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Old 01-25-2012, 04:01 PM   #6271
tricepilot
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Originally Posted by WhiskeySmith View Post
Did the cerveza in the cooler survive?
First thing he checked
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Old 01-25-2012, 05:22 PM   #6272
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
We are here in Pto Escondido for tomorrow, a full day of off bike rest.
I missed a stop somewhere. Did you stop between San Miguel de Allende & Puerto Escondido?

Yer killin' me with the real time reports.

EDIT: Oops - missed the post about Oaxaca. One of my favorite places. I would have stayed there a couple of days.
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Old 01-25-2012, 06:12 PM   #6273
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Yer killin' me with the real time reports.
Clutching out at 7 am for San Cristobal. Friday into Guatemala.
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Old 01-25-2012, 06:20 PM   #6274
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She Lives!

Got the carb back together and stuffed into the KLR. Fired up and ran(finally). A short ride at 20 degrees suggests I am about ready for departure. A few things to tie up around here and I'm off! Probably SundAy at this point. Heading southwest from Michigan, crossng at Prisidio, TX and on to Chihuahua for my irst Mexican night. Then Creel and the Copper Canyon and then...wherever. Look for the beat KLR.
Via con Dios!
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Old 01-25-2012, 06:30 PM   #6275
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Glad to hear the tumble was not serious. Keep the rubber side DOWN
Actually I am surprised that you guys are still on the Pacific Coast ,. I thought that you were going to sort of beeline it down to Tikal .Apparently you got the extra week to play with ?. I was sort of expecting to see your group zoom by us today. Actually I have not seen a single solitary motorcycle tourist at all so far this entire run through Mexico.Pitiful!
We just spent a night in Pto Escondido this weekend . Temps sure beat what we had up in Coahuila a couple of weeks ago . Now spending a night in Coatzacoalcos... sorry Trice , I dont think Salma is visiting her hometown today
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Old 01-25-2012, 06:53 PM   #6276
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW Kurt View Post
Mike,


4. Continue on the MX 57 Libre to Matehuala.
5. In Matehuala take MX 61 to Doctor Arroyo.
6. In Doctor Arroyo take 88 towards Tula.
7. In Tula take 101 south. At the “T” turn towards Ciudad del Maiz.
8. Continue to Antiguo Morales.
9. In Antiguo Morales take MX 85 to Cd. Valles.
10. In Cd. Valles take MX 70 towards Tamuin to Ebano.
11. After Ebano take MX 105 through Panuco to Tempoal de Sanchez.
12. In Tempoal de Sanchez take MX 127 to El Alazan.
13. Take MX 130 towards Alamo and Tihuatlan.
14. Take MX 180 towards Vera Cruz. Stay on MX 180 all the way to Jaltiplan and La Venta.
15. In La Venta take the rural road towards Sanchez Magallanes.
Gracias!
Kurt, nothing wrong with any of the route you mention ,but just thought I d give you a heads up on Number 5
a couple of weeks ago on this trip I actually was going to take the road south out of DR Arroyo but decided against it after asking several Taxistas in Dr Arroyo about it. They all said that the pavement ends in Mier y Noriega some 40km south and that it is pretty tough , brecha , any farther. . I know my QUIMERA and old >PEMEX maps do show a line connecting south to some farther villages in the mountains but I have no idea what quality or ride time would be involved. Also don t know how much you like tough dirt roads , so you may want to investigate and certainly figure in enough daylight.
Instead of staying on 57 to Matehuala you could turn east at San Robertyo junction on to Mex 58 towardGaleana but then turn south on NL 61 all the way to Dr Arroyo. This is a very nice scenic high country route and you can take a side trip to Arramberi and the waterfalls park at Zaragoza (hotels at both)
Then at Dr A got o Matehuala and maybe visit Real de 14 Then south on 57 again to the Huizache junction and east on Mex 80.

At Cd del Maiz you can turn south on paved stateroad to Rayon and south to Pinihuan and join up with the road south to Jalpan in the Sierra Gorda. and Mex 120 junction.
If you insist on going east from Cd del Maiz you can turn south at Naranjos, another excellent scenic road . lot less traffic than Mex 85 and that will deposit you on Mex 70 eas to Cd Valles

Number 15 I cannot help with very much except to say that I chickened out on that one a few years ago. I started out from El Paraiso at the east end and discovered that the road, as they called it, turned into loose beach sand with palm fronds in the tire tracks.Not my idea of fun to drag a bike around sand in 35C temps. Also I think the west end of the barrier islands involve one or two ferrry crossings.
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Old 01-25-2012, 07:03 PM   #6277
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Trice-sorry to hear about the crashiones. Is 175 the better than 131? We've been told 131 is rough and avoid it like bird flu.. Oaxaca here we come.
It ten of one and a dicena of the other .Both highways have their own character , both have a nice selection of curves and scenery and both rise from the warm coast through a n interesting succession of plant covers . The only solution is ,of course, ride both of them ... at a modest speed. If you find some reallly delectable curves that are clean turn around a few times to zip through them once you have scouted the hazards.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:16 AM   #6278
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Sjoerd, if you are in Coatza are you coming north?
PM me if you are going to be in the Veracruz area, please and thanks.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:36 AM   #6279
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Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
Tengai, the Gulf Coast is fine. PM me if you want to meet up as I live here in Veracruz and have been for close to two decades but know the area since 1978.
You will miss some very good riding if you stick only to the coast highway. If you have to ride the coast highway
south of Tuxpan, I can show you the one good ride it offers which takes you to Roca Partida and Montepio the back way into Catemaco. The rest of the gulf coast highway is sheer boredom save for a half an hour in the Tuxtlas.

BMW Kurt, my suggestion is as above. Get off the coast highway. In fact, the route you are taking, Kurt, will put you close enough to some very good riding. Both of you guys should, at the very least, head inland from Vega De Alatorre to Colipa and then up to El Nueve and do the Misantla highway of the clouds to Naolinco and then back down to Xalapa and back to the coast. A little detour of about 4 hours that will give you only a little taste of what is available here in the mountains that are off the coast highway.

The single biggest mistake riders make coming through Veracruz is to take the coast highway number 180.
If you want maps and pics and routing, PM me. You have not ridden eastern Mexico until you ride the mountains on the Veracruz - Puebla border.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sjoerd Bakker View Post
Kurt, nothing wrong with any of the route you mention ,but just thought I d give you a heads up on Number 5
a couple of weeks ago on this trip I actually was going to take the road south out of DR Arroyo but decided against it after asking several Taxistas in Dr Arroyo about it. They all said that the pavement ends in Mier y Noriega some 40km south and that it is pretty tough , brecha , any farther. . I know my QUIMERA and old >PEMEX maps do show a line connecting south to some farther villages in the mountains but I have no idea what quality or ride time would be involved. Also don t know how much you like tough dirt roads , so you may want to investigate and certainly figure in enough daylight.
Instead of staying on 57 to Matehuala you could turn east at San Robertyo junction on to Mex 58 towardGaleana but then turn south on NL 61 all the way to Dr Arroyo. This is a very nice scenic high country route and you can take a side trip to Arramberi and the waterfalls park at Zaragoza (hotels at both)
Then at Dr A got o Matehuala and maybe visit Real de 14 Then south on 57 again to the Huizache junction and east on Mex 80.

At Cd del Maiz you can turn south on paved stateroad to Rayon and south to Pinihuan and join up with the road south to Jalpan in the Sierra Gorda. and Mex 120 junction.
If you insist on going east from Cd del Maiz you can turn south at Naranjos, another excellent scenic road . lot less traffic than Mex 85 and that will deposit you on Mex 70 eas to Cd Valles

Number 15 I cannot help with very much except to say that I chickened out on that one a few years ago. I started out from El Paraiso at the east end and discovered that the road, as they called it, turned into loose beach sand with palm fronds in the tire tracks.Not my idea of fun to drag a bike around sand in 35C temps. Also I think the west end of the barrier islands involve one or two ferrry crossings.
I can't tell you guys how much I appreciate you looking at this! As I said I am a Latin American Riding virgin and your current info is helping me plan A LOT! The maps I have are not great. My map of Panama shows the road from Meteti to Yaviza as unpaved and I have heard here that it was paved years ago. Oh well, when things don't go as meticulously planned that is when the adventure starts, right? You think I would learn. I rode to Alaska a few years ago and had EVERYTHING planned to the smallest detail. The plan started to to go to hell about the time I hit the Tennessee state line!

Again, thanks!!!
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Old 01-26-2012, 06:01 AM   #6280
MikeMike
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Kurt, if you need maps that are ok (the only really good maps of Mexico are aviation maps as all the others have some errors are Sjoed has pointed out) send me a PM, and I do have some aviation maps that are highly detailed if you want those.
The problem is that the Guia Roji includes roads that are being dreamed up and that do not exist at all. The aviation type maps are good for if you are doing some exploring off the beaten path. The best maps of Mexico I have ever seen were in Russian and were on an application for my smartphone. I have no idea how anyone got hold of those to put into a program but they were accurate.
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:50 AM   #6281
Sjoerd Bakker
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Kurt, check out Googlemaps .com, zoom in on your destination on the coast sand bar and then switch to the satelite photo image, you will see all the detail.
The sandbar route is worse than I expected . there is virtually no road , for a long stretch. You just have to get a boat across a bit of water and then navigate the track between the palm trees. Do you want to manhandle a heavy bike in sand with hot weather ? Me neither thats why i turned tail with my GS1100 ?
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:10 AM   #6282
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Here is what is the start of a ride guide to the area of central Veracruz and the extreme east of Puebla.

If you want maps, pictures, notes, etc... about a ride, PM me the corresponding number and I will email you a PDF file within a day or two (or 3 if I am busy riding). If you are seriously thinking about spending some time in the area and want to get to know it better, I can ride along with you on these routes if I have the time.

I always enjoy meeting up with riders coming through and getting them away from the devil's candy addiction to the Mex #180 coast highway, which for the most part, is as exciting as watching grass grow with one exception being the Tuxtlas and the other the baches, topes, and kamikaze Central Americans hauling 3 used cars, two loads of domestic appliances, and a Quetzal in a pear tree.

Here you go and all feedback is most welcome be it good, bad, or indifferent. Some of these rides are exceptionally good so make an effort when you are in the area to try to experience them.


Important note! If you want more offroad type stuff, contact Arte and Andres, some of their "Greenland" rides link up with a couple of these routes. So don't forget!


MOTORCYCLE TOURING CENTRAL VERACRUZ - EASTERN PUEBLA
A riders guide to roads and sites of interest 2012

List of Rides - All Are Paved Routes UNLESS NOTED as of February, 2012

1. Las Casitas, Veracruz to Teziutlan, Puebla (curve after curve after curve after curve after...)

2. Vega de Alatorre, Ver. to Naolinco, Ver. via Colipa (classic mountain riding and good food)

3. Naolinco, Ver. to Palma Sola, Ver. via Plan de las Hayas (watch for the "disappearing road" trick after Alto Lucero)

4. Perote, Ver. to Maztaloya and Los Humeros, Puebla (geothermal delights)

5. Perote, Ver. to La Cantona, Pue. (archaeological ruins rarely visited but very significant, these ruins need a new publicist!)

6. Quiahuiztlan, Ver. (archaeological ruins) and the town of La Villa Rica de la Veracruz, beach and dunes. (Where the conquest began).

7. Veracruz, Ver. to Perote, Ver. via Coatepec, Xico, Teocelo, and Ixhuacan de los Reyes, Ver. (The road less traveled to Perote).

8. Perote, Ver. to Huatusco, Ver. via Quimixtlan, Pue. (contains off road section of less than 20 kms. and you can make a side trip to where the H1N1 flu virus supposedly began)

9. Teocelo, Ver. to Guadalupe Victoria, Puebla via Saltillo La Fragua, Pue. (4 possible routes and ALL are very good).

10. Perote, Ver. to Teocelo, Ver. via Gonzalez Ortega, Maravillas, Saltillo La Fragua, Acocomotla, La Trinidad, Rafael Garcia, and Patlanalan, Pue.
(Mountain riding)

11. Xalapa, Ver. to Veracruz, Ver. via Coatepec, Jalcomulco, Ohuapan, Totutla, Manuel Gonzalez, Cameron, and Soledad de Doblado, Ver. (Including the newly paved stretch of 20kms of good curves)

12. Veracruz, Ver. to Cordoba, Fortin, Orizaba, Ver. via Paso del Macho, Ver. (Stop at the monument for the French Foreign Legion near the site of the Battle of Camerone).

13. Jalcomulco, Ver. to Cordoba, Fortin, Orizaba, Ver. via Huatusco, Ver.
(Extra points if you find where the ostriches, yes the ostriches, are hidden).

14. Xalapa, Ver. to the summit of the Cofre de Perote (this is a challenging high elevation ride not recommended to do without some prior planning and common sense and knowing your limits).

15. Cordoba, Ver. to Tequila, Ver. via Xoxocotla, Ver. (la "Sierra Fria") via Soledad Atzompa, Ver. (On the map but off the map).

16. Cordoba, Ver. to Zongolica, Ver. (la Sierra Zongolica classic and once you make the descent you'll know why)

17. Zongolica, Ver. to Cordoba, Ver. via 25kms of unpaved mountain road through the Sierra de Tlacuiloteca. (Watch for low flying birds of prey).

18. Cordoba, Ver. to "The Large Millimeter Telescope" at the top of the Sierra Negra, Pue. via Maltrata, Xuchi, Plan del Capulin and Texmalaquilla, Pue. (Contains high elevation maintained dirt road. This is another somewhat challenging high elevation ride that is not recommended without some prior planning and common sense. Free camping is available with no services and "check in/check out" with the local police is sometimes enforced but not a bad idea anyways).

19. Cordoba, Ver. to Ciudad Mendoza, Ver. via Tequila, Tlaquilpa, Xoxocotla, Atzompa, Ver. (end of route is different from #14 as it is via Atzompa and not Soledad Atzompa, Ver. Try to see if you can find "la cocinera", you'll be glad you did).

20. Veracruz, Ver. to Catemaco, Ver. via Roca Partida, Montepio, Sontecomapan, Ver. (contains very short maintained dirt road section through tropical forest near UNAM Biological Research Station, someone might even be available to give you an interesting talk about the biology of the region, some very knowledgeable people working there).

21. Veracruz, Ver. to Catemaco, Ver. via Los Tuxtlas, Ver. conventional lower elevation mountain route that follows Mex #180 "the coast highway".
(The one that everyone always does but they forget to buy cigars in San Andres Tuxtla and some "Chochogo" at the roadside stands).

22. Xalapa, Ver to Huatusco, Ver. via Quimixtlan, Puebla a great ride that includes a back view of Pico de Orizaba and a long gravel stretch that can be done on a GS1200 if the rider has some offroad experience. (It's a bone shaker but if you get it on a clear day you won't believe the scenery, and it all begins with a misty waterfall).

I can provide notes, links, and further information on the historical and/or natural significance of each of the rides and how to link them to your advantage if your time is limited or you want to maximize your riding time.


General Notes (Only for those new to Mexico)

- The Green Angeles (Los Angeles Verdes) tourist assistance still operate on some of the major roads. Don't rely on this service but they can help with minor mechanical problems and towing advice.
- There are very few police patrols in these areas, you will be your own law for the most part and though there is mountain rescue available for the area near Pico de Orizaba and the Sierra Negra, it is not to be relied upon for anything more than a service of last resort in an emergency.
- Military patrols are infrequent but do pass some areas but on a weekly basis for the most part and not daily. In fact, there are few daily patrols of the more remote areas. But you will almost always find someone somewhere no matter where you are in either the state of Veracruz or Puebla.
- You MIGHT find someone who speaks MARGINAL English in the remote areas, and there is common use of Nahuatl indigenous language dialects especially in the Zongolica and Quimixtlan areas. Start learning Spanish.
- Three of the rides will take you to elevations beyond 3,200 meters of elevation, be sure you can handle heights especially if you are doing a rapid ascent from sea level. For example, you can easily ride from sea level in the port of Veracruz to the absolute peak of the Cofre de Perote at 4,500 meters in 3 hours which leaves little time for your acclimatization be sure you can handle upper elevations where you will have about half the oxygen that you have at sea level.
- Pemex stations can be found along these routes, however premium (the red handled pump) fuel probably will not be available but the lower grade Magna will be available.
- Carry small bills and change, don't expect everyone to be willing to break a $500 peso bill. Tip the Pemex attendants as they work for tips.
- Expect to attract a lot of attention in the remote areas. This can be both fun and frustrating depending on the type of attention it is.
- Celluar phone service cannot be relied upon in remote areas though there is surprisingly good coverage in certain areas.
- Almost every area will have a "tiendita" or little convenience store of some sort or another but don't expect to find many restaurants in the high sierra regions or in the remote areas of the high plains (ie. the Serdan Alta Plana)


MikeMike screwed with this post 02-04-2012 at 06:19 AM
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:18 AM   #6283
mark883
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Mike-

Maybe you want to put your VC/Puebla ride tips in another thread of their own. That way they don't get lost in our little asylum here. Maybe throw in a thread link here when updated or someone asks for more VC info.

I do need to Puebla sometime, get some of that quality mole poblano. Hard to find here in Ohio. Maybe the cartels could branch out into running batches of some of Abuelita's secret mole recipes up north here. I'd pay for some of that. But then, like Guinness, it probably wouldn't taste the same in our cold, dreary, cloud infested climate.
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:24 AM   #6284
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Originally Posted by MikeMike View Post
- Pemex stations can be found along these routes, however premium (the red handled pump) fuel probably will not be available but the lower grade Magna will be available.
- Carry small bills and change, don't expect everyone to be willing to break a $500 peso bill. Tip the Pemex attendants as they work for tips.

Folks shouldn't worry about lack of the high octane gas at higher Mexican elevations. There's so little air up there, that your engine isn't making the compression to truly need 91+ octane. And, its cooler up there too.

Giving a 500 peso note to a Pemex attendant is just asking for a screwing. (On a motorcycle, where your average fill is about 200 peso. Unless, of course, you're on a GSA Valdez Edition, which might actually need 100 liters of fuel )
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:10 AM   #6285
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Hi Mark, yes, it is very cool in the upper elevations, however the type of road you are on and the lack of air can give you an overheat situation. On the BMW GS twins you will appreciate the higher octane to avoid the pinking under load on the sand and dirt/rock roads. Many of these stretches are first gear.

I put the post into the Mexico route planning thread, thanks for the suggestion. I guess another thread in the Latin America section might not hurt.
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