

Focus on riding. Don't think about anything else.
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Old 04-01-2010, 02:25 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerboy



Well, ain't that the truth. This is why so many people are not paying attention when they drive, on the phone or texting. They figure the 6000 lbs of steel surrounding them are their safety factor. We don't have that, so we have to watch out for those nuts.
I do sometimes fall prey to some complacency while driving because I feel so deprived off what is going around me at times -- locked away in a cage. I force myself to remember that I am making payments on the car and how much it will cost to get it fixed if somebody hits me/I hit somebody. I also focus on the fact that 90 percent of my driving is with my wife as my passenger and the last thing I want is for her to be hurt because I wasn't paying attention.
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Old 04-01-2010, 03:32 PM   #64
Shakerattleandroll
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When I was learning to drive a cage many moons ago, my ole' man...God rest his soul, dropped something on the floor and as I turned to look at what he dropped he said "well we just hit that tree when you took your eyes off the road"...humm whatever crazy old man. I've never forgotten that lesson, in fact thats the same tactic I used on my kids.

ALWAYS ride like that car is going to cut you off or that rock is going to be in the road around that corner or that deer will wait until you are right beside it before it jumps across the road.

Keep the rubber side down and the shiny side up
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Old 04-01-2010, 04:45 PM   #65
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There are lots, but I'll stick with two:

1. Check your ego. Most of the hairy spots & close calls I've had were because my ego couldn't handle being passed, or a bonehead move by a thoughtless or aggressive cager. Let. It. Go.

2. Strive for smoothness. Smooth is fast, smooth is safe, smooth is easier on motorcycle and you, and smooth just plain looks cool.

ok, I lied, three:

3. Never stop learning (great thread).

Cheers to the n00bs and the geezers.
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Old 04-01-2010, 05:05 PM   #66
Jeff_CA
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- Plan to spend $1,000 on gear when you buy the bike – or before you buy it. Spend money on your safety, your comfort then farkles. In that order.
- Practice.
- Helmet, then gloves.
- Wear ear plugs.
- Buy a center stand.
- Leaves on the ground are slippery. Wet leaves are evil.
- Practice
- Riding two-up can be fun. Don’t even think about it until you put a few thousand miles (at least) on the odometer solo.
- Park facing uphill, in first gear.
- Practice.
- Have fun.
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Old 04-01-2010, 06:45 PM   #67
softwaretool
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"It's not the bike, it's the rider"
I like this quote.
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Old 04-01-2010, 07:07 PM   #68
BluegrassPicker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_CA
[FONT=Arial][COLOR=white]- Spend money on your safety, your comfort then farkles.
PERFECT
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Old 04-01-2010, 07:19 PM   #69
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Lot's of good info here so I won't repeat my faves already mentioned. However you only have two wheels between you and the ground, learn to do regular checks and maintenance of your ride, tire pressure etc. Nothing sucks more than a mishap due to mechanical failure.
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Old 04-01-2010, 08:12 PM   #70
Respen
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As a noob rider, I've learned quite a few things since I began riding in October.

1. Every time I've felt confident in what I was doing, I was about to do something stupid.

2. I still haven't learned to trust my tires while leaning, so I stay around the posted speed limit.

3. Almost everyday I've ridden, I've been cut-off or almost run over. Stay alert and don't bother getting mad at the cagers, they're just idiots.

4. Don't suddenly grab your front brake while the handlebars are turned. I did this three times before learning my lesson. They were zero speed drops, but still quite embarrassing.

5. Patience! If I don't take my time, think and look before doing anything, I will do something stupid.

Excellent post and wonderful website. I hope to be as awesome as the rest of you someday!
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:39 AM   #71
phennliegh
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Learn to read: the pavement, obstacles and the future.
- The pavement; more than just wet/dry or smooth/rough. Painted areas, the center oiled strip, dust, grit, gravel, general debris and so much more.
- Obstacles; other vehicles, including motorcycles, intersections, lighting and glare, areas of light and dark can really change your view
- The future; right now you are upright and things are fine, what about 2 seconds/minutes from now. Don't just watch the cager in front of you, watch the one ahead of him and the one ahead of that one too.

These things are dynamic, they change instantly and damn near randomly, be ready for anything.

Someone else mentioned sightseeing, if that is what you want to do, let someone else drive who doesn't want to sightsee.

All of the things mentioned in this thread are portable, they apply to many other venues.
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Old 04-02-2010, 08:38 AM   #72
tigerboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
Look through the turn

LOOK THROUGH THE TURN

LOOK THROUGH THE TURN
Fixed:


                                                           Look through the turn

                                                   Look through the turn

                                            Look through the turn

                                   Look through the turn

                             Look through the turn

                      Look through the turn

               Look through the turn

       Look through the turn

    Look through the turn

      LOOK THRU THE TURN

             LOOK THRU THE @$!#$ TURN
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tigerboy screwed with this post 04-02-2010 at 08:44 AM
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Old 04-02-2010, 01:59 PM   #73
Midnightventure
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wizze
It's easier to see if somebody is moving towards you by watching where the tire meets the road. This works for vehicles at intersections, vehicles changing lanes, etc. The ones that bug me are the cagers that are "looking at you" but start rolling before they really oughta.
These bug me too. If they think they are going to get a jump their wrong because I always assume their coming and get on the brakes and they probably just ruined their chance to get out in traffic.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:10 PM   #74
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To me the most dangerous times to ride are dawn and dusk. In this area the deer come out and the sun is low which can blind drivers.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:23 PM   #75
DCrider
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Take a motorcycle riders safety course FIRST, unless you're too young and learning to ride on dirt, then tril and error like most of us?
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