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Old 05-11-2011, 06:30 PM   #16
LarryRickenbacker
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Ride Safe and enjoy.

Howdy,

MN Disco1: I was in your shoes 4 years ago. I'd never ridden a motorbike before and I was fortysomething. I settled on a 125cc scooter, which brought some excitement and fun to errand-running and commuting.
I have a Honda Sh150i now and enjoy re-fueling! I tend to use my scoot as more of a M-F commuter/errand bike, but we're going to get along just fine.
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Old 05-11-2011, 06:35 PM   #17
THE_SHRUB
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If your looking into your first scooter, I would suggest looking at a good 125-150cc scoot. Its good for getting a feel for everything from backroad riding, to urban downtown traffic. Not too big, not too small. Just remember that it IS highway legal, but not recommended AT ALL!!

I just started riding, and I'm on a 1985 Honda elite 150 and I find it suits my needs / riding style very well. If your in the market for a used scoot to start off with , the elite 150 is a good place to start looking. And If your looking for a new model, good luck narrowing your options down, because theres a LARGE variety available these days.
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Old 05-12-2011, 04:51 AM   #18
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Thanks for all the replies...

I appreciate the comments, especially about motives for riding. I guess I can remember wanting a motorcycle from the time I could pick out my bigwheel as a kid. I was a bigwheel made to look like a Kawasaki dirtbike. My parents HATE motorcycles so I guess I did not have one...

31 years later... I think I would like to learn something new. It seems there is a great opportunity for fun /enjoyment and risk. However, it does seem like there are alot of ways to mitigate the risks. It seems most riders do not take the steps to reduce risks...
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Old 05-12-2011, 06:16 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tacoma View Post
Some people the excitemnt wears off after owning one, some people own a bike just to show it off, or to impress others, don't buy it for those reasons, buy it for you, to impress you.
Thats what I tell everybody, when someone asks me why did I buy my scooter for, I tell them "To impress me,, not you"
Listen, we've all heard your impressions of your scoot, etc, and you are crapping up the forum, cut it the hell out! You sound like a broken record, and a fair amount of us are probably sick of it. It's too bad you seem to have issues in your area with riders and locals, that sucks, but leave it at the door to what ever room you have your computer in, jeeze. You either have to switch your ride, or you are a troll, in which case, good job in getting me to bite.

Content: As long as you don't buy a mainland China built scoot from an off brand (Some major brands do have their lower end stuff built on the mainland, and they are okay, but not as good as the stuff from Taiwan,) you'll be fine. 125-150 CCs is a good range, Elite 150s are damn near bullet proof, and usually decently priced. I'm thinking about an Elite 250 that is near (and by near I mean within 400 Km) from me for around $800 Cnd. Might need some carb cleaning, but all the plastic is there.
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Old 05-12-2011, 06:51 AM   #20
klaviator
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Disco1 View Post
I appreciate the comments, especially about motives for riding. I guess I can remember wanting a motorcycle from the time I could pick out my bigwheel as a kid. I was a bigwheel made to look like a Kawasaki dirtbike. My parents HATE motorcycles so I guess I did not have one...

31 years later... I think I would like to learn something new. It seems there is a great opportunity for fun /enjoyment and risk. However, it does seem like there are alot of ways to mitigate the risks. It seems most riders do not take the steps to reduce risks...
You are exactly correct. Riding is a lot safer if you do it correctly and mitigate the risks. First, and probably most importantly, learn how to ride. After you learn the basics, keep learning and improving. Try to become an excellent rider, not just one who is "good enough"

Second, use some common sense. No riding while drunk, riding 100 through a school zone or other stupid stuff. Do these things and you may never have an accident. There are a few people out there like hexnut who have been riding a long time with no crashes.

Third, don't assume you will be one of those who never crashes. Get some decent riding gear. I have seen a lot of crashes and the vast majority of the time, those who crashed while properly dressed walked away.

Last. Go out, get a scooter and enjoy the ride.
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Old 05-12-2011, 07:39 AM   #21
hexnut
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Originally Posted by klaviator View Post
You are exactly correct. Riding is a lot safer if you do it correctly and mitigate the risks. First, and probably most importantly, learn how to ride. After you learn the basics, keep learning and improving. Try to become an excellent rider, not just one who is "good enough"

Second, use some common sense. No riding while drunk, riding 100 through a school zone or other stupid stuff. Do these things and you may never have an accident. There are a few people out there like hexnut who have been riding a long time with no crashes.

Third, don't assume you will be one of those who never crashes. Get some decent riding gear. I have seen a lot of crashes and the vast majority of the time, those who crashed while properly dressed walked away.

Last. Go out, get a scooter and enjoy the ride.
Yeah, I am just lucky. I make some of that luck as well. Just yesterday a woman in a Nissan pickup running beside me just decided she wanted in my lane so she just moved over in it. Did not look or anything. Of course I am ALWAYS aware of my surroundings at all times and just moved over on the shoulder then accelerated in front of her with a few hand jesters.

Back when I did much of my motorcycle riding there were no cell phones. Today people on cell phones will not see a scooter so you have got to watch them and be ready to take an alternate route. I especially watch the ones turning left. I had one a while back turn left in front of me and she was looking right at me. We had eye contact. It was like I had no right to be there. I lost my religion over that one.

And it don't hurt to get good equipment ie helmet and other riding gear that you feel is necessary. I am old school and use what I can get by with but thats just me.
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Old 05-12-2011, 08:14 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hexnut View Post
And it don't hurt to get good equipment ie helmet and other riding gear that you feel is necessary. I am old school and use what I can get by with but thats just me.
With online dealers like Motorcyclegear.com etc there really isn't much of an argument about not being able to swing the minimum for safety gear now. Hell you can get flip up helmets, textile gear, and cheap boots there. That having been said, it is a good idea to support your local shops as much as you can for service and all that jazz.
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Old 05-12-2011, 05:19 PM   #23
btcn
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Yes just use common sense. I agree on assuming all the other cars are trying to hit you and always look both ways before going through a green light.

About 40-50% of motorcycle accidents are self inducted by guys that have no business being on a, overly confident riders, etc. Most of them are also single vehicle accidents.

I'd say the rest are caused by mainly negligent idiotic cagers, and mother nature [Obstructions like animals on a dark country road, road conditions, etc]. Seriously, if they'd make you take an IQ test before testing for your license countless driver's AND rider's lives would be saved!

BUT those caused by cagers may not be the rider's fault, but that doesn't mean they couldn't have been avoided. Some accidents, well you CAN'T avoid them. But just those extra little things like looking both ways before approaching an intersection make can make all the difference.


But you seem to have a good attitude. You understand the risks of riding, but know that you can avoid a lot of them by smart decisions like taking the safety course.

When it comes to scoots just keep looking and find what suits you well.

If you could give us a few more ideas to what you want, we can help you narrow it down. Also take into consideration little things you may want to do in the future like little trips and other rides so you will be more satisfied with the scoot or bike.

Dual Sports are good motorcycles. Easy to ride, nice torque curves for learning to ride, and fun. They perform pretty close to scooters other than a bit more offroad capabilities on some models.

And the Elite 150-250s are great scooters. Basically almost all of them WILL initially need a little wrenching and replacements or they will be unreliable. But you will learn a great deal from it as I have. Parts for the 150 are VERY widely available from Babbits and Ebay. There is also a lot of support for them. There are lots of experts on them on here and I can help you out a lot with the Elites! I've done major work on mine, including replacing and rebuilding the engine, minor parts that you'll need to replace, etc. You mentioned you wanted a little wrenching, well these are cheap and easy to work on. If your up for a bit of wrenching and ending up with a damn reliable scooter, well look on Craigslist for an Elite 150-250.
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