ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > Equipment
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-09-2012, 12:45 AM   #61
mazman808
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Sydney
Oddometer: 100
Boer,
any measurements of your lightest tent packed in its bag?
Trying to see/compare it to my 2 person tent and see how much smaller it is.
Looks very nice and i would be interested in one asap if its that much more compact/smaller.
PM with price/shipping if you can?

cheers
mazman808 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 05:45 AM   #62
mouthfulloflake
Not afraid
 
mouthfulloflake's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: N.W. Arkansas
Oddometer: 15,909
ive used ripstop nylon,. and rip stop polyester.

the same stuff I make my hammocks out of, it used to be commonly available for $1/yd in the walmart clearance bins in the fabric dept.

No wrote ups, or threads.

cut 2 long pieces, sew them into a square, and add traingular reinforcements on the corners, and ad loops for tie out points.
then stretch it out in the back yard and spray it down with the silicone spray.


found a few pics, my seam is UGLY.. haha im obviously no seamstress.










Quote:
Originally Posted by wbedient View Post
What do you make your tarps out of? You got a write up or thread?
__________________
In dog beers, I've only had one.
Charter member: T.O. club.
Tilt your head, not the taco.

mouthfulloflake screwed with this post 02-09-2012 at 06:09 AM
mouthfulloflake is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 06:34 AM   #63
BoerSchoeman
Stealth Camper Tent
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Pretoria South Africa.Where the chicks have beards
Oddometer: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by mouthfulloflake View Post
ive used ripstop nylon,. and rip stop polyester.

the same stuff I make my hammocks out of, it used to be commonly available for $1/yd in the walmart clearance bins in the fabric dept.

No wrote ups, or threads.

cut 2 long pieces, sew them into a square, and add traingular reinforcements on the corners, and ad loops for tie out points.
then stretch it out in the back yard and spray it down with the silicone spray.


found a few pics, my seam is UGLY.. haha im obviously no seamstress.





I have some advice for you. Let me just search my photos real quick.
__________________
Creator Designer Manufacturer of the World's Smallest Biking Tent.
See it here:
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70909.0;topicseen
BoerSchoeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 06:47 AM   #64
mouthfulloflake
Not afraid
 
mouthfulloflake's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: N.W. Arkansas
Oddometer: 15,909
Many improvements to be made on that tarp design, I had a camping trip pop up for a buddy and myself, and made those tarps 2 nights before so we would have some shelter if it rained. I literally made those, and the sillycone wasnt even fully dried when we were stuffing them into the bags on the bikes.

the seam should run from the tie out points for starters, I would add more tie points in the field of the tarp, and not just the corners to give some other pitching options.

you could get really fancy and make the arcs instead of straight cuts to make it catenary to really tighten down good , but they tighten down surprisingly well as they are.

here are some basics.

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/cat-tarp/index.html
__________________
In dog beers, I've only had one.
Charter member: T.O. club.
Tilt your head, not the taco.
mouthfulloflake is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 06:50 AM   #65
BoerSchoeman
Stealth Camper Tent
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Pretoria South Africa.Where the chicks have beards
Oddometer: 93
Tarp advice

Okay i found it.

This was the first tarp I made as a test run. I stitched a 3m x 3m square and seemed the edges. (12'x12') When I set it up, the centre was sagging. See photo:


It didn't matter how much more tension I put on the guy ropes, but the centre simply wouldn't lift. All the tension was running along the side of the seam, and not pulling the centre of the tarp upwards.

So Out came my pocket knife, and zip zap, I cut arches into the sides of the tightly pulled tarp. The deeper I cut, the more the sagging in the centre lifted. Until eventually it was all gone. I folded it in half just to get it symmetrical, and when I pulled it up again:



Note the curvature in the shadow. I took about 8 inches into the centre of each side, and just did a freehand loopy cut to the corners. Then I stitched in a new seam again, and voila.!

Now I will use that seamsealer spray stuff again, and it should sort the dripping out.

__________________
Creator Designer Manufacturer of the World's Smallest Biking Tent.
See it here:
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70909.0;topicseen
BoerSchoeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 06:58 AM   #66
BoerSchoeman
Stealth Camper Tent
 
Joined: May 2011
Location: Pretoria South Africa.Where the chicks have beards
Oddometer: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by mazman808 View Post
Boer,
any measurements of your lightest tent packed in its bag?
Trying to see/compare it to my 2 person tent and see how much smaller it is.
Looks very nice and i would be interested in one asap if its that much more compact/smaller.
PM with price/shipping if you can?

cheers

Here it is. It weighs 650grams. In this photo it's next to a 1L waterbottle.
__________________
Creator Designer Manufacturer of the World's Smallest Biking Tent.
See it here:
http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=70909.0;topicseen
BoerSchoeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 07:07 AM   #67
mouthfulloflake
Not afraid
 
mouthfulloflake's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: N.W. Arkansas
Oddometer: 15,909
the easiest method ive seen, that does NOT involve math, is to use 2 tacks on the wall, and hang a string between them, adjust the diminsions to fit your tarp, and that will give you the curvature of the long cuts.

Ive seen that method, but not tried it.

so your pocket knife slashing method might be even better, but my hand isnt steady enough to make it even I dont think!

__________________
In dog beers, I've only had one.
Charter member: T.O. club.
Tilt your head, not the taco.
mouthfulloflake is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 03:22 PM   #68
mazman808
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Sydney
Oddometer: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoerSchoeman View Post
Here it is. It weighs 650grams. In this photo it's next to a 1L waterbottle.
Boer,
Price and where to buy please?
Ive sent you a PM as well.
cheers
mazman808 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2012, 01:52 AM   #69
nimrod
Pog Mo Thoin
 
nimrod's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Espinazo del Diablo , Tejas
Oddometer: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by IRideASlowBike View Post
I got bit anyway. Bug spray is probably the only solution, but that shit's nasty.




I have a good tent. It is very easy to set up. The problem is the rainfly. Unless you're camping in the desert where you're sure it's not going to drizzle, you're probably gonna set up the rainfly also, and the rainfly is hell in hot and humid conditions, which describes pretty much most places on the East Coast and even in the Appalachian mountains. I doubt anything would do well in those conditions.
Does your rain fly have upper vents? Makes a lot of difference releasing heat.
__________________
In my dream, the angel shrugged and said if we fail this time it will be a failure of imagination
and then she placed the world gently in the palm of my hand.
B. Andreas
"Betweem two evils, I always pick the one I never tried before" -Mae West
nimrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 10:31 AM   #70
dieselcruiserhead
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Park City, Utah
Oddometer: 1,241
This is a great thread.

I learned from folks who embody the spirit in this thread:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=385475

I have two bikes where I embrace the minimalist, a 02 520 where I drilled holes and used 15 liter dry bags. Check out this trip report. On page 4 we cover all of our gear, our check list, and my tent setup.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=717689

Here is my setup for 4 days. This included a pretty good shelter, stove, and pretty much everything we needed:




and then the second bike is my current '10 450. I now use a little 5lb rack from www.globetrottin.com that is killer. No more drilling, easier to deal with. It weighs so little that I leave it on all the time now.



I still use 15 liter OR dry bags but go through 1-2 a season and/or patch them with tape when they rip. But they are on their last leg. Globetrottin now makes 10 liter and 15 liter heavy duty dry bags for motos that are also awesome. When the my OR bags finally die, this is what I'll get...
http://www.globetrottin.com/Luggage-...Rack_p_51.html

Here is the link to our gear list
Jason's list and my list

here's the link to my tent shelter. Basically a tent, wihtout the tent! rainfly only. Less than $80 into the whole setup, including buying the floor tarp from Alps Moutaineering.


dieselcruiserhead screwed with this post 09-22-2013 at 10:44 AM
dieselcruiserhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 05:23 PM   #71
wbedient OP
MoTard
 
wbedient's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: North Central Washington
Oddometer: 1,221
Hey dieselcruiserhead...

Thanks for posting up your packing list. Pretty bare bones!

I did the WABDR this year and took instant coffee instead of the french press. I can definitely say the quality of the coffee went down. I think it'll be cowboy coffee next trip.

I've changed my packing list quite a bit over the last year. Maybe I'll have to post up another video or list like you've got.
__________________

2008 KTM 690 Enduro
My Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/wbedient#g/u
wbedient is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 04:28 PM   #72
Brian Keith
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Brian Keith's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado
Oddometer: 194
Great video. It's got some helpful pointers.
Brian Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 09:44 PM   #73
team ftb
Befuddled Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Lost in the jungles of Thailand
Oddometer: 1,630
Dieselcruisehead - Awesome post with some great tips. In my riding I've never trusted racks as I've always broken them from crashing the bike and a rack rod having to bear the weight of the loaded 300 pound dirt bike. These crashes have always broken the rack leg that sticks out over the exhaust. You and I do similar style trips so I'm curious what made you choose a rack system over soft luggage (or your drybags) that does not utilize a rack? Or was the choice made to allow you to continue your drybag luggage set-up? Also curious of your 15L dry bags, are they packed to capacity of are you only filling them partway?




I believe when packing minimal its about a mindset first. Most people want to lighten loads to ease the burden either on the bikes or legs when hiking. Meaning the reason for packing light is usually to increase the enjoyment and improvements in bike handling and for the pleasure the improvements in bike handling provides the rider. Some people get a great pleasure out of having everything including the kitchen sink, Kermit Chair, four burner stove, and tent big enough to shelter their bike in their camping kit, most likely this thread is not for that bike demographic. Minimalists put a high priority on bike handling (often due to the terrain they are riding is a bit more challenging) and if that means leaving something behind that weighs or packs too much its usually the choice made. In other words packing what is only essential for survival is usually the guiding force.

I'm currently using some gear from Kriega. The Overlander 30 waterproof saddlebags and an R15 backback.

Here on the last trip exploring in northern Thailand bear the Burma border.





Along with a Wolfman numberplate bag.



be warned that Wolfman has shrunk its numberplate bag capacity as of more than a year ago, I'm guessing 33%. I've used the one in the above picture for years and the new ones produced by Wolfman do not have anywhere near the same capacity. In the Wolfman numberplate bag I carry maps, lightweight packable rain jacket and pants that fit over my chest protector and riding pants with knee braces, along with dried fruit and snacks (I'm a type 1 diabetic so food is important for my survival).

Here's my gear packed into the Overlander 30 for a recent three day trip (only thing different for longer trips would be an increase in food).

I pack fairly minimal for my travels and so prospective Overlander 30 buyers can have an idea of what fits in the bags this is what I packed for my last 3 day trip with the Overlander 30 and how much space, if any, was left over.

This was packed in the exhaust side bag as it packs narrower, I had about 2 liters of space left over in the bag.





Left column from the top is: dried pork (pork jerky), dried mangoes, (not pictured was a back of cooked sticky rice for carbs), toiletries, water filter. Right column is electrolytes, first aid kit, tire tools, plugs for tubliss system and pump in green bag, spares (epoxy, zip tyes, wire ,etc), and tool roll.

The left side bag was packed with the following:




From left to right: Clothes in yellow and black compression bag: travel pants with zip off legs, T-shirt, thermal top and bottoms, down vest, two undies and two pair of socks, brown compression sack: Bibler bivy sack and down quilt, after riding shoes.

This load pretty much filled the bag with enough room for a sandwich bag of rice, more electrolytes or something equally squish-able and small.

Pic of the Bivy sack and quilt.




I normally pack a hammock and tarp with the quilt and its a lot more comfortable for sleeping, however the Bivy sack packs smaller. Here's a pic of the hammock packed in the Sea to Summit waterproof compression sack next to the clothes bag. The hammock, tarp, straps, and top and bottom quilts are about 10" X 9" when compressed



Hammock used on some single track.




When the Ovelrander 30 bags are packed with the hammock, stove, and pot it leads to the Kriega backs being packed pretty much to capacity.




I use a simple small pot with an alcohol stove. The lighter, rag, spoon, alcohol, stove, some instant oatmeal and raisins all fit within the pot to pack easily.



I'm starting to pack the stove less and less as it reduces my packed volume and sadly i crash a lot, having these results.



So my meals in the bush will generally be sticky rice, jerky, dried fruit and trail mix. if i had tortillas, hard cheese and hard salami over here I'd be eating that. Yum! Basically packing food that does not need to be kept cool. I live SEA and its 90F with 80% humidity most of the time and dried meats and fruit can go forever. Rice is available in all villages, though i do get sick of it and hanker for a nice thick piece of Pita bread on my trips.


Edit: forgot to add a link that may be beneficial to people reading this thread. I compared my current Kriega Overlander 30 bags with my past choices of GiantLoop Coyote and DirtBagz saddlebags here:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...rlander&page=2

You'll find is all is not peaches and creme with any of the packing systems.
__________________
Cheers,
Team FTB
------------------
Team "Fingering The Bean"

Looking for the woman that takes the wheel when I'm seeing double.
team ftb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 10:16 PM   #74
dieselcruiserhead
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Park City, Utah
Oddometer: 1,241
Team FTB, awesome man.. You've F'g nuts my friend! When you make it back to the states (or Canada - forget where you're from) if you ever make it to Utah, look me up!

Anyway, yes I agree about racks too. I had to scrounge to find a welder in rural Utah a few years ago due to another bike's broken rack. It was nearly a show stopper. this said, Harcus who makes these is brilliantly smart about his racks and they're super durable and really take a crash well. I've never actually seen one break. There is just something about the size of his tubing, his style of welds, etc. He uses the tubing for bark busters, etc, all sorts of stuff, and it holds up phenominally great. But the big thing is that the rack is less than an inch from the rear plastics so it really just serves as a brace for your soft luggage. It really just secures it in place, stronger and more solid than anything I've seen, including drilling through plastics and using the famous Voile rubber ski straps. Which I still use, but now around the rack.

My 15L, they are packed to the max. I put squishy things in them then squeeze the air out. Then lash it down as hard as possible and this gets the load really small. This is a huge advantage of the dry bags. Some also come with 1 way valves that also help with this.

I agree about the Coyote being much bigger. It defintely is. The dry bags stay dry as long as you don't poke a hole through them. THe OR ones I have are the perfect size (15 liters) but they don;'t hold up that well in lots of wrecks. Mine are still mostly water proof but they are $15 each and have a lifetime warranty I believe so I've sent them back 2 or 3 times or just bought more. They have always held up, just need some patching when you make it back. But when they get holes is when they allow water in. There are Sealine ones that are 20 liter but this is too big. But they're super durable - made of rubber. If they made a 15 liter it would be case closed.

So as a result of all of this conversation, Harcus came up with these bags in 5L, 10L , and 15L confirugrations. They open vertically, take lots and lots of crashes, are water proof, and are great. I highly recommend them, even if crashing a lot... and even with the rack. It's definitely the way I plan to go. He took a lot of my feedback and some of our experiences from riding multi day and used them. Makes my day...

Details on the product here. And a product photo.. supporting the little guy too. Harcus is the man!!!

http://www.globetrottin.com/Luggage-...Rack_p_51.html
dieselcruiserhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2013, 07:54 AM   #75
team ftb
Befuddled Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Lost in the jungles of Thailand
Oddometer: 1,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieselcruiserhead View Post
Team FTB, awesome man.. You've F'g nuts my friend! When you make it back to the states (or Canada - forget where you're from) if you ever make it to Utah, look me up!

Funny you mention that. I'm from California and usually go back for a couple months a year to check on my father. You were actually one of the people I was going to get in touch with regarding riding. I picked up a KTM 500 while back there and had planned to ride for a few months bumming about skiing and dirt biking in the back of a van before coming back to Thailand with the bike. Sadly right before leaving Thailand for the states I hit this "gotcha" hole in my friends dust.



Managed to bugger the arm requiring three surgeries, three plates and a bunch of screws so that kept me off the 500 whilst in the states.

Anyway, yes I agree about racks too. I had to scrounge to find a welder in rural Utah a few years ago due to another bike's broken rack. It was nearly a show stopper. this said, Harcus who makes these is brilliantly smart about his racks and they're super durable and really take a crash well. I've never actually seen one break. There is just something about the size of his tubing, his style of welds, etc. He uses the tubing for bark busters, etc, all sorts of stuff, and it holds up phenominally great. But the big thing is that the rack is less than an inch from the rear plastics so it really just serves as a brace for your soft luggage. It really just secures it in place, stronger and more solid than anything I've seen, including drilling through plastics and using the famous Voile rubber ski straps. Which I still use, but now around the rack.

As mentioned I have a jaundiced eye cast towards racks and off roading due to many failures both on my bikes and friends, hopefully Harcus's creation will change my opinion. Curious to hear how they hold up after a year of thorough thrashing/crashing so please keep us apprised if you can.

My only luck with racks were ones I fashioned myself out of flat steel and had them with no standoff at all against the sidepanels.



This would mean the racks could not flex or bend with the bike and bags laying underneath a crashed bike. Worked well for a few years however when switching over to the Coyote I was happy to give up the racks. My fear with Harcus's racks would be where the bottom tube on the side braces ties into the rear rack, especially on the exhaust side. This point has been the weak/failure point on all racks that I've seen and experienced. However my concern may be for naught if when the bike is on its side with the Drybag attached the ground does not put pressure on the point described.

My 15L, they are packed to the max. I put squishy things in them then squeeze the air out. Then lash it down as hard as possible and this gets the load really small. This is a huge advantage of the dry bags. Some also come with 1 way valves that also help with this.

I agree about the Coyote being much bigger. It defintely is. The dry bags stay dry as long as you don't poke a hole through them. THe OR ones I have are the perfect size (15 liters) but they don;'t hold up that well in lots of wrecks. Mine are still mostly water proof but they are $15 each and have a lifetime warranty I believe so I've sent them back 2 or 3 times or just bought more. They have always held up, just need some patching when you make it back. But when they get holes is when they allow water in. There are Sealine ones that are 20 liter but this is too big. But they're super durable - made of rubber. If they made a 15 liter it would be case closed.

Nice option with Harcus bags opening along the long side. Thanks for the link and beta.

So as a result of all of this conversation, Harcus came up with these bags in 5L, 10L , and 15L confirugrations. They open vertically, take lots and lots of crashes, are water proof, and are great. I highly recommend them, even if crashing a lot... and even with the rack. It's definitely the way I plan to go. He took a lot of my feedback and some of our experiences from riding multi day and used them. Makes my day...

Details on the product here. And a product photo.. supporting the little guy too. Harcus is the man!!!

http://www.globetrottin.com/Luggage-...Rack_p_51.html
Thanks heaps for the feedback Andre. Always nice to get advice and feedback from people that take similar style trips and put gear through the paces. If I get back to the states with a bike I'll be in touch for some fun.
__________________
Cheers,
Team FTB
------------------
Team "Fingering The Bean"

Looking for the woman that takes the wheel when I'm seeing double.
team ftb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014