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Old 07-25-2011, 01:50 PM   #61
awonderfulworld
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I just rode to/from the BMWMOA meet in Bloomsburg PA last weekend - 1400kms - in a 'stich onesie. Rode with the stich, boots, full face helmet behind an aeroflow on my GS and... I didn't mind it at all. It was 38c plus humidity when I was riding.

It sucked when I stopped, but moving I was perfectly fine. I actually found it more comfortable than my old Olympia AST/Ranger combo. Keep the zips open and it's comfortable.

Did I sweat? Yes. But constant hydration from a water bladder in the tank bag solved the lost fluids. You take in a lot of water/gatorade (I alternated). I refill the 2L bladder at every gas stop. Shorts and a wicking tshirt are key as well to keep your temp in check.
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Old 07-25-2011, 03:22 PM   #62
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Old 07-25-2011, 03:26 PM   #63
njd
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If it's too hot for you to ride in all mesh gear then it's just too hot for you to be riding.

The only time I feel hotter when wearing my mesh jacket and pants is when I'm not moving. Otherwise I'm fine.
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Old 07-26-2011, 09:10 AM   #64
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This thread is very timely for me. I never ride without a jacket, boots, gloves and FF helmet. I almost never ride without all of that and mesh pants. But this past weekend I went to the vintage bike races at mid-Ohio and it was in the mid-90's temp wise and probably that humidity wise. It was miserable. I left the pants at camp when my friends and I headed out for a ride in the country. I didn't go 2 miles before I ditched the jacket as well. It felt great riding in jeans and a t-shirt. Considering Ohio has not helmet law and it seems most bikers there do without, I still felt over dressed.

I am 99% ATGATT, but sometimes it is either stay home or ride with less gear. I don't like doing it, but in this case I had to. For riding from mid-Ohio back down to Marietta the day before going home, I wet my t-shirt down under my jacket and that worked pretty well.
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:03 AM   #65
cliffy109
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Last year in the middle of August, it was 95 and humid. I wore my Olympia mesh pants and jacket, plus my BMW All-around boots, full face helmet and BMW Summer gloves. On my ride home from work, while in a sharp corner at 60 mph, a kid pulled out in front of me, sending me tumbling off the road and into the woods. The bike landed straight across my back.

Every piece of my armor took a hit. Shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, foot, hand and head all has scuff marks where the road, the gravel shoulder and the woods had scraped against me. I didn't "walk" away but I didn't have a single broken bone nor a single scratch on my body. The only blood was from the ambulance crew that had a hard time starting an IV. The only real injury was 3 compression fractures in my spine, for which I spent 3 days in the hospital.

Without all the gear, I would have had a snapped spine. I likely would have broken my shoulder and hip and probably my knee. At the very least, I would have been rashed all over my left side. My face would be sausage.

Gear isn't comfortable. Its comforting. Mesh gear in the summer is a requirement for me. I'm looking into phase change vests to help keep me cool, but leaving gear off is not an option.
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:15 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffy109 View Post
Last year in the middle of August, it was 95 and humid. I wore my Olympia mesh pants and jacket, plus my BMW All-around boots, full face helmet and BMW Summer gloves. On my ride home from work, while in a sharp corner at 60 mph, a kid pulled out in front of me, sending me tumbling off the road and into the woods. The bike landed straight across my back.

Every piece of my armor took a hit. Shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, foot, hand and head all has scuff marks where the road, the gravel shoulder and the woods had scraped against me. I didn't "walk" away but I didn't have a single broken bone nor a single scratch on my body. The only blood was from the ambulance crew that had a hard time starting an IV. The only real injury was 3 compression fractures in my spine, for which I spent 3 days in the hospital.

Without all the gear, I would have had a snapped spine. I likely would have broken my shoulder and hip and probably my knee. At the very least, I would have been rashed all over my left side. My face would be sausage.

Gear isn't comfortable. Its comforting. Mesh gear in the summer is a requirement for me. I'm looking into phase change vests to help keep me cool, but leaving gear off is not an option.

Wow, that's pretty impressive. The sort of thing that might have gotten you some freebies if you documented it up real nice with pictures.

I can't imagine many back protectors saving you from a bike landing on your back - just wow.
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:34 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
Wow, that's pretty impressive. The sort of thing that might have gotten you some freebies if you documented it up real nice with pictures.

I can't imagine many back protectors saving you from a bike landing on your back - just wow.
Pics? Documentation you say? All here: http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...highlight=back

My wife hates the pic of me laying next to the bike. She wishes I would just delete that one. I kind of like it. It reminds me of why I am ATGATT. The guy that took the pic was the driver and he lifted the bike off my back.

Maybe I'll send a link to Olympia. I sure wouldn't mind a new set of pants.
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:42 AM   #68
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vented & armored jacket, Klim Dakar pants, Tech 2 mid boots, MX gloves, Nolan Modular helmet.
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Old 07-26-2011, 12:17 PM   #69
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FWIW..I'll be doing a street ride to the Catskills(NY) here in the near future. I own Tecknic over pants, Fieldsheer textile pants( not sure which model) and Thor Ride pants for dual sporting. Although this is street ride, I'll be wearing the Thor Ride pants. They are waterproof, yet have venting*, and are made of the same fabrics most street textile pants are. Added bonus, they have actual pockets.

* I have never opened the vents for dirt riding, since we are always going through puddles and what not. I am optimistic they will do a great job keeping my legs cool while riding.

I'll be wearing my Alpine Stars Free Ride padded shorts as well as Thor shin/knee guards underneath them....just like I do when dirt/dual sport riding.
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:26 PM   #70
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Or you could do what this guy did.....Think Borat.
http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/ktv...,6312405.story

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Old 07-26-2011, 04:37 PM   #71
levain
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Mesh doesn't work for me, and I'm surprised it does for so many folks. I've never been so hot than the time I rode to Atlanta in a full mesh Motoport getup. Miserable was just the beginning. I could feel every bit of the heat from the bike and asphalt. Add to that the feeling of riding through a blow dryer and I guess mesh just doesn't work for me. I couldn't keep my camelbak full enough.

I decided to give mesh pants another try a month or so ago and left on a 4 day 2000 miler in mid 90's heat. I was miserable. Mesh? Never again for me.
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Old 07-26-2011, 10:07 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudmullet View Post
I agree. You'll never see it coming until you realize that you were looking for the wrong signals. It helps to be acclimated to the heat. Ninety degrees in March is much different than ninety degrees in September. Get outside more often. Walk around the neighborhood; mow the lawn; dig a ditch--exercise in the sun according to your level.
So much this. I live in Sacramento. When I moved here from Seattle in July 2008, I thought I was going to die of heatstroke on my 15-minute commute in a JR Atomic (solid but vented and light) jacket, Carhartt pants, hiking boots and FF helmet. I think it was 95 that day, which is 2 above normal.

I immediately bought a mesh jacket. After living here 3 years, I'm used to the heat. I use the mesh jacket for offroad riding where I'm not moving much, but I really only commute in it when it's REALLY hot, and I never wear it for long rides anymore.

But, I'm that guy that mows the lawn in jeans at 5pm on a 105 day, and the last time my A/C was on was over two years ago when people were visiting from cooler places. The human body is surprisingly adaptable, and you get used to the heat relatively quickly if you're not constantly running from A/C to A/C.

Quote:
Originally Posted by twigg View Post
Once the air temperature rises above around 95F, the breeze is not cooling your body, it's heating it, and the faster and farther you ride, the worse it gets.

This heating will dehydrate you to the point of heatstroke very rapidly, and it sneaks up on you.

If you can keep moving, you can cross Death Valley in the summer in relative comfort. Without covering up you can barely cross town.

If it's just too hot to take these precautions, then it's probably too hot to be out on a motorcycle.

just my 2c
You're right on the money.... here comes the science

The reason sweating works to cool the body is not simply because sweat is warm but because evaporating water uses a large amount of heat to change phase. If this weren't the case, people would die of heatstroke just standing around any time the temperature got much over 100.

To raise one gram of liquid water from 0C to 100C takes 100 calories (small c, the heat unit, i.e. 1cal=4.18J). To evaporate that same gram of water, turning it from 100C liquid water into 100C water vapor takes 539cal, and you haven't changed the temperature a bit.

If that water is touching your skin when it becomes water vapor, it absorbs a fair amount of that heat from the skin, helping your body stay cool. If liquid water/sweat gets blown off your body as a mist, it absorbs all the energy for the phase change from the atmosphere and does essentially nothing to cool your body.

When you wear a "rapid wicking" t-shirt on a very hot day (say 105F/40C) while riding, especially in a dry climate, your sweat gets wicked and then blown off your skin to evaporate on the shirt or in the breeze. Same goes for that t-shirt under a mesh jacket as the wind flows freely through. Put a vented, solid jacket on with a heavier but tightly-fitting cotton t-shirt (extra points for long sleeves) and you get soaked in sweat, but all that water is evaporating while touching your skin, and it cools your body far more than it would just getting blown away.

If all that sweat is blowing away without cooling your body, the body's natural reaction is to sweat more. All that extra sweat still blows away and now you're really farked: you can't keep your temperature down and you're blasting precious water into the atmosphere.

That's why riding on a really hot day in just a t-shirt feels awesome as your clothes dry out after sitting at a stoplight, but at 70mph on the slab (once your clothes are dry) it feels like you're a loaf of bread in an oven and you get thirsty in no time flat.

As the billboards here say, "Agua, sombra, descanso. Sin ellos no se puede trabajar." (Water, shade, rest. Without them you can't work).
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Old 07-27-2011, 06:11 AM   #73
cliffy109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Mesh doesn't work for me, and I'm surprised it does for so many folks. I've never been so hot than the time I rode to Atlanta in a full mesh Motoport getup. Miserable was just the beginning. I could feel every bit of the heat from the bike and asphalt. Add to that the feeling of riding through a blow dryer and I guess mesh just doesn't work for me. I couldn't keep my camelbak full enough.

I decided to give mesh pants another try a month or so ago and left on a 4 day 2000 miler in mid 90's heat. I was miserable. Mesh? Never again for me.
I have heard more than one long distance rider make the same comments about mesh. It seems mesh makes for a lot more evaporation which means a lot faster dehydration. Most LD riders seem to prefer vented gear, rather than mesh as it keeps out radiant heat and helps your body retain moisture better.

Shorter distance riders, like commuters, have very different needs. Dehydration isn't so much of a problem with a 1 hour commute. Drink up before you go and when you get home and you're GTG. Radiant heat isn't so big a deal on the right bike, with the right fairing either. Mesh is the only way I can tolerate my commute when the temps get into the upper 80's and in the mid-70's, its very pleasant. I don't ride like you do though and I think that's the main difference.
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Old 07-27-2011, 08:54 AM   #74
levain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffy109 View Post
I have heard more than one long distance rider make the same comments about mesh. It seems mesh makes for a lot more evaporation which means a lot faster dehydration. Most LD riders seem to prefer vented gear, rather than mesh as it keeps out radiant heat and helps your body retain moisture better.

Shorter distance riders, like commuters, have very different needs. Dehydration isn't so much of a problem with a 1 hour commute. Drink up before you go and when you get home and you're GTG. Radiant heat isn't so big a deal on the right bike, with the right fairing either. Mesh is the only way I can tolerate my commute when the temps get into the upper 80's and in the mid-70's, its very pleasant. I don't ride like you do though and I think that's the main difference.
Good points. It appears we're both "correct". Still, I find even locally that mesh rocks for around 10 miles, then it's the blow dryer thing all over again. As always YMMV, or to each his own
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Old 07-27-2011, 08:59 AM   #75
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Year round I wear a full R2P suit. I carry a bicycle water bottle in my tank bag. When I stop, or ever hour or so I will stop. Right before I start up again I will pour water into the open vents of the jacket and pants the roll on. Make sure you are too close to the person in front of you, or you will have mud. The evaporative cooling makes it cool for the first 30 minutes and then it is bearable for the next 30.

My 2c.
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