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Old 05-09-2011, 09:45 PM   #16
btcn
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Originally Posted by Tacoma View Post
I will wait for the 750cc Tmax, my current Tmax is already a 750 -3 cyl, but 1 cyl is a dummy cyl used only for balance, all Yamaha has to do is add a piston, connecting rod, the crank is already set up.
I am surprized no current Tmax owner hasn't done it yet!
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:01 AM   #17
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I think BMW has the resources to ensure that the Drop-down Floor in rear storage can only operate when parked. Its quite easy to hook features into ignition circuit management. How common is the sidestand-ignition switch on motor scooters?

If nothing else, a BMW offering may push Suzuki to improve the Burg. Following on is a personal list of possible improvements . . . but it may be that BMW worked out something similar for themselves? (BMW had access to a Burg long term to assist them in their design brief).

My list on how to improve the Burg-
A real, usable, neutral drive position. (Its a pain lifting the Exec onto the centrestand on indifferent terrain; particularly with the trailer attached.)

Weight-reduction (or addition of a Reverse Gear).

Dryer dashboard when its raining. Very difficult to read instruments in the rain.

Better Windscreen. (With a price this high; why should one need to go aftermarket?)

A fuel gauge that indicates distance remaining when down to last segment. Yamaha gives the rider a count-up reading at this point.

Having Odometer AND Trip Meter visible together (instead of sequential). If Yamaha can do this; why not Suzuki?

Option of less-direct throttle-response.

A fourth threaded mounting hole, rearwards from existing passenger-backrest trio, to better support the mounting of a topbox.

Suspension upgrade. Currently the TMax gives a much better ride than the Burg.

Momentary-on illumination for hand switches.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:01 AM   #18
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:51 AM   #19
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I'm thinking that btcn is wondering how Tacoma possibly thinks anyone privately could make the horizontally-opposed reciprocating balancer inside Yamaha's TMax into a working cylinder?



2001 European Model Yamaha "TMAX"
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Liquid-cooled DOHC twin with horizontally-opposed reciprocating balancer
The newly developed lightweight, compact-design liquid-cooled 4-stroke DOHC parallel twin 8-valve 499cc engine adopted on this model has a 360-degree crank moment and plated cylinders. It has a bore x stroke of 66mm x 73mm, a 10.1:1 compression ratio, has a max. power output of 29.4 kW (40PS) and develops a max. torque of 45.8N-m (4.67kgf-m).
This engine is characterized by its compact design resulting in a slim overall width and features a horizontally-opposed reciprocating balancer with aluminum piston positioned opposite the crank shaft to greatly reduce vibration. This innovative new-design Yamaha reciprocating balancer concentrates its moving parts as low as possible in the unit to make optimum use of space, while at the same time effectively using primary inertial force to cancel out the secondary inertial force
As I see it; the reciprocating balancer sits between crankshaft & drive transfer shaft where there is little chance of adding a water-jacket, combustion chamber with spark plug; and certainly not another DOHC assembly.

But if one could do all that, there remains the problem of beefing-up CVT, Transmission Transfer Shaft, and the Final Drive to pass-on more power to rear wheel.

These complex modifications are more do-able for the factory than for some owner inside his carport.
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Old 05-10-2011, 05:48 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by vortexau View Post
I'm thinking that btcn is wondering how Tacoma possibly thinks anyone privately could make the horizontally-opposed reciprocating balancer inside Yamaha's TMax into a working cylinder?



2001 European Model Yamaha "TMAX"
As I see it; the reciprocating balancer sits between crankshaft & drive transfer shaft where there is little chance of adding a water-jacket, combustion chamber with spark plug; and certainly not another DOHC assembly.

But if one could do all that, there remains the problem of beefing-up CVT, Transmission Transfer Shaft, and the Final Drive to pass-on more power to rear wheel.

These complex modifications are more do-able for the factory than for some owner inside his carport.
I was actally wondering why the hell theres a whole nother cylinder just for balance and if there actually was.

Just seems like a huge waste of power and space. It doesn't actually have a moving powerless piston does it?

If so they couldn't come up with another way to balance the engine?
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:28 AM   #21
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I was actally wondering why the hell theres a whole nother cylinder just for balance and if there actually was.

Just seems like a huge waste of power and space. It doesn't actually have a moving powerless piston does it?
I doubt that Yamaha's system wastes very much power, but then, ALL motor balancing systems use moving mass and so, take a little bit of HP when the engine's speed changes. Would YOU prefer the vibrations of an un-balanced motor?

Going by that diagram, its not really "wasting space" as its stuck in the middle of other components.

There is (as you call it) "a moving powerless piston" running from a third crank throw in opposition to the forward twin-cylinders.
Quote:
If so they couldn't come up with another way to balance the engine?
You have to be talking with the Yamaha engineers on that point.

My take is that its quite a good way to balance a horizontal parallel twin engine. The Flat-Four (VW, Subaru, and early Goldwings) is usually a very smooth, vibration-free engine design.

A boxer twin can be fairly smooth but fore & aft cylinder mounting usually requires the barrels be higher than the transmission or the whole assembly may be just too long:

1914 ABC motorcycle.


1920s Douglas.


Helios powered by BMW M2B15 engine (1920-21).
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:25 PM   #22
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I doubt that Yamaha's system wastes very much power, but then, ALL motor balancing systems use moving mass and so, take a little bit of HP when the engine's speed changes. Would YOU prefer the vibrations of an un-balanced motor?

Going by that diagram, its not really "wasting space" as its stuck in the middle of other components.

There is (as you call it) "a moving powerless piston" running from a third crank throw in opposition to the forward twin-cylinders.
You have to be talking with the Yamaha engineers on that point.

My take is that its quite a good way to balance a horizontal parallel twin engine. The Flat-Four (VW, Subaru, and early Goldwings) is usually a very smooth, vibration-free engine design.

A boxer twin can be fairly smooth but fore & aft cylinder mounting usually requires the barrels be higher than the transmission or the whole assembly may be just too long:

1914 ABC motorcycle.


1920s Douglas.


Helios powered by BMW M2B15 engine (1920-21).

It just seems a little wasteful to me. I guess it works great, and if so its not a big deal.

It just seems to me they could have done something else. The Burgman 650 is also a parallel twin and it doesn't have a dummy cylinder for balance.

I wouldn't want an unbalanced motor. But a little imbalance is ok with me.

But what ever works for them, I know Yamaha engineers aren't stupid and I'm sure they have some good reason for it.
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