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Old 04-03-2010, 12:09 PM   #76
dwoodward
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TURN YOUR HEAD
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ
LOOK THROUGH THE TURN
A lot of riders- new, old, in between, get lazy with the neck and just track the line with their eyes. If they get distracted, they have to work to reacquire the target. Turn your head so your nose points where you want to go, then if you glance away (was that a deer?) it's easy to pick up your line again.

Smoother is better.

Practice doesn't make perfect- practice makes permanent. Make the effort to practice what you want to happen when it goes to shit, so you do the right thing automatically.

Anticipate. Most people call this "ride like you're invisible / they're out to get you". Google up Hanlon's Razor.

Practice some more. Operating the bike needs to be as automatic as walking, so what you think about is what's going on around you.

Do some reading. David Hough is a good place to start. Lee Parks and a bunch of others when you've got a handle on that.

Generalize. Some people will offer advice about what to do for the one in a million thing. ("Never ride beside a semi because a tire might blow.") Back off a little and see what general category that fits into ("be aware of dangerous things beside you"), so it's the one in a thousand or one in a hundred. Learn to recognizethat and prepare for it, because that's a useful thing to have and you'll use it. Otherwise you're trying to remember all of the millions of things that can go to shit... you won't be able to make up your mind.

Did I mention practicing?
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Old 04-03-2010, 01:08 PM   #77
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I wish that someone had told me to first decide on what helmet, jacket, gloves, boots and pants to buy, and then, knowing the budget for riding gear, decide on what bike to buy. I was in shock when I found out what it was going to cost to outfit me for the level of protection I wanted. If I had less disposable income, it would have affected the amount that I could afford to spend on a bike. I wonder how many people buy the bike first, without a clear understanding of what the gear, motorcycle course and insurance are going to cost, and wind up short changing themselves on protection because they've spent just about all they have on the bike.

Having just gone through this, I can tell you that it is very easy to spend upwards of $3,000 on protective gear (if you buy new) and a course, with insurance on top of that.

redge screwed with this post 04-03-2010 at 04:57 PM
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Old 04-04-2010, 12:52 PM   #78
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About looking through the turn

Motorcycle lights aim where the chassis or the front wheel point, depending on how/where they are mounted. Where a turn is going is, by definition, somewhere else. This is why riding at night, outside of urbanations, is so dangerous, and feels so creepy; you cannot see through the turn and are just reacting to where you are instead of anticipating where you'll be. You're riding blind.

Well, except maybe a warm desert night under a bright full moon....


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Old 04-04-2010, 02:04 PM   #79
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Some More

Great thread.

This is for street riding.

Keep two fingers covering the brake and clutch.

Hold the bars like you are holding a bird in your hand. If you tense up the bike feels it.

If your behind a car at a red light don't be on the bumper of the car in front. Stay a bit behind and to the side. Keep an eye on your mirrors. If someone is coming up fast you can move around the car in front of you and let him hit that

Smooth is fast.

Just keep leaning, you make the curve, at the worst you'll low side, better than going into the trees head on.

If you go down push the bike away from you.

On the interstate don't ride the right lane. Idiots that aren't paying attention will say, wow thats my exit and cut across the lanes sometimes,and people getting on usually just pull on withoutlooking, figuring other drivers will make way

When raining don't ride in the middle of the lane. Thats where all the oil is.

Put weight on your inside peg when cornering.

Be careful when you pull off to the side of the road and keep wheel straight. If its soft or sandy its eassy to fall over.

Have fun.

Practise braking in an empty parking lot, and slow speed manuvers.

When turning tightly at low speeds lightly ride the rear brake.



Enjoy
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:09 PM   #80
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Ice

Your from Ohio so remember in the spring and fall to watch out for ice.

Power lines can tell you about upcoming corners.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:10 PM   #81
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At intersections with traffic lights stop on the line so that you trigger the sensor.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:13 PM   #82
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Go over the bike before you ride. Like someone else said check the tires,. Look to see if something is loose and fluid leaks.

Don't armour all the seat or tire sidewalls
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:14 PM   #83
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Keep the chain properly tensioned, clean and lubricated.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:16 PM   #84
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Don't ride away with your XLCH rear wheel still chained to the motel railing. People will howl with laughter! Happened to a friend at Laconia, 1980.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:21 PM   #85
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No passengers while your learning.

When you do have a passenger.

Tell them that they are not to get on or off the bike until you tell them. Tell them to lean with you and not against you.

That they are not to be jumping around.

Make sure they have gear on too.

The bike is going to react differently with their added weight.

A good passenger is hard to find, but a pleasure to ride with.

If their helmet keeps bouncing off yours you are not riding smoothly.

A piece of black electrical tape at the top of the visor helps block the sun when the sun is low in the sky.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:28 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbrsddn
Don't ride away with your XLCH rear wheel still chained to the motel railing. People will howl with laughter! Happened to a friend at Laconia, 1980.



Reminds me when I took off with the disc lock still on.

Expensive lesson. Most of mine have been expensive but I do remember them

If you use a disc lock run a string or something else to the handlebars so you don't forget it.

A small piece of aluminum or plastic to put under your side stand. In the dirt the sidestand will sink, and it will on hot pavement. Ypu can buy one or make your own. Drill a hole thru it, run string thru it and wrap around handgrip. That way when you take the bike off the stand you can give it a tug without bending over, and your less likely to forget it. Use neon string. You don't want to take off with it, it could get caught in the chain.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:31 PM   #87
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Look out for where dirt roads meet pavement, cars and truck track gravel onto the hottop.

If you smell cowshit look out for it on the road. Farmers spread manure on their fields and when they pull onto the road they track mud onto the road.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:33 PM   #88
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If one deer or turkey cross the road in front of you there will be others following behind them. Don't look at the pretty deer crossing the road, look for the other one getting ready to cross.

If you see a dog running out to ya, slow down a bit then speed up, it frigs up their timing.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:34 PM   #89
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STUPID HURTS!!!!!!!
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:37 PM   #90
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Take a course
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