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Old 12-30-2010, 04:31 PM   #1696
kirkster70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inane Cathode View Post
Is there a trick to getting seamless welds (like around an exhaust fitting) with flux core mig? I can't for the life of me either a) get a good leak proof weld all the way around or b) get a seamless weld and not blow through it like its not even there.
Does your machine accept gas? If so, you may try switching from flux core to solid wire and shielding gas. You will have much less spatter and a more attractive weld bead.

You will need Argon/CO2 for mild steel, or Tri-mix gas for stainless.

Also, if doing exhaust work with existing tubing, make sure all the chrome is ground off the tubing, otherwise you will have impurities in the weld which will also cause the bead to not look the greatest.

I'm no expert, but I've discovered that on very thin materials it's best to lay a series of tack welds upon one another similar to the TIG welding process. I just did some 18 ga. mild steel using this method, and it turned out great.

edit - another thing I was just thinking of...too large of an arc length (the distance from the end of your torch to the welded surface) will also cause excess spatter.

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Old 12-30-2010, 10:32 PM   #1697
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Broken shock mount on a R1100GS frame - what's the best solution?

So guys I have a broken R1100GS shock mount on the rear subframe and stranded in Nairobi (read Nairobbery) in Kenya.




















This part takes extreme abuse under 2up fully loaded bike on very bad roads and trails.

Any idea if there's any point bending it back together and welding it or will doing this just make it weaker and I'll have the same problem soon again? There's not much space to reinforce it - bottom recession needs space for shock movement, upper part is with seat mounts attached.

Or it's better to cut the complete mounting part off and CNC a brand new one - stronger than original? Cutting it out is quite complicated as you can see, so it'll be a risky business as well.

There's one CNC place here and some sorts of weldings are also possible.

Any idas, thoughts are highly apreciated since I'm currently a stranded traveller because of this.

Happy new year,
Margus
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Old 12-31-2010, 06:22 AM   #1698
WIsixfitty
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Originally Posted by kellyk7 View Post
I have been given a stainless mid pipe from a GSXR with carbon fiber Can that I want to put on my BWM F650 DAK I figure I can cut the Mid Pipe and then Cut the back section of the DAK pipe and weld the two together (or maybe have somebody do it)

I have a simple Lincoln AC buzz box for a welder

Questions are:

Can I use what I have to weld this pipe?

If So what rods would be recommended? I have no clue what type stainless this would be 300 / 400 series ect ?

If I can do this what would the recommended methods be?

Since the exhaust tube is a thin wall your dick (stick) welder is just about useless unless you want a crappy looking, leaking and weak welds.

imo your only option would be to find someone to tig weld it. 300 or 400 sereis won't matter much as the welder will still use 308l filler.




Quote:
Originally Posted by tsiklonaut View Post
So guys I have a broken R1100GS shock mount on the rear subframe and stranded in Nairobi (read Nairobbery) in Kenya.


This part takes extreme abuse under 2up fully loaded bike on very bad roads and trails.

Any idea if there's any point bending it back together and welding it or will doing this just make it weaker and I'll have the same problem soon again? There's not much space to reinforce it - bottom recession needs space for shock movement, upper part is with seat mounts attached.

Or it's better to cut the complete mounting part off and CNC a brand new one - stronger than original? Cutting it out is quite complicated as you can see, so it'll be a risky business as well.

There's one CNC place here and some sorts of weldings are also possible.

Any idas, thoughts are highly apreciated since I'm currently a stranded traveller because of this.

Happy new year,
Margus

I would reinforce and modify the existing on the seat side then cut away the seat to fit. Sacrifice a small chunk of the seat for the most important part, the frame.
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Old 12-31-2010, 12:04 PM   #1699
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsiklonaut View Post


Any idea if there's any point bending it back together and welding it or will doing this just make it weaker and I'll have the same problem soon again? There's not much space to reinforce it - bottom recession needs space for shock movement, upper part is with seat mounts attached.

Or it's better to cut the complete mounting part off and CNC a brand new one - stronger than original? Cutting it out is quite complicated as you can see, so it'll be a risky business as well.

There's one CNC place here and some sorts of weldings are also possible.

Any idas, thoughts are highly apreciated since I'm currently a stranded traveller because of this.

Happy new year,
Margus

Welded correctly it will be as strong as it was before it was broken. I think I would opt for straightening and bracing as best you can and then get a good weld on it.
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Old 12-31-2010, 05:55 PM   #1700
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Originally Posted by perterra View Post
Welded correctly it will be as strong as it was before it was broken. I think I would opt for straightening and bracing as best you can and then get a good weld on it.
I personally would straighten it, then weld it, then attempt to brace it the best you can. I don't think that this type of part would be a good CNC'ed part.
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Old 12-31-2010, 06:05 PM   #1701
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Take it to a welding shop. they should be able to make the repair. Any attempt to make this part stronger will only result in the next weakest link failing.
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Old 12-31-2010, 08:34 PM   #1702
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+1 on welding the cracked upper shock mount. Depending on access, you may have to cut off the seat mount bracket, make the weld to the shock tower, then reweld the seat mount bracket.

All the subframe material is low carbon (aka: mild) steel, it isn't hardened. It can't be be hardened because of the low carbon content. The heat from welding will not change its strength.



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Old 01-02-2011, 08:16 PM   #1703
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsiklonaut View Post

Any idas, thoughts are highly apreciated since I'm currently a stranded traveller because of this.

Happy new year,
Margus

i would put a lettle bevel on both edges of the break than bend it back into place and weld it. than grind the weld down close to flush, and take a peice of strap (3/4 x 1/8 or something like that) and lay it over the weld, like you are puting a back up plate on it. but you are not working on a flat surface so you are going to have to tack one end and heat hammer bend and weld the strap into form, i have heard this called fish plating
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Old 01-08-2011, 01:24 PM   #1704
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I'm making my own steel shoe for flat track racing. I have a hard surface rod thats applied with a torch. Its not a flux core rod. I'm guessing this is like brazing and I need some form of flux. Thanks for any help.
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Old 01-08-2011, 05:25 PM   #1705
perterra
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Originally Posted by skrub View Post
I'm making my own steel shoe for flat track racing. I have a hard surface rod thats applied with a torch. Its not a flux core rod. I'm guessing this is like brazing and I need some form of flux. Thanks for any help.

This may sound dumb but some of those rectangular and square bare rods are put on with an electric welder. They treat it like a stick electrode.
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Old 01-08-2011, 05:35 PM   #1706
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are you sure about that?
I do a lot of cast iron repair and the cast filler rod I get for gas welding, (with a flux), is square in cross section. You can buy fluxes from your local supplier or you can make your own from anhydrous borax, silica sand and iron filings can be thrown into the mix as well. I use this last blend for forge welding, (hammer and anvil and a coal fire).

E
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Old 01-08-2011, 05:43 PM   #1707
perterra
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Originally Posted by FHG1382 View Post
are you sure about that?
I do a lot of cast iron repair and the cast filler rod I get for gas welding, (with a flux), is square in cross section. You can buy fluxes from your local supplier or you can make your own from anhydrous borax, silica sand and iron filings can be thrown into the mix as well. I use this last blend for forge welding, (hammer and anvil and a coal fire).

E
Yeah, I witnessed it being done. Big amps 500+ and AC current but it layed down a bead of hard surface. Huge amounts of spatter but as the factory rep told me, spatter is fine if it also restricts wear. These were on the bottoms of buckets, welding large beads in a waffle pattern where the steel and slag they were moving would pack in to the waffles and work as abrasion resistant it's self.

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Old 01-08-2011, 05:49 PM   #1708
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FHG1382 View Post
are you sure about that?
I do a lot of cast iron repair and the cast filler rod I get for gas welding, (with a flux), is square in cross section. You can buy fluxes from your local supplier or you can make your own from anhydrous borax, silica sand and iron filings can be thrown into the mix as well. I use this last blend for forge welding, (hammer and anvil and a coal fire).

E
Do you have an electric welding machine capable of DC welding current? If you do try some 'Avista' (sp?) rod.
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Old 01-08-2011, 05:52 PM   #1709
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Originally Posted by road ranger View Post
Do you have an electric welding machine capable of DC welding current? If you do try some 'Avista' (sp?) rod.

Avesta, they make or package about 20 different alloys; it will require machining likely if you get to the mating surface if you weld it with stick electrode.
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Old 01-08-2011, 06:51 PM   #1710
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I got the rods from Cody racing. Thay list them 15.00 ea. My local supply house could only order 10# at 600 bucks. I only need two to cover one shoe. Thay are listed by Stoody for use with a gas torch. The bottom of a shoe definitely looks like its done with a torch, all puddles and irregular. The rods are bare and round
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